Profile

Cover photo
Verified name
345,212 followers|28,574,867 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube
People
Have them in circles
345,212 people
Bo Lucas's profile photo
ali faraje's profile photo
Howard Johnson's profile photo
Geoffrey Ackerman's profile photo
Bill Luvender's profile photo
Ahmad As'ad (Manga)'s profile photo
Cody Cenner's profile photo
Chavis Dake's profile photo
Dana Spears's profile photo
Communities
Story
Tagline
Explore science, nature and environment stories from the Bay Area and beyond with KQED Science.
Introduction
Stay informed about the latest science news, trends and events with KQED Science. And explore the Bay Area through stories from QUEST, a science, nature and environment multimedia series produced in collaboration with KQED and other PBS stations. 


Stream

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Researchers at SLAC Study Promising Alternative to Morphine

"Morphine is a powerful narcotic, commonly used to treat moderate to severe pain from surgery, injury and chronic health conditions like cancer or osteoarthritis. However, morphine has many negative side effects. It can cause drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, dizziness and constipation. More troubling, people can become dependent on it." Read more via our contributor Jennifer Huber.
Researchers are now studying a new kind of pain reliever with less side effects than morphine, using the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.
17
3
Paul Carstens's profile photoAndrew King (Science Student)'s profile photo
Add a comment...
 
Robotic Surgeons on the Horizon From Google, Johnson & Johnson Team

Your surgeon’s favorite new assistant? A robotic arm.

It may seem like the stuff of science fiction, but nimble robot hands are routinely used by surgeons in complex surgeries today. The field has grown dramatically in recent years, with hospitals around the country performing thousands of robot-assisted surgeries every year.

And now, search giant Google is trying its hand at surgical robotics by teaming up with Ethicon, a subsidiary of medical giant Johnson & Johnson. In a news announcement on Friday, the companies said they would share resources and expertise to create a “robotic-assisted surgical platform” to develop new tools and capabilities." Find out more on our new #digitalhealth  blog, #FutureofYou.
Google is is teaming up with medical giant Johnson & Johnson to advance the field of robotic surgery.
35
13
Lolita Lola's profile photoSamitha Kulathunga's profile photoShang Heng Wei (Shawn)'s profile photoAustin ES STEM's profile photo
 
About time
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Tsunami Preparedness Week: Building a Network of Awareness

"This week, March 22 – 28, is Tsunami Preparedness Week, a concerted national effort to bring together everyone—from emergency responders to the general public—to prepare for tsunamis, the seismic sea waves which can threaten our Bay Area beaches and coastlines around the world.

The great earthquake tsunamis in Sumatra (2004) and Japan (2011) awakened an awareness of tsunamis that had faded in this country since the great Alaska earthquake of 1964. It has been heartening to watch this program spread through internet campaigns and social media." Find out more via +Andrew Alden. 
Tsunamis are a worldwide menace with specific local threats. It pays to learn your local situation and keep the knowledge fresh in your community.
11
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
An Asteroid Boulder Will Be A Stepping Stone on the Journey to Mars

"NASA’s plan to snag an asteroid and bring it into orbit around the moon for astronauts to explore just took another step toward reality. For a while now, the agency had been considering two options for its Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM): One that would grab an entire small asteroid and tow it back and another that would land on a larger asteroid, scoop up a smaller, boulder-sized chunk and cart that back.

Today, NASA associate administrator Robert Lightfoot announced in a press briefing that the mission will go with the second option."

Read more at +Smithsonian Magazine.
NASA announces details in its plan to capture an asteroid and bring it into lunar orbit
25
5
Gamal Elghitany's profile photoarjun krishna's profile photoZeal Vadodaria's profile photoMelinda Welch's profile photo
 
Is the probability that they by mistake crash the asteroid onto Earth negligibly small? It looks a REALLY dangerous endeavor.
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Frontline 'Vaccine War' Live Chat; Wednesday 3/25, Noon PST

"Frontline aired an updated version of its 2008 documentary The Vaccine War on Tuesday night. The film dives deep into the debate over vaccines. While the overwhelming majority of parents vaccinate their children, a small but growing minority either under-vaccinate their children or refuse vaccines altogether.

On Wednesday (March 25) at noon PT, Frontline is hosting a live chat, with KQED health editor Lisa Aliferis. ‘Vaccine War’ producer and director Kate McMahon will take your questions, along with Carl Krawitt, and Dr. Arthur Reingold, Head of Epidemiology at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health."  Join the discussion now!
KQED health editor Lisa Aliferis moderates live chat with Frontline producer, two guests.
12
2
Mary S.'s profile photoMelissa Al-Rousan's profile photodora chiabov's profile photoJonathan Ballard's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Mary S. lady if you have something to say to me don't be afraid !!!you know how to use the comment bar and address it to me!!.,.i am not medically uneducated and i am also educated about our government system!! I also have seen the effect of this first hand,,.,have you?? i'm sure you have not and are just stating your ignorant opinion and that is fine,, you have that right but please EDUCATE yourself!!
Add a comment...
 
Mutation is Baked Into the Chemistry of Our DNA

"In a new study in Nature, the Al-Hashimi Lab at Duke University has discovered an important way that some DNA mutations happen. Or more accurately, they have provided evidence for something James Watson and Francis Crick predicted over 60 years ago.

