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On August 1, 2009, Ma. Corazon Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino, the first woman President of the Philippines, died of colon cancer at the age of 76.

Born in Manila, "Tita Cory," as she was fondly called, was the mother of the country's 15th and current President, Benigno Simeon "Noynoy" Aquino III. She is best remembered for leading the 1986 EDSA People Power Revolution which toppled the authoritarian regime of President Ferdinand Marcos and restored democracy in the Philippines.

Notably, she was revered by many Filipinos as the Philippines' "Icon of Democracy". She was also hailed by TIME Magazine as the "Saint of Democracy", due to her well-known spiritual life and strong adherence to non-violence and democracy.

Prior to her post as president, Cory was known as the self-proclaimed "plain housewife" of the Senator Benigno S. Aquino Jr., the popular opposition leader and staunchest critic of the Marcos administration, who was assassinated on August 21, 1983 upon returning to the Philippines after his three-year self-exile in the United States.

This tragic event united the fragmented opposition leaders against the authoritarian Marcos regime, hence they called for widowed Cory to enter into the political arena against Marcos in the February 1986 snap election.

After 20 years in Malacanang, Marcos was driven out from power and Cory was formally and peacefully sworn on February 25, 1986 as the new president, a historic event which is now known and remembered as the 1986 EDSA People Power Revolution.

She finished her term in June 1992 and returned to private life, although she remained active in the public eye, constantly voicing her views and opinions on pressing political issues in the country.
Casket of late former President Corazon Aquino passes by EDSA on August 3, 2009 (Credit: militaryphotos.net). On August 1, 2009, Ma. Corazon Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino, the first woman President of the Philippines, died of colon cancer at the age of 76. Born in Manila, "Tita Cory," as she was fondly called, was the mother of the country's 15th and current President, Benigno Simeon "Noynoy" Aquino III. She is best remembered for leading the 1986 E...
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On July 30, 1953 in Manila, July 29 in Baltimore, Maryland, Joseph Kelly, public relations officer of the John Hopkin's Hospital announced that President Quirino's health is satisfactory and condition has improved.

"The President rested well last night and his condition is satisfactory. He had a period of difficulty yesterday when there was some internal bleeeding. He received several blood transfusions after which his blood pressure and pulse returned to normal and remained so through the night. His condition this morning is improved."

The day before this announcement, rumors of the death of the President arouse Manila. Vice President Fernando Lopez, returning to Manila by plane from Camarines, was heavily guarded by Manila police. The Vice President having joined the Democratic Party led by former Ambassador Carlos P. Romulo, would greatly complicate the political situation were he to accede to the Presidency.

The President arrived in Baltimore on June 30, 1953 to undergo various examinations and tests. An executive office in a room adjoining the President's hospital suite at the Johns Hopkins Hospital was set up. He underwent a surgical operation on July 8 for the removal of stomach ulcer.

It was announced on July 31 that the President will be given liquid food by mouth and there had been no evidence of internal bleeding in the past 24 hours. All stomach and intestine tubes were removed the following day.

President Elpidio Quirino left the hospital on August 15, 1953 and proceeded to Washington D.C. and remained there until the 24th. On his way home, he stopped at San Francisco, Honolulu, Wake Island, and Guam.

On Sepember 7, 1953, the President, after an absence of nearly 2 and a half months, arrived in Manila on the newest Philippine Air Lines plane, Legaspi, together with other regular passengers, at 4:30 in the afternoon. He was given a stirring welcome at the Air Port by a crowd of about 100,000 people and delivered a short address in which he expressed his gratitude for the reception, his happiness at his recovery from serious illness, and declared:

"I want to dedicate the remaining years of my life to the welfare of the nation and the people."

