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Signs of Infection Seen in Child Believed to Have Been Cured of H.I.V.

"A child in Mississippi who was thought to have been cured of H.I.V. after aggressive drug treatment in infancy is now showing signs of infection with the virus, federal health officials announced on Thursday, a serious setback to hopes for a cure for AIDS."
Reports last year of the Mississippi infant’s apparent escape from infection thanks to antiretroviral drugs had raised hopes among doctors.
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Scientist-Online's profile photoNiveditha Sakthivel's profile photoRandal J. Hale's profile photomary Zeman's profile photo
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Oh no, this poor child. I hope they can keep it under control this time around, and that the first treatment did some good to minimising the reinfection.
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Stem cell treatment causes nasal growth in woman's back

"At a hospital in Portugal, the unnamed woman, a US citizen, had tissue containing olfactory stem cells taken from her nose and implanted in her spine. The hope was that these cells would develop into neural cells and help repair the nerve damage to the woman's spine. The treatment did not work – far from it. Last year the woman, then 28, underwent surgery because of worsening pain at the implant site."
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Louis Jay's profile photofaust fu's profile photoViet-Tam Luu's profile photoMichael Mason's profile photo
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Perhaps if the doctors had implanted ACTUAL neural cells INSTEAD of NOSE cells, the operation would have worked!!!! Here we go playing doG with nature!! ;-)
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Nominate a National Marine Sanctuary

"For the first time in two decades, NOAA invites communities across the nation to nominate their most treasured places in our marine and Great Lakes waters for consideration as national marine sanctuaries."

Find out more about the nominating process at NOAA: http://www.nominate.noaa.gov/
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Kolberg Art & Science Club's profile photoMike Mackley's profile photo
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Researchers Try to Save Huge U.S. Salamander

"With a long, slimy body and beady eyes, North America’s largest salamander wouldn’t top any cutest animal lists. The hellbender’s alien appearance and mysterious ways have earned the big amphibian a bad reputation and unflattering nicknames ranging from snot otter to devil dog.

But hellbenders, which can grow two or more feet long, are facing troubles bigger than an image problem. The aquatic creatures found only in swift-flowing, rocky rivers and streams are disappearing from large parts of the 16 states they inhabit."
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Finally, Really, You're Invited to Help Name Distant Planets

"The world known officially as PSR B1620-26 b orbits a binary star system about 12,000 light-years away. With an estimated age of 12.7 billion years, PSR B1620-26 b is considered one of the oldest planets in the universe, more than twice as old as our solar system. Astronomers found it in the 1990s because of the tug it exerts on its two stars, a pulsar and a white dwarf. 

As a name, PSR B1620-26 b doesn’t exactly have a ring to it, though. Some people instead call it Methuselah, after the oldest living person according to biblical accounts. 

Next year, you’ll be able to vote on that name, and maybe have it officially sanctioned by the International Astronomical Union, in a new project under the Zooniverse"
It's a new policy for the International Astronomical Union.
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Michael Atkinson's profile photoChris Kim A's profile photoPaul Wertanen's profile photoTheresa Evans's profile photo
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Blue
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Biologist Says Promoting Diversity Is Key To 'Keeping The Bees'

"Every year, more than half of the honeybee hives in the United States are taken to California to pollinate the state's almond crop.

Biologist Laurence Packer says this illustrates both our dependence on honeybees to pollinate many plants people rely on for food and the devastating decline in the domestic honeybee population in recent years.

Packer's new book, Keeping the Bees: Why All Bees are at Risk and What We Can Do to Save Them, explores bee pollination and celebrates bee diversity — from stingless bees that feed on tears to others that survive by invading other bees' nests."
Laurence Packer says humans need to appreciate both domestic bees and the some 20,000 species of wild bees. His book Keeping The Bees explores all types, including some that feed on tears.
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The Science Of Settling: Calculate Your Mate With Moneyball

"There's another type of virtual eyewear that many of us spend even more time donning — one that has the opposite effect of beer goggles. Call them "expectancy spectacles" if you'd like, because wearing them causes us to raise our standards and expectations, often unrealistically, of everything from potential mates to job prospects.

The primary culprit behind this altered vision is not booze, but a potent concoction of Hollywood movies, social conditioning and wishful thinking. And fortunately, there are a few scientists on the case."
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Rupe S. