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Nanoparticles May Harm the Brain

"A simple change in electric charge may make the difference between someone getting the medicine they need and a trip to the emergency room—at least if a new study bears out. Researchers investigating the toxicity of particles designed to ferry drugs inside the body have found that carriers with a positive charge on their surface appear to cause damage if they reach the brain."

http://ow.ly/z3Dgd
Drug delivery method may be toxic
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arseye pezeshky's profile photoBrigitte Coulhon's profile photo
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Absurd Creature of the Week: The Feisty Shrimp That Kills With Bullets Made of Bubbles

"The greatest real-life gunslingers have to be the pistol shrimp, aka the snapping shrimp, hundreds of species with an enormous claw they use to fire bullets of bubbles at foes, knocking them out cold or even killing them. The resulting sound is an incredible 210 decibels, far louder than an actual gunshot, which averages around 150."

http://ow.ly/z3FpC
The greatest, smoothest gunslinger of all time—and I say it knowing full well I’m going to get emails for this opinion—is Clint Eastwood’s Man With No Name, aka Blondie, of Sergio Leone’s classic spaghetti westerns. I mean, at a public hanging the guy sat back and sniped the rope to free the accused, then blasted…
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Counting Polar Bears From Space

"Most Arctic wildlife monitoring is done using airplane or helicopter surveys, or occasionally surveys done by ship. For some species, mark-recapture methods can be used. But those methods are either prohibitively costly or inadequate to detect ongoing trends over several years. Seth Stapleton of the US Geological Survey and colleagues wondered if satellite imagery could be used as a more cost effective method for monitoring Arctic wildlife. “Remote sensing affords access to vast expanses of otherwise inaccessible sites, at potentially reduced costs, without concerns about human safety and disturbance to wildlife,” he writes."

Learn more from Conservation Magazine: http://goo.gl/nKfNQy
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Signs of Infection Seen in Child Believed to Have Been Cured of H.I.V.

"A child in Mississippi who was thought to have been cured of H.I.V. after aggressive drug treatment in infancy is now showing signs of infection with the virus, federal health officials announced on Thursday, a serious setback to hopes for a cure for AIDS."
Reports last year of the Mississippi infant’s apparent escape from infection thanks to antiretroviral drugs had raised hopes among doctors.
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Scientist-Online's profile photoNiveditha Sakthivel's profile photoRandal J. Hale's profile photomary Zeman's profile photo
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Oh no, this poor child. I hope they can keep it under control this time around, and that the first treatment did some good to minimising the reinfection.
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Stem cell treatment causes nasal growth in woman's back

"At a hospital in Portugal, the unnamed woman, a US citizen, had tissue containing olfactory stem cells taken from her nose and implanted in her spine. The hope was that these cells would develop into neural cells and help repair the nerve damage to the woman's spine. The treatment did not work – far from it. Last year the woman, then 28, underwent surgery because of worsening pain at the implant site."
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Louis Jay's profile photofaust fu's profile photoViet-Tam Luu's profile photoMichael Mason's profile photo
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Perhaps if the doctors had implanted ACTUAL neural cells INSTEAD of NOSE cells, the operation would have worked!!!! Here we go playing doG with nature!! ;-)
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Nominate a National Marine Sanctuary

"For the first time in two decades, NOAA invites communities across the nation to nominate their most treasured places in our marine and Great Lakes waters for consideration as national marine sanctuaries."

Find out more about the nominating process at NOAA: http://www.nominate.noaa.gov/
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Have them in circles
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Got Jet Lag? Food Choices Can Help

"Has science found a new way to beat jet lag?

A new study adds to a growing body of evidence that what you eat may affect your internal circadian rhythms -- the built-in "biological clock" that determines when you feel sleepy and when you're wide awake."

http://ow.ly/z3DtQ
Has science found a new way to beat jet lag? A new study adds to a growing body of evidence that what you eat may affect your internal circadian rhythms -- the built-in "biological clock" that determines when you feel sleepy and when you...
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How much science is in the new Planet of the Apes film?

"In a career spanning nearly 40 years, Frans de Waal has cemented a reputation as one of the leading authorities on the behaviour of great apes.

The Dutch-born professor at Emory University in Georgia, US, has made a major contribution to our understanding of primate communities - uncovering many parallels with human societies.