The President died of heart attack on February 29, 1956 in his home in Novaliches (Quezon City).
(President Quirino with Malacañang reporters) On July 30, 1953 in Manila, July 29 in Baltimore, Maryland, Joseph Kelly, public relations officer of the John Hopkin's Hospital announced that President Quirino's health is satisfactory and condition has improved. "The President rested well last night and his condition is satisfactory. He had a period of difficulty yesterday when there was some internal bleeeding. He received several blood transfusio...
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On July 27, 1872, Pantaleon Lopez, a Tagalog dramatist, a prolific playwright was born in Pandacan (which was then a separate town from Manila). He was the second of two children of Felix Lopez, whose work was ferrying people across the Pasig River, and Pia de los Santos, who sold candles to add to the family income. He was only 12 years old when his father passed away. It was Felipe G. Calderon, a regular passenger of his father, who became his benefactor and assumed responsibility for his education.

When he came of age, the trader and propagandist, Jose A. Ramos, employed him through his guardian's recommendation. Later, allured by the theater, he became a member of the Compania Fernandez Chorus. The choirmaster doubted his ability and had to be bribed to include Lopez in the group's performances until Lopez eventually proved his competence.

Lopez married Pricila Ignacio, a chorus member whom he met on the stage in 1893. The couple engaged in buying and selling at the Quiapo market to eke out a living. Later, they established a successful transportation business, leasing carretelas, which enabled Lopez to perform with the Fernandez troupe. However, it was only in 1898 that he started thinking of writing plays himself.

His first play, "Masamang Kaugalian", a zarzuela in three acts, was staged in Teatro Filipino on January 31, 1901. This was followed by another three-act play, "Maling Pagsampalataya", which demonstrated the absurdity of believing in superstitions.

On March 7, 1903, his three-act zarzuela, "Ang Infierno", whose score was written by Hipolito Rivera and Leon Ignacio, debuted in Teatro Libertad. This was his most successful play. Another successful play, "Rosa", was shown not only in Manila but also in Tarlac, Pampanga, and the Tagalog provinces.

His other Tagalog plays are:

"Zarzuelang Tagalog (1903),
"Tindang Tagalog" (1906),
"La Independencia" (1906),
"Bagong Infierno" (1901),
"Asamblea", (1907)
'Apo-apo' (1908), his only published work,
"Delingkente" (1908),
"Katubusan" (1909),
"La Perla" (1909),
"Aves de Rapiña" or "Ibong Manlulupig" (1909),
"Rizal en Capilla (1910),
"Dancing School" (1911), and
"Nena Pantoches" (1912).

Lopez wrote more than 20 plays before he died. His "Sintang Pinucao" was all but finished when acute tuberculosis caught up with him on September 22, 1912. The plays Nena Pantoches and "Ibong Manlulupig" were presented in Felicidad Theater, on Calle Principe, immediately prior to his demise. They were initially meant to generate funds for his medical expenses.

Besides acting, Lopez was an active singer in the San Ignacio Church choir in Intramuros for ten years. He was a tenor with a voice range comparable to that of Victorino Carreon and Nemesio Rata. He also played musical instruments such as the flute, the clarinet, and the violin.

By his wife Pricila, who often managed the business side of his presentations, he sired 10 children, among were Martin, who married Ciriaca del Prado; Pantaleon, a bass-baritone singer who married Asuncion Loanco, a mezzo-soprano singer; Maria; and Irinea, who married Vicente Ventura.
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On July 25, 1872, Santiago Alvarez, a revolutionary general and founder and honorary president of the first directorate of the Nacionalista Party, was born in Imus, Cavite. He was known as Kidlat ng Apoy (Lightning of Fire) because of his inflamed bravery and dedication as commander in the battle of Dalhican, Cavite. He was popularly acclaimed the "Hero of the Battle of Dalahican".

Although marginalized within the ranks of the revolution with the ascendancy of a rival faction, Alvarez continued to support the cause of the revolution. After the revolution, he enrolled at the University of Santo Tomas, later transferred to the Colegio de San Juan de Letran where he obtained a Bachelor of Arts. He then took up law at the Liceo de Manila.