It turns out that mutations are built into the very chemistry of our DNA. And thank goodness they are." +Nature News & Comment 
Mutations are the raw stuff of evolution and they are built right into the chemistry of our DNA.
25
5
Ian Atkinson's profile photoJames Luscher's profile photo
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
345,212 people
Bo Lucas's profile photo
ali faraje's profile photo
Howard Johnson's profile photo
Geoffrey Ackerman's profile photo
Bill Luvender's profile photo
Ahmad As'ad (Manga)'s profile photo
Cody Cenner's profile photo
Chavis Dake's profile photo
Dana Spears's profile photo

Communities

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Why Isn't Desalination the Answer to All California's Water Problems?

"Nowhere near enough water has fallen on California in years, and there’s nothing you can do to make it rain. So where else can we get water? One idea gaining traction is desalination: converting seawater into drinking water." Find out more via our reporter Daniel Potter.
After four years of nowhere near enough rain, Californians are wondering where else to look for water, and many are talking about the ocean -- desalination. The problem is, it’s really expensive to turn salt water into drinking water. And it’s hard to do it in a way that’s friendly to sea life. But a group of mayors around Monterey Bay say they don't have any other options.
16
4
Jonathan Ballard's profile photoMike Mackley's profile photoHeather Kelly's profile photoSal A. Mander's profile photo
7 comments
 
I remembered I saw that in Mother Jones.
http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2015/01/almonds-nuts-crazy-stats-charts

Yes we should not be growing so many almonds, and even though I am a beef lover, I realize that beef has a high a cost on the environment.  

We need to adjust what we grow, how we irrigate, conserve more water, and to get back to this post, really start building some big desalination plants.  But being an old curmudgeon, I don't think that will happen until almost too late.   
Add a comment...
 
Mosquitoes Can Smell Inside Your Blood

Garlic lovers: You can smell them before you see them. Some people would say they even stink! Hours after you eat garlic, your breath can still smell bad, as your body digests compounds in the plant and releases them into your blood.

Now scientists say a similar process might explain why people infected with malaria attract more mosquitoes than those not infected. Malaria-infected blood releases odors that lure mosquitoes, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis reported Tuesday in the journal mBio." Find out more via +NPR 
When malaria parasites infect blood, they manufacture odor molecules that smell sweet to mosquitoes, scientists report. So how do these odors get from the bloodstream to the insects?
16
7
george melit's profile photoAustin ES STEM's profile photo
Add a comment...
 
University and Biotech Firm Team Up on Colorblindness Therapy

"More than 10 million Americans have trouble distinguishing red from green or blue from yellow, and there’s no treatment for colorblindness. A biotech company and two scientists hope to change that.

On Wednesday, Avalanche Biotechnologies in Menlo Park and the University of Washington in Seattle announced a licensing agreement to develop the first treatment for colorblindness. The deal brings together a gene therapy technique developed by Avalanche with the expertise of vision researchers at the University of Washington." Find out more on our new #digitalhealth  blog #FutureofYou  via +NPR .
Six years ago, husband-and-wife scientists used gene therapy to cure colorblindness in monkeys. Now they're trying to make it work for the millions of people with faulty color vision.
7
2
Juanita Fuentes Lagos's profile photoManuel Schneider's profile photoFrank Dasher's profile photoAustin ES STEM's profile photo
2 comments
 
..... they are lucky that they can see at all! Perhaps the grocery and fruit stores should have more description on their produce displays, showing 'when picked' and when brought into the store. 
Add a comment...
 
How Did Ebola Volunteers Know Where to Go in Liberia? Crowdsourcing!

"From more than 900 miles away, Kpetermeni Siakor helped get volunteers to the right neighborhoods in his native Liberia during the height of the Ebola epidemic. He did it with Ushahidi, crowdsourcing software that was developed in Kenya in 2008, when the country experienced a wave of post-election violence." Find out more on our new #digitalhealth  blog  #FutureofYou .
Kpetermeni Siakor was 900 miles from home when Ebola struck. But with special software, he helped direct volunteers and supplies to the right spots.
8
1
John Enfield's profile photoAnn Tuckley's profile photo
2 comments
 
The more important question is: How in the h### did some of them get out of there and come back to their home countries carrying it!?! 
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Geologists May Have Just Discovered A New Layer of Earth

"A new study suggests that a previously unknown rocky layer may be lurking about 930 miles beneath our feet -- and evidence suggests that it's significantly stiffer than similar layers, which could help explain earthquakes and volcanic eruptions." via +TheHuffingtonPost 
Have geologists just discovered a new layer of Earth's interior? A new study suggests that a previously unknown rocky layer may be lurking about 930 miles beneath our feet -- and evidence suggests that it's significantly stiffer than similar layer...
34
5
D'adre Foster's profile photoAndres Castillo R.'s profile photo
Add a comment...
 
Why There's a Big Battle Brewing Over The Lean Meat In Your Diet

"When a panel of nutrition scientists tasked with updating the government's guidelines on healthy eating released its 500-plus-page tome on Feb. 19, one particular 52-word footnote threw a wrench into the conventional wisdom on lean meat. It caught the meat industry's eye, and it's created a controversy. Here's the line in the note that has the North American Meat Institute particularly upset: 'Lean meats can be a part of a healthy dietary pattern.'" via +NPR 
Should the government recommend lean meat as part of a healthy diet? That's emerged as a political flashpoint. The panel working on federal guidelines says the evidence on lean meat is muddled.
9
3
Owen Roberts's profile photoTerrell Eason's profile photoMike Mackley's profile photoRonald Jr's profile photo
13 comments
 
"everything is bigger in Texas"
Except of course BRAINS
Add a comment...