Profile

Cover photo
Verified name
391,373 followers|30,121,290 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
How Chameleons Really Change Color

Like many animals, chameleons can see a wider range of light than humans can, including ultraviolet light. Chameleons have developed a whole language of color that extends far beyond what we can understand.
Chameleons don't change color to match their environment; it’s just the opposite. How do they do it? By manipulating tiny crystals in their skin. Now, UC Berkeley researchers are on a quest to create synthetic chameleon skin inspired by these reptiles’ uncanny ability.
9
1
Michael Garrigan's profile photo
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
How did they evolve the ability to change color?
12
7
Trippy Eggos's profile photoRichard Rose's profile photoSharleen Shanley's profile photoGino McDuffee's profile photo
 
They didn't. GOD did.
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
How Many Fish in the Sea? Genetic Testing Could Answer That

Advances in genetic testing have revolutionized everything from health care decisions to crime forensics. Now, the technology may help protect marine life off the California coast.
DNA testing, the same tech used in human health, could change the way biologists study the ocean.
10
1
Um Zainab Hina's profile photoBurningstar IV's profile photo
 
Three 
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
ICYMI: Why Chameleons Really Change Color. New Deep Look episode explores!
Chameleons don't change color to match their environment; it’s just the opposite. How do they do it? By manipulating tiny crystals in their skin. Now, UC Berkeley researchers are on a quest to create synthetic chameleon skin inspired by these reptiles’ uncanny ability.
22
4
Gladys figueroa.'s profile photoHusam Chekfa's profile photo
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Meet Digital Health’s ‘Power Users': Moms

Mothers often serve as the “Chief Health Officers” of their families, and now digital technology is driving a fundamental change in the way they fulfill this role.
Mothers often serve as the “Chief Health Officers” of their families, and now digital technology is driving a fundamental change in the way they fulfill this role.
9
1
stevolution666's profile photoTerrence Lee Reed's profile photo
 
Here we have a child drinking Twitter through a straw
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
How did chameleons evolve the ability to change color?

Earlier this year, Michel Milinkovitch, an evolutionary geneticist and biophysicist in the Department of Genetics and Evolution at the University of Geneva and a team of researchers discovered that Panther chameleons change color using a crystalline structure beneath their top layer of skin.

Watch the latest Deep Look video on metachrosis:

#chameleons #metachrosis #colorchange #evolutionarybiology #squid #nature #KQED #PBS #documentary #4K #UHD  
Chameleons don't change color to match their environment; it’s just the opposite. How do they do it? By manipulating tiny crystals in their skin. Now, UC Berkeley researchers are on a quest to create synthetic chameleon skin inspired by these reptiles’ uncanny ability.
36
6
Miklós Animal's profile photoRouth Mucho's profile photoAmelia Nightside's profile photoChris-ann Xavier's profile photo
 
Cool
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
391,373 people
Melinda Schwab's profile photo
Shabab Naseer's profile photo
Liz Schmid's profile photo
Fgjddsd Fdhdfh's profile photo
Rachel Constant's profile photo
Sara Ikickz's profile photo
George Biegger's profile photo
Abhi Kunjumole's profile photo
Isela Mata's profile photo

Communities

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Monterey Bay’s Future Marine Scientists

For kids growing up on the Central Coast, actually getting to the ocean can depend on their socioeconomic status or where their families live.
Region is teeming with programs to inspire next generation, no matter who they are or where they come from.
7
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
GoPro Captures Sustainable Fishing 600 Feet Under the Sea

Pennisi has developed an innovative “light touch” net that hovers above the sea floor, and is sized to allow the juvenile fish to escape before fishermen haul the net on board.
When the Monterey Bay Aquarium was first getting underway, local fisherman Giuseppe “Joey” Pennisi helped catch some of the octopus and ling cod to put in t
16
3
Fredrick Van Rojein (Food with Flare)'s profile photoGlass House's profile photoLuke Vaughan's profile photoAustin ES STEM's profile photo
 
Sustainability is the way of future fishing, it's the only way to secure fish stocks.😆
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Chameleons have developed a whole language of color far beyond what we can understand.

Learn more in our latest Deep Look episode: Nature’s Mood Rings: How Chameleons Really Change Color http://ow.ly/RwjB0
27
3
hidayat Ansari's profile photoHusam Chekfa's profile photoJulie Boris's profile photoBrigitte Coulhon's profile photo
2 comments
 
Amazing
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Defense Secretary Unveiling ‘Flexible Sensor’ Initiative in Silicon Valley

Defense Secretary Ash Carter is visiting Silicon Valley on Friday to announce the Pentagon is funding a new venture to develop cutting-edge electronics and sensors that can flex and stretch and could be built into clothing or the skins of ships and aircraft.
Public-private partnership focuses on sensors that could be used in wide array of fields, from engineering to health monitoring.
9
3
Steve Devore's profile photomarco vasquez's profile photoBrad Boutwell's profile photoGladys figueroa.'s profile photo
4 comments
 
When a defense Secretary can keep us out of war, That's then I'll trust them!
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
California Cities Squeezed Out More Water Savings Again in July

Urban Californians stepped up to the plate again in July, beating Governor Jerry Brown’s statewide mandate for 25 percent water savings.

Across the state, urban water agencies cut total water use by 31.3 percent, compared to July in the benchmark year of 2013.

http://ow.ly/RwczO
Officials call it a "tremendous achievement," though freak July rains made things easier.
7
mani nagaraja's profile photo
 
water scare -city is an international problem;
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
*How One Doctor Used Mobile Tech to Aid Diabetes Patients"

People whose diabetes requires insulin injections usually have to make a series of visits to the doctor’s office, to fine tune their daily dosage. But many low-income patients can’t afford to take those few hours off to see the doctor. As a result, they often live with chronically elevated blood sugars for weeks or months until they can find time to get to the clinic.

Now a new study from New York’s Bellevue Hospital finds mobile technology can help low-income patients with the process of titrating their dosage, without them having to see a doctor.
Many low-income patients can't see a doctor regularly when they start insulin shots, but one study found mobile tech can keep them on track.
13
4
Jon Gorrono's profile photoPat Justice's profile photo
Add a comment...
People
Have them in circles
391,373 people
Melinda Schwab's profile photo
Shabab Naseer's profile photo
Liz Schmid's profile photo
Fgjddsd Fdhdfh's profile photo
Rachel Constant's profile photo
Sara Ikickz's profile photo
George Biegger's profile photo
Abhi Kunjumole's profile photo
Isela Mata's profile photo
Communities
Story
Tagline
Explore science, nature and environment stories from the Bay Area and beyond with KQED Science.
Introduction
Stay informed about the latest science news, trends and events with KQED Science. And explore the Bay Area through stories from QUEST, a science, nature and environment multimedia series produced in collaboration with KQED and other PBS stations.