Upon establishment of the American civil government in the Philippines, Alvarez assisted Pascual H. Poblete, Lope K. Santos and many others in the organization of the Nacionalista Party, wherein he later became president of its directorate.

In 1902, he presided over the Junta Magna de la Comisión de la Paz (Great Council of the Peace Commission). The Junta was created to accelerate the rehabilitation of the country from the destruction caused by the war.

He died October 30, 1930, at age 58 in San Pablo City and was buried at the San Pablo municipal cemetery.
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On July 23, 1864, Apolinario Mabini, often referred to as the "Sublime Paralytic" and known as the brains of the revolution, was born in Talaga, Tanauan, Batangas. He was the second of eight children of Dionisia Maranan, a vendor in the Tanauan market, and Inocencio Mabini, an unlettered peasant.

He began informal studies under his maternal grandfather, who was a village teacher, and his mother before attending a regular school owned by Simplicio Avelino, where he worked as a houseboy. He took odd jobs from a local tailor all in exchange for free board and lodging. He later transferred to a school conducted by the Fray Valerio Malabanan, whose fame as an educator merited a mention in José Rizal's novel El Filibusterismo.

In 1881 Mabini received a scholarship to go to the Colegio de San Juan de Letran in Manila. An anecdote about his stay there says that a professor there would pick on him because of his shabby clothing which clearly showed he was poor. His studies at Letran were periodically interrupted by a chronic lack of funds. Mabini would survive teaching Latin and then serving as a copyist in the Court of First Instance in Manila.

Mabini's mother had wanted him to take up the priesthood, but his desire to defend the poor made him decide to take up Law instead. A year after receiving his Bachilles en Artes with highest honors and the title Professor of Latin from Letran, he moved on to the University of Santo Tomas where he received his law degree in 1894.

In 1896, Mabini contracted an illness that paralyzed his legs. When the Katipunan revolt broke out late that year, the Spanish authorities arrested him for being a member of Katipunan. Unknown to many, Mabini was not a member of Katipunan but of the reform association of Jose Rizal, the La Liga Filipina. Bonifacio's movement sought military insurrection while Rizal's movement aimed for gradual reform. Though as a pacifist reformist, he was at first skeptical of Bonifacio’s armed uprising but would later become convinced of the people’s almost fanatical desire for liberation. Subsequently, he turned out subversive manifestos appealing to all Filipinos to unite against Spain.

Mabini came to the forefront in 1898 during the Filipino revolution against Spain. In the subsequent revolution against the United States, he became known as the brains of the revolution. He served as the chief adviser to General Emilio Aguinaldo. He became the president of the Cabinet and secretary of Foreign Affairs. He drafted decrees and crafted the constitution for the First Philippine Republic, including the framework of the revolutionary government which was implemented in Malolos, Bulacan in 1899. Mabini remained the head of Aguinaldo's cabinet until his resignation on May 7, 1899.

On December 10, 1899, he was captured by the Americans at Cuyapo, Nueva Ecija, but was later set free. In spite of his physical condition, Mabini refused to submit to American authority and continued to write against the occupying power. In January 1901, he was arrested the second time by the Americans and was exiled to Guam along with scores of revolutionists the Americans referred to as "insurrectos" who refused to swear fealty to imperialist America.

In Guam, because of his failing health and concerns that he might die on foreign soil, Mabini decided to take the oath of allegiance to the United States, a condition for his return to the Philippines. He was sent back to Manila on February 26, 1903 at the height of a cholera epidemic.

On May 13, 1903 Mabini died of cholera in Pandacan, Manila, at the age of 38.
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On July 21, 1871, Praxedes Julia Fernandez, the so-called singing sweetheart of Manila, a performer who is considered Queen of Philippine Drama, was born in Sta. Cruz, Manila. She was one of the three children of Mariano Fernandez and Josefa Quizon.

