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After Decades Away, Western Pond Turtles Come Home to Mountain Lake

"For decades, the Presidio’s natural freshwater lake suffered environmental insults: runoff from Highway 1, sediment pollution, invasive species, voracious released goldfish. So finally, after a decade of hard restoration work, three years of turtle-care, and 30 minutes of traffic on Presidio Parkway, on July 18 at 1 p.m. the turtles returned to Mountain Lake." Read more via Bay Nature.
Biologists released western pond turtles into Mountain Lake, marking another big step in the San Francisco lake's comeback.
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Bones In Church Ruins Likely The Remains of Early Jamestown's Elite

"Jamestown, Virginia...was a difficult place, to say the least. Most of the colonists who arrived in 1607 died shortly thereafter. Now archaeologists have discovered the remains of some of the colony's first leaders — Jamestown's elite." Read more from NPR.
Scientists say remains of four men exhumed from what was once an Anglican church suggest they were well-nourished, "high-status" leaders in the early 17th century colony. And one was likely Catholic.
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CLARENCE...............mY FAMILY IS COMANCHE....SO MANY BUFFALO
SOLDIERS CAME TO LIVE WITH.............QUANNA PARKERS  BRAVES,  MY GRAND FATHER USED TO "CALL US HIS BLACK  ass
    INDIANS........Kin to Crazy........Horse........... Ramon.....(Black bird passing.)...........
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NTSB: Lack of Backup Safety System Doomed Virgin Galactic Spaceship

"Federal safety investigators said Tuesday the crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last October was caused by a catastrophic structural failure triggered when the co-pilot unlocked the craft’s braking system early." Read more from The California Report.
After co-pilot's error, descent brakes deployed automatically, destroying craft.
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Squeezed by Drought, Some California Farmers Switch to Less Thirsty Crops

In San Diego County, where water prices are some of the highest in the state, farmers are turning to crops that require less water. Find out more from The California Report and Capital Public Radio.
Water scarcity is leading farmers away from planting staples and towards planting higher-value, lower-water specialty crops. Think wine grapes and pomegranates instead of citrus and avocados.
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This problem can be diminished up to 80%
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5 Digital Health Trends Today’s Tech-Savvy Doctors Are Adopting

"Doctors around the world who want to be at the forefront of medicine have many more tools today than they had 20 years ago. Technology and research have come a long way, and primary care is a testing ground for innovative models that embrace these advancements."
Doctors around the world who want to be at the forefront of medicine have many more tools today than they had 20 years ago. Technology and research have come a
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More Millennial Women Plan To Pause Their Careers For Kids. That's Not A Good Thing.

"Last weekend I was sitting with a friend of mine over dinner and somehow the topic of having kids came up. "The older I get, the more terrifying having a baby sounds," I said to her, only half-joking.

As a single woman in her late-20s, the thought of children is only conceptual. Yet, since I entered the workforce I've thought about it a lot. The fears I have about having kids go beyond how physically exhausting being pregnant sounds and the fact that it means you can't have sushi for nine months. I know I would be having a child in a world where the financial costs are high, in a country with poor maternity and paternity leave policies, in a society where women still take on the majority of housework and child care, and where finding a truly flexible job is pretty damn hard. Basically, it sounds like a stressful clusterf**k."

Story via +TheHuffingtonPost
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Germany already has very generous maternal and paternal leave as a legal requirement. That hasn't increased the number of children being born significantly, it's still way too low.
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Empowering Schools Worldwide With Solar Suitcases

"They’re actually portable solar units used to power off-the-grid schools and hospitals in the developing world. And by assembling the suitcases themselves, Bay Area high school students are also learning about engineering and social justice issues." Read more from KQED Science's Johanna Varner.
Portable solar units assembled by Oakland K-12 students will be sent to power off-grid schools in Africa.
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A Sense of Self: What Happens When Your Brain Says You Don't Exist

"Ananthaswamy examines the ways people think of themselves — and how those perceptions can be distorted by brain conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease, Cotard's Syndrome and Body Integrity Identity Disorder." Read more from NPR.
In his new book, The Man Who Wasn't There, Anil Ananthaswamy examines the ways people think of themselves — and how those perceptions can be distorted by certain brain conditions.
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A Scientist Deploys Light and Sound to Reveal the Brain

Lihong Wang creates the sort of medical technology you’d expect to find on the starship Enterprise.

Wang, a professor of biomedical engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, has already helped develop instruments that can detect individual cancer cells in the bloodstream and oxygen consumption deep within the body. He has also created a camera that shoots at 100 billion frames a second, fast enough to freeze an object traveling at the speed of light.

“It’s really about turning some of these ideas that we thought were science fiction into fact,” says Richard Conroy, who directs the Division of Applied Science & Technology at the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.
Try to look inside the brain, and you're not going to get very far. But photoacoustic imaging may be a solution for the shortcomings of conventional imaging. It uses lasers to make the brain sing.
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Beneath Alaskan Wildfires, A Hidden Threat: Long-Frozen Carbon's Thaw

"Though the Fish Creek Fire looks benign, with little wisps of white smoke as its only sign of life, it's not.

A little fire like this could have a huge impact on the surrounding environment and ecosystem — not just here in Alaska, but across the planet."

via +NPR
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Major Flaw In Android Phones Would Let Hackers In With Just A Text

"Android is the most popular mobile operating system on Earth: About 80 percent of smartphones run on it. And, according to mobile security experts at the firm Zimperium, there’s a gaping hole in the software — one that would let hackers break into someone’s phone and take over, just by knowing the phone’s number."
via +NPR
Security gap on most popular smartphone operating system would let attackers take over a phone instantly.
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Honda unveils 2016 Accord in Silicon Valley

"Skipping typical new car debut venues such as Detroit, Los Angeles and New York, Honda unveiled its latest Accord model Thursday at a high-tech research laboratory in Silicon Valley.

Although an unusual place to introduce Honda's 2016 version of the mild-mannered family sedan, California's best-selling car last year, the announcement symbolized the region's growing importance for auto industry innovation."

Via +SanJoseMercuryNews
Skipping typical new car debut venues such as Detroit, Los Angeles and New York, Honda unveiled its latest Accord model Thursday at a high-tech research laboratory in Mountain View. Honda becomes the latest big car company to expand its Silicon Valley research division.
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CVT suck. Offer DSG, DCT, PDK type Honda.
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Explore science, nature and environment stories from the Bay Area and beyond with KQED Science.
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Stay informed about the latest science news, trends and events with KQED Science. And explore the Bay Area through stories from QUEST, a science, nature and environment multimedia series produced in collaboration with KQED and other PBS stations.