But he's not impressed with the way our evolutionary cousins have often been portrayed on screen.

"If they were shown in a respectful way, that would be one thing. But they are usually made to be clowns, which is not helpful for the conservation case or the ethical case," he tells me.

So what did this top primatologist think of the new instalment in the Planet of the Apes franchise?"
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NASA's Cassini Spacecraft: A Decade of Discovery at Saturn

"A decade ago, +NASA's Cassini spacecraft, the largest and most complex robotic probe yet built, arrived in the Saturn system to begin a marathon exploration of the gas giant, its famous and awe-inspiring rings and what has turned out to be a collection of some of the most eye-opening moons in the solar system."

Learn more from astronomer +Ben Burress at +Chabot Space & Science Center. 
A decade ago NASA's Cassini spacecraft, the largest and most complex robotic probe yet built, arrived in the Saturn system to begin a marathon exploration of the gas giant, its famous and awe-inspiring rings and what has turned out to be a collection of some of the most eye-opening moons in the solar system.
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The Science Of Settling: Calculate Your Mate With Moneyball

"There's another type of virtual eyewear that many of us spend even more time donning — one that has the opposite effect of beer goggles. Call them "expectancy spectacles" if you'd like, because wearing them causes us to raise our standards and expectations, often unrealistically, of everything from potential mates to job prospects.

The primary culprit behind this altered vision is not booze, but a potent concoction of Hollywood movies, social conditioning and wishful thinking. And fortunately, there are a few scientists on the case."
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Rupe S. Robinson's profile photoDarryl H Jackson's profile photoMike Mackley's profile photoMichael Atkinson's profile photo
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Easy- peasy formula! Just simply ignore $ and being attracted to them! "it starts with trying to ignore the superficial indices of value — attractiveness, wealth — in favor of hidden attributes with a stronger correlation to long-term relationship success."
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Non-Toxic Flame Retardants Made From Milk

"New research has shown that milk proteins called caseins, a byproduct of cheese production that normally gets dumped down the sewer, could help make fabrics more flame-retardant. The idea, which is still in its early phases, could lead to a replacement for current flame retardants. 

Researchers from Italy’s Polytechnic University of Turin began their search for a more eco-friendly alternative in the dairy aisle. They knew caseins, like conventional flame retardants, are high in phosphorus. So they tried coating three types of materials—cotton, polyester, and a 65/35 polyester-cotton blend—with cheap, plentiful caseins from Italy’s productive cheese industry. (1) During the tests, caseins formed a char layer of incombustible carbon on the fabric. The char stopped the flames after they had consumed just 14 percent of the cotton and 23 percent of the polyester. The cotton-polyester blend still burned completely but did so at a rate 60 percent slower than that of untreated fabric. That’s a result, the researchers say, comparable to a textile-fireproofing treatment medium called ammonium polyphosphate (APP). Moreover, conventional flame retardants release dangerous gases such as formaldehyde during a fire. No toxic fumes were produced during the casein tests."

Link to the journal abstract: http://goo.gl/VGU6nC
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Mike Mackley's profile photoJohn Judy's profile photoR. Deeds's profile photoRobert Greenwalt's profile photo
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+R. Deeds Being on fire happens pretty rarely, being in clothes is a regular occurance.

I was also more highlighting the naturalistic fallacy than anything though.
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The Little Spacecraft That Couldn't

"An audacious quest to reconnect with a vintage NASA spacecraft has suffered a serious setback and is now pretty much over.

The satellite launched in 1978 and has been in a long, looping orbit around the sun for about three decades. Earlier this year, NPR told you about an effort to get in touch with this venerable piece of NASA hardware and send it on one more adventure.

But there are no guarantees when you try to recapture the past."
A team of volunteer space cowboys may have to say goodbye to ISEE-3 and to their dream of reviving for a final mission the creaky, 36-year-old hardware. Failed tests Wednesday suggest a fuel problem.
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Explore science, nature and environment stories from the Bay Area and beyond with KQED Science.
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Stay informed about the latest science news, trends and events with KQED Science. And explore the Bay Area through stories from QUEST, a science, nature and environment multimedia series produced in collaboration with KQED and other PBS stations.