Yeyeng as she was popularly known, was one of the founders of Fersuta company, the name framed from the names of the principal lady players, Fernandez, Suzara,and Tagorona. Her group presented many benefit shows for the widows and orphans of the soldiers of the Spanish army.

On September 30, 1891, in grateful acknowledgement of Miss Fernandez's performances for charity, the Spanish army honored her with a gala affair. As a memento of the occasion, she was presented with a silver crown.

Yeyeng ended her stage career with a farewell presentation of the opera La Viuda Alegre at the Manila Grand Opera House on November 14, 1911.

On August 18, 1892, she was married to Ricardo Penalos Pastor, a professor in the Escuela de Artes y Oficios in Iloilo. Their marriage was not blessed with any children.

She died on August 22, 1919 at the age of 48.
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On July 31, 1946, Philippine Air Lines (PAL) became the first Asian airline to cross the Pacific Ocean when a chartered Douglas DC-4 ferried 40 American servicemen to Oakland, California from Nielson Airport in Makati, with stops in Guam, Wake Island, Johnston Atoll and, Honolulu.

A regular service between Manila and San Francisco was started in December of the same year.

International flights to Hong Kong, Bangkok and Taipei followed in April 1953.

Earlier, deeply involved in shaping the course of the country's historic events, PAL began its flight on March 15, 1941, using a Beech Model 18 aircraft, making one flight daily between Manila and Baguio, amid the specter of a global war.

Today, PAL has become one of the most respected airlines around the world with a young and modern fleet of aircraft and a route network that spans 31 foreign cities and at least 30 domestic points.
On July 31, 1946, Philippine Air Lines (PAL) became the first Asian airline to cross the Pacific Ocean when a chartered Douglas DC-4 ferried 40 American servicemen to Oakland, California from Nielson Airport in Makati, with stops in Guam, Wake Island, Johnston Atoll and, Honolulu. A regular service between Manila and San Francisco was started in December of the same year.
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On July 28, 1963, 24 Boy Scouts and scouting officials, delegates of the Philippines to the 11th Boy Scout World Jamboree in Marathon, Greece, perished in an airplane crash of a United Arab Airlines (now EgyptAir) jetliner in the Bay of Bombay, India.

The delegation took a KLM flight for Hong Kong to catch a connecting United Arab Airlines flight to Athens, Greece. The Egyptian airliner, a British-made Comet jetliner had a stop over in Bangkok, Thailand on the night of July 27, 1963. The ill-fated plane carried 52 passengers and eight crewmembers. Among the passengers were 24 Filipino boy scouts and scout officials en route to the 11th World Jamboree in Marathon, Greece.

The boy scouts who died in the plane crash

From the Manila Boy Scout Council

Ramon V. Albano
Henry Chuatoco
Jose Antonio Delgado
Pedro Gandia
Wilfredo Santiago and
Ascario Tuason, Jr.

From the Quezon City Council

Roberto Castor
Romeo R. Rallos and
Rogelio Ybardolaza.

The rest of the scouts

Victor de Guia, Jr. (Baguio City)
Antonio Limbaga (Zamboanga City)
Roberto Lozano (Dagupan City)
Paulo Madriñan (Pasay City)
Jose Fermin Magbanua (Negros Oriental)
Filamor Reyes and Antonio Torillo (Cavite)
Benecio Tobias (Tarlac) and
Felix Fuentebella, Jr., represented both the Manila and Goa, Camarines Sur Councils.
Only the bodies of Jose Delgado, Henry Chuatoco, Roberto Castor, Ascario Tuason, Jr., and Librado Fernandez were positively identified from among the human remains recovered in the Bay of Bombay.

