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Explore science, nature and environment stories from the Bay Area and beyond with KQED Science.
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Stay informed about the latest science news, trends and events with KQED Science. And explore the Bay Area through stories from QUEST, a science, nature and environment multimedia series produced in collaboration with KQED and other PBS stations. 


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'Viagra for Women' Gets Push for F.D.A. Approval

"Is sexual desire a human right? And are women entitled to a little pink pill to help them feel it?

Those questions are being raised in a campaign that is pressing the Food and Drug Administration to approve a pill aimed at restoring lost libido in women." Read more from The New York Times.
A campaign for a drug that aims to restore lost libido accuses the Food and Drug Administration of gender bias for approving Viagra and 25 other drugs to help men have sex, but none for women.
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Adreana Langston's profile photoDirk Van de Vyver's profile photo
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Climate Model Suggests Everest Glaciers Could Nearly Disappear

"By the end of this century, the landscape around Mount Everest may drastically change. As the planet continues to warm, the Everest region of Nepal could lose most of its glaciers, according to a study published in the journal The Cryosphere." Read more from The New York Times.
A new computer model suggests that without changes to greenhouse gas emissions, the Everest region of Nepal could lose 99 percent of its glaciers by the end of the century.
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Cod Comeback: How The North Sea Fishery Bounced Back From The Brink

"Cod love the icy cold waters of the North Sea — and British people love eating cod.

But a decade ago, it looked like people were eating the fish to the brink of collapse. Now the trend has turned around, and the cod are coming back."

Read more from KQED's Bay Area Bites via NPR.
A decade ago, fishermen trying to catch North Sea cod were coming up empty. Now, thanks to strict fishing rules put in place to halt the decline, this fish tale looks headed for a happy ending.
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Two Faults Could Make One Big Earthquake

"Ask Bay Area seismologists their most worrisome earthquake scenario, and many will say it’s not a repeat of the great San Francisco quake of 1906. They don’t think that’s likely. Instead, it’s a possibility considered unthinkable not long ago. That would be a rupture that tears the full length of the Hayward fault, between Pinole and Fremont, then jumps past the end to the next fault.

The next fault to the north is the Rodgers Creek fault, running from San Pablo Bay into Sonoma County. Scientists have made scenarios for big quakes on the combined Hayward-Rodgers Creek. The damage from shaking, fires and landslides would exceed $200 billion." via +Andrew Alden 
A new model of the deep earth east of San Jose will help earthquake scientists investigate a fearsome possibility: a major quake caused by a combined rupture of the Hayward and Calaveras faults.
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Scott Ohlemacher's profile photoAmanda Doi's profile photoCindy Demambro's profile photoBrigitte Coulhon's profile photo
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+Brian Smith you do realize that the USA is more than just Los Angeles, right? Most of us are happy to watch LA crumble as well.
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Startup Harnesses Supercomputers to Seek Cures

"Few natural phenomena are trickier to understand than the interactions between molecules in the body. They govern everything from immunity to motion to memory. Researchers can spend decades just trying to understand how and why one particular drug or protein interacts with another.

A young company called Atomwise is employing high-powered computing to help answer some of these questions, in the hope of completing the task exponentially faster than clinical research ever might." Find out more via our #digitialhealth  blog #FutureofYou . 
Atomwise is leveraging the power of artificial intelligence to discover new drugs.
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In California, Technology Makes Droughtshaming Easier Than Ever

"California’s drought is turning neighbor against neighbor, as everyone seems to be on the lookout for water wasters.

Take Los Angeles resident Jane Demian, for example. She recently got a letter from the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power’s Water Conservation Response Unit, about an unverified report of prohibited water use activity at her home in the Eagle Rock neighborhood of L.A. Demian says she was called out for water runoff onto the sidewalk, driveway and gutter, and the unauthorized “washdown of hardscapes” like the walkway to her house."
As California's drought continues, social media and smart phone apps let just about anyone call out water waste, often very publicly.
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Contact Lenses May Be Changing The Bacteria In Your Eyes

"...the surface of the eye in the people who wore contact lenses had triple the proportion of certain bacteria species, on average, compared with the people in the study who did not wear the lenses, researchers found." Read more from The Huffington Post.
By: Agata Blaszczak-Boxe Published: May 31, 2015 01:44pm ET on LiveScience. Wearing contact lenses may change the community of bacteria living in your eyes, according to a small new study.
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just thinking, are you suggesting that lenses are not good? How long would the bacteria multiply in your eyes?
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New Hearing Technology Brings Sound to a Little Girl

"Cochlear implants don't work for everyone. An experimental procedure called the auditory brainstem implant now makes hearing possible for those who can't receive cochlear implants." Read more from our new #digitalhealth blog, #FutureofYou.
Jiya Bavishi is one of a handful of children in the United States testing an experimental hearing device, a tiny implant in her brainstem. Jiya is now able to hear and repeat some sounds.
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One great step for those that are disabled. They get to experience the beautiful wonders of the world!
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Car Washes and Pools: Winners and Losers of California's Drought

"Just a month ago, the San Jose City Council passed drought rules that most car washing businesses could only dream of: if you live in San Jose, you’re no longer allowed to wash your car at home with potable water." Read more from +KQED SCIENCE's Lauren Sommer.
Starting today, the meter is running for cities trying to meet the governor’s strict new water conservation targets. And the new restrictions are already having “ripple” effects: some businesses are drying up, while others are cashing in on the drought.
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Am getting this car today
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Under-the-Radar: 10 Digital Health Startups to Watch

For the past several weeks,  Christina Farr our #digitalhealth  editor for our blog #FutureofYou  has been on the hunt for America’s most promising, but relatively-unknown companies. Over a dozen health experts [skip to the bottom for the full list of names] submitted their suggestions to KQED and we whittled it down to just ten."
What do these ten digital health startups have in common? They aren’t particularly trendy or flush with venture capital, but their technologies are highly promising.
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Robotic Butt Helps Medical Students Learn Professional Intimacy

"For medical students, it can be a nerve-wracking prospect to administer intimate exams to patients.

A group of scientists at the University of Florida, Drexel University and the University of Wisconsin jointly developed new technology to help medical students hone their skills at prostate and breast examinations. Their research was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

The result of four years of hard work? A robotic butt named Patrick, who delivers instantaneous feedback to students about the prostate exam he’s receiving." Find out more on our #digitalhealth  blog #FutureofYou.
A robotic butt named Patrick gives instantaneous feedback about the prostate exam he's receiving.
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may-may k's profile photoFelix Fröhlich's profile photoEric Kemmler's profile photoFrederica Mussolini's profile photo
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Sorry about your ass...can't help ya...that's what I would say !
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Four Days in May: Mount Lassen Erupted 100 Years Ago

"Mount Lassen awoke in a brief series of eruptions between 1914 and 1917. This week marks the centennial of Lassen’s sensational eruption in a mushrooming column of ash seen as far away as Eureka and Sacramento." Find out more from our community contributor +Andrew Alden.
Mount Lassen awoke in a brief series of eruptions between 1914 and 1917. This week marks the centennial of Lassen's sensational eruption in a mushrooming column of ash seen as far away as Eureka and Sacramento.
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