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Startup Harnesses Supercomputers to Seek Cures

"Few natural phenomena are trickier to understand than the interactions between molecules in the body. They govern everything from immunity to motion to memory. Researchers can spend decades just trying to understand how and why one particular drug or protein interacts with another.

A young company called Atomwise is employing high-powered computing to help answer some of these questions, in the hope of completing the task exponentially faster than clinical research ever might." Find out more via our #digitialhealth  blog #FutureofYou . 
Atomwise is leveraging the power of artificial intelligence to discover new drugs.
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In California, Technology Makes Droughtshaming Easier Than Ever

"California’s drought is turning neighbor against neighbor, as everyone seems to be on the lookout for water wasters.

Take Los Angeles resident Jane Demian, for example. She recently got a letter from the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power’s Water Conservation Response Unit, about an unverified report of prohibited water use activity at her home in the Eagle Rock neighborhood of L.A. Demian says she was called out for water runoff onto the sidewalk, driveway and gutter, and the unauthorized “washdown of hardscapes” like the walkway to her house."
As California's drought continues, social media and smart phone apps let just about anyone call out water waste, often very publicly.
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How to stop a bamboo invasion and other surprising facts about roots

"Without roots, most life outside of the ocean would struggle to survive.

Plants provide virtually all the food for organisms living on land, from microbes to humans, says U.S. Botanic Garden executive director and botanist Ari Novy, who guided us through the exhibit. Plants would be nothing without their roots, which do much more than provide a stable foundation, absorb water and store nutrients like sugar. Here are a few things that we learned and saw..." 
The PBS NewsHour science team takes a field trip to the U.S. Botanic Garden to learn about roots.
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Ocean's hidden world of plankton revealed

"The hidden world of the ocean's tiniest organisms has been revealed in a series of papers published in the journal Science. Find out more via +BBC News  and check out our 3 min ‪#‎DeepLook‬ video "From Drifter to Dynamo: The Story of Plankton here: https://goo.gl/bXhN4L
Thousands of species of the ocean's tiniest organisms are revealed in a series of studies.
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Your Heart in 3D: Surgeons Can Now Practice on a Simulation

“The handful of the top surgeons in the world are like sculptors,” said Dr. Deepak Srivastava, a Senior Investigator at the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease in San Francisco.

“When cardiovascular surgeons go in to repair a defect in the heart, their success is so often dependent on an ability to see the anatomy in 3-D in their minds,” said Srivastava. “That’s more difficult for younger, less experienced surgeons.”

But recent advancements in the field of computational modeling may level the playing field in the coming years, particularly for heart surgeons. One such technology comes from Dassault Systèmes, a French company that specializes in 3-D design software to help engineers that build cars and planes avoid potentially-fatal outcomes. So why not surgeons and medical researchers?

Earlier this week, Dassault released its highly-realistic digital model of the human heart, which it calls the “Living Heart Project.” Doctors wear special 3-D glasses and use a joystick to zoom in to a ventricle or valve, while listening to every heartbeat."   #digitalhealth   #FutureofYou
The "Living Heart Project" lets doctors take a virtual tour of the human heart to simulate the effects of common medical procedures.
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Stone Tools From Kenya Are Oldest Yet Discovered

"...a team of archaeologists took a wrong turn and made a big discovery about early human technology: Our hominin ancestors were making stone tools 3.3 million years ago, some 700,000 years earlier than previously thought." Read more from The New York Times.
The tools, dating to 3.3 million years ago, may indicate that hominins were making tools much earlier than previously thought by some 700,000 years.
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Robotic Butt Helps Medical Students Learn Professional Intimacy

"For medical students, it can be a nerve-wracking prospect to administer intimate exams to patients.

A group of scientists at the University of Florida, Drexel University and the University of Wisconsin jointly developed new technology to help medical students hone their skills at prostate and breast examinations. Their research was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

The result of four years of hard work? A robotic butt named Patrick, who delivers instantaneous feedback to students about the prostate exam he’s receiving." Find out more on our #digitalhealth  blog #FutureofYou.
A robotic butt named Patrick gives instantaneous feedback about the prostate exam he's receiving.
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Four Days in May: Mount Lassen Erupted 100 Years Ago

"Mount Lassen awoke in a brief series of eruptions between 1914 and 1917. This week marks the centennial of Lassen’s sensational eruption in a mushrooming column of ash seen as far away as Eureka and Sacramento." Find out more from our community contributor +Andrew Alden.
Mount Lassen awoke in a brief series of eruptions between 1914 and 1917. This week marks the centennial of Lassen's sensational eruption in a mushrooming column of ash seen as far away as Eureka and Sacramento.
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Here’s Your Chance to Ask Our Geneticist Anything

"Why do some people love cilantro and others think it tastes like soap?" Our contributor Dr. Barry Starr of Stanford University and The Tech Museum of Innovation will answer all the questions you have about genetics, but were too afraid to ask. Tweet your questions to our Future of You host and editor @chrissyfarr or use the hashtag ‪#‎FutureofYou‬, and we’ll share them with Starr. +Stanford University +The Tech Museum of Innovation 
Our contributor Dr. Barry Starr will answer all the questions you have about genetics, but were too afraid to ask.
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Chew On This: The Science Of Great NYC Bagels (It's Not The Water)

"One of the first life lessons I picked up in college was this: The secret to the shiny crust and chewy bite prized in New York bagels is boiling. Any other way of cooking them, my Brooklyn born-and-raised, freshman-year roommate told me, is simply unacceptable.

Now, many years later, it turns out she was pretty much right. In a new video, the American Chemical Society breaks down the chemistry of what makes New York bagels superior to the also-rans – the disappointing "bagels" you often encounter outside of New York that merely taste like bread with a hole in it.

According to popular mythology, the uniquely superb texture of the New York bagel has to do with New York City's water – specifically, its low concentrations of calcium and magnesium, which make it softer." via +NPR 
Popular myth has long credited New York's soft water for the city's irresistibly crusty, chewy bagels. But the chemistry behind a superior bagel is more complicated.
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Earth's First Snake Likely Evolved On Land, Not In Water

"Some scientists have speculated that snakes first evolved in water and that their long, slithery bodies were streamlined for swimming. But a new analysis suggests that the most recent common ancestor of all snakes actually lived on land." Find out more from NPR.
Genetic sleuthing and comparisons of recently discovered fossils with living snakes point to a "protosnake" ancestor that likely had tiny hind legs and lived about 120 million years ago.
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All reptiles lay their eggs on land or bear live young. Amphibians require water to lay the eggs, and there is an intermediate stage where the young hatch with gills. Reptiles do not have this stage. Reptiles come out of the egg or mother as a non-reproducing miniature of the parents.
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U.S. Military Space Plane Begins a Fourth (Mostly) Secret Mission

"A secretive United States Air Force space plane is on a fourth trip into orbit. As with the previous flights, the Air Force revealed few details about what the unmanned X-37B spacecraft, which resembles a smaller version of NASA’s retired space shuttles, will be doing." Read more from The New York Times.
The X-37B, an unmanned spacecraft, launched Wednesday from Cape Canaveral, Fla. The Air Force is not saying much about what it will be doing.
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Explore science, nature and environment stories from the Bay Area and beyond with KQED Science.
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Stay informed about the latest science news, trends and events with KQED Science. And explore the Bay Area through stories from QUEST, a science, nature and environment multimedia series produced in collaboration with KQED and other PBS stations.