Aviation authorities were not able to ascertain conclusively the cause of the accident. Sabotage was ruled out.
On July 28, 1963, 24 Boy Scouts and scouting officials, delegates of the Philippines to the 11th Boy Scout World Jamboree in Marathon, Greece, perished in an airplane crash of a United Arab Airlines (now EgyptAir) jetliner in the Bay of Bombay, India. The delegation took a KLM flight for Hong Kong to catch a connecting United Arab Airlines flight to Athens, Greece. The Egyptian airliner, a British-made Comet jetliner had a stop over in Bangkok, T...
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On July 26, 1844, Deodato Arellano, a propagandist and the first president of the Katipunan, was born in Bulacan, Bulacan to Juan and Mamerta de la Cruz. The family changed their name to Arellano in compliance with the Claveria decree of 1849.

After taking a course in bookkeeping at the Ateneo Municipal, he worked as an assistant clerk at the arsenal of the military’s artillery corps. He married Marcelo H. del Pilar’s sister, Hilaria, on April 22, 1877, after his first wife, Paula Rivera, died.

Deodato Arellano joined La Propaganda, a movement that sought political reforms in the country. It was founded by his brother-in-law Marcelo Del Pilar and Mariano Ponce. He was assigned to handle both the dissemination of the group’s propaganda materials and the collection of funds for the members who were based in Spain. He also made reports on the group’s progress and activities, which he sent to its leaders. He was assisted in the dissemination work by Del Pilar’s young nephew, Gregorio del Pilar.

La Propaganda was short-lived. The money collected to pay for the upkeep of the members struggling for reforms in Spain was allegedly misspent and, thus, the group was dissolved. To continue La Propaganda’s work, Dr. Jose Rizal established the La Liga Filipina on July 3, 1892. Deodato Arellano, who was one of the first to respond to Rizal’s cry to unite and organize, was elected its first secretary. He served under its president, Ambrosio Salvador.

A few days after the establishment of the Liga, however, Rizal was arrested and detained at Fort Santiago. On July 7, 1892, Gov. Eulogio Despujol announced his immediate deportation to Dapitan. That same day, at the house of Deodato Arellano at 72 Azcarraga Street, Andres Bonifacio, a Liga member, gathered together Teodoro Plata, Valentin Diaz, Ladislao Diwa, Jose Dizon and Arellano himself to establish an underground association, the Katipunan, whose main goal was to attain not mere reforms but the country’s separation from Spain – national independence.

In a secret meeting called in October 1892, Arellano was declared the first president of the association and of its first supreme council. As president, he endorsed the laws of the Katipunan formulated by Plata and Diwa. He did not last in that position, though. Several months later, in February 1893, he was replaced by Roman Basa as Katipunan head on the intervention of Bonifacio, who judged him an ineffective leader. Nevertheless, despite this personal setback, Arellano dutifully carried on with his work in the movement. While Bonifacio and other members were organizing popular councils in Manila, he himself was organizing provincial councils in Bulacan.
In April 1893, Arellano decided to revive the Liga and continue the work of its spiritual leader, Dr. Rizal, despite his absence. Aided by Juan de Zulueta, he reorganized the group and spurred other members into renewed activism. Subsequently, a new set of officers, led by Domingo Franco as president, was elected. Arellano was voted secretary and treasurer.

In October of the same year, the members of La Liga Filipina decided, finally, to disband. Two groups emerged from their ranks. One was the already established, though as yet secret organization, the Katipunan, which opted for revolutionary change. The other, the Cuerpo de Compromisarios, was founded by Numeriano Adriano in 1894. Its members chose to remain peaceful agitators for change in the government. Arellano was elected secretary of this reformist organization.

The circumstances surrounding Arellano’s final days after he was arrested on October 10, 1896 remain unclear. Some historians believe that Arellano, after being inculpated by Katipunan members who had been captured by the Spanish authorities and forced to reveal information, was himself arrested, tortured and eventually left to die. Other historians tend to believe that he joined Gen. Gregorio del Pilar, whom he had trained in propaganda work years before. He was supposed to have served as paymaster to the young general’s troops during their assault on a Spanish army outpost in Bulacan until he died somewhere in the mountains of Bontok.
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On July 24, 1890, Guillermo Tolentino, National artist for the visual arts, was born in Malolos, Bulacan.

Tolentino's works include the University of the Philippines (UP) Oblation and the landmark Andres Bonifacio monument in Kalookan City.

He sculpted the UP Oblation commissioned in 1935 by then University President Rafael Palma and originally located at the UP Manila campus in Ermita. It was later moved to the Diliman campus in celebration of the state university's 40th anniversary.

Tolentino completed his degree in fine arts in 1915 at the UP. In 1919, Tolentino went to the United States to pursue further studies on a scholarship grant from Bernard Baruch of New York University's Beaux School of Arts. He graduated from New York University with honors in 1921.

He traveled to Europe to visit renowned museums and art galleries in London and Paris. He then went on to study in Regge Istituto di Belle Arti in 1922.

Tolentino received national recognition for his work on the Bonifacio Monument, now a major landmark of Kalookan City. His winning design of the monument featured an obelisk with a bird of freedom perched atop of it. Around the monument's base stand life-size figures of members of the Katipunan led by Bonifacio.

Tolentino also designed the medals for the Ramon Magsaysay Awards as well as the seal of the Republic of the Philippines.

From 1953 to 1955 Tolentino served as director of the School of Arts' of the University of the Philippines. He retired in 1955 as professor emeritus.

He died on July 12, 1976 at the age of 86.
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On July 22, 1815, Apolinario de la Cruz, also known as Hermano Pule, crusader of religious freedom, was born in Lukban, Tayabas (present day Quezon province) to Pablo de la Cruz and Juana Andres, who were both religious.

Apolinario wished to become a priest but was disappointed when not one of the religious orders in Manila wanted to accept him because he was a native Filipino. It did not stop him, however, so he entered the San Juan de Dios Hospital, where he eventually became a donado (lay brother) and member of the Cofradia de San Juan de Dios, a religious brotherhood.

He filled his hunger for the word of God in the Cofradia de San Juan de Dios and by attending masses in the churches in Intramuros and reading novenas and other catechism. He returned to Lukban after he was expelled from the hospital.

Back in his hometown, he established the Cofradia de San Jose, aimed at honoring Saint Joseph and Virgin Mary, sometime in the 1830's. Having suffered biases in the practice of religion because of his being a Filipino, he setup the Cofradia as avenue of worshippers who would worship "God according to the dictates of their conscience". Given the nature of his Cofradia that celebrated mass on the 19th of every month, historian David P. Barrows described it as a "special cult".

Apolinario started the Cofradia with 19 members and called himself, being the leader, as hermano mayor, thus, he became widely known as Hermano Pule. His Cofradia drew members from the nearby provinces of Batangas and Laguna, and even from Tondo, Manila. Based from the registry or padrones of the organization, its members reached to around 5,000 individuals. It was not surprising why the Cofradia had reached such number because its recruitment system doubled the voting power of any member who could recruit twelve members and was also elevated to the position of cabecilla or headman. Hermano Pule would give the sermons while Father Ciriaco de los Santos, a Filipino priest, would celebrate the mass.

Hermano Pule tried to seek the recognition of the church through a petition to the Bishop of Camarines in order for the Cofradia to openly hold meeting and practice its religious rites but to no avail. The fact that only pure-bloodied Filipinos could join the Cofradia gave an impression to the Spanish authorities that it was political in nature under the guise of religious rituals. The Franciscan friars in the province suspected that its activities were schismatic in nature and had to be suppressed. Thus, on October 19, 1840, the friars pressured the gobernadorcillo of Lukban to arrest members of the brotherhood who were assembled in the house of Francisco de los Santos at that time. Hermano Pule reported the incident to Archbishop Segui in Manila, denouncing the unwarranted act of the friars Father Antonio Mateo of Tayabas and Father Manuel Sancho of Lukban.

On January 21, 1841, he sent another petition citing that the Cofradia is not anti-Catholic, to the Bishop of Nueva Caceres who forwarded it to the juez provisor Father Basilio. The letter endorsed to Fathers Mateo and Sancho remained unheeded. Not losing his resolve, Hermano Pule appealed to the Audiencia in Manila through Don Domingo Rojas but also failed. Meanwhile, the Cofradia did not stop from holding its meetings. On September 19, 1841, Spanish authorities through Father Antonio Roman located some members and arrested them. Consequently, Hermano Pule and his remaining followers lived as fugitives moving from place to place.

On October 23, 1841, the military force under Alcalde Mayor Joaquin Ortega, reinforced by Negrito bowmen attacked the Cofradia encamped in Sitio Isabang, between Sariaya and Tayabas but suffered great casualty. Ortega died in the battle. Aware of the possible repercussion by the authorities, Pule moved his camp to Alitao and fortified it with palisade. There he built a chapel where he assumed the title of supreme pontiff of the Cofradia, this time became more determined not to surrender to the authorities.

On November 1, 1841, Spanish authorities attacked his camp, killing hundreds of his men. Hermano Pule escaped to Sariaya where he was finally captured, tried, and sentenced to die by musketry. His body was cut into pieces; his head placed in a cage was hung on a pole along the road leading to Majayjay town. Other prominent members of the Cofradia like Dionisio de los Reyes, Miguel de Jesus and Francisco Espinosa were executed by firing squad five days after Pule was killed.

The story of Hermano Pule started and ended with his hunger to worship the God he came to know from his killers.
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On July 19, 1949, Justice Frank Murphy, a noted Catholic liberal, last of the American Governor-Generals of the Philippines and the first of the U. S. High Commissioners in the Philippines, died of coronary thrombosis during his sleep at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, Michigan. On July 20 President Elpidio Quirino issued a proclamation calling for national mourning and half-masting of the Philippine Flag for one week.

A touching state necrological services were held in Malacañang.

Murphy was Governor-General of the Philippine from July 15, 1933 to November 15, 1935, he was succeeded by Manuel L. Quezon as the President of the Philippine Commonwealth. The Governor-General position was abolished with the inauguration of the Philippine Commonwealth. He was U. S. High Commissioner in the Philippines from 1935 to 1936.

It was he who ably guided the country through the difficulties of that important transition period.

On November 14, 1935, the day before the inauguration of the Commonwealth of the Philippines, Governor-General Murphy addressed the Philippine Legislature in joint session on the "state of the nation", counselling the Filipino leaders and people to put aside personal aspects where the interest of the Government is concerned and declaring that "all officials should be humble before the majesty of the law" and that "above personal success and personal loyalty, the good citizen and true patriot will place the supremacy of the law, duty to the state, and devotion to the public welfare".

The current headquarters of the Armed Forces of the Philippines was named Camp Murphy in his honor. It was renamed Camp Aguinaldo during the Diosdado Macapagal administration.

In addition to offices held in the Philippines, Murphy was Associate Justice of the US Supreme court, Governor of the state of Michigan, Mayor of the city of Detroit, and Chief Assistant Attorney General for the Eastern District of Michigan.

Born April 13, 1890 in Harbor Beach, Michigan, Justice Frank Murphy died 59 years old.
(Justice Frank Murphy, photo credit: Wikipedia Commons) On July 19, 1949, Justice Frank Murphy, a noted Catholic liberal, last of the American Governor-Generals of the Philippines and the first of the U. S. High Commissioners in the Philippines, died of coronary thrombosis during his sleep at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, Michigan. On July 20 President Elpidio Quirino issued a proclamation calling for national mourning and half-masting of the P...
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A compilation of significant daily events in ancient and recent Philippine history, howto blogs and code snippets and more.
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Collection of daily historical events in Philippine history including notable birthdays.   Also includes a section in Philippine culture.  Code blogs and snippets is a  collection of code in HTML, JavaScript/CSS, Java, JSF, C/C++, database and server administration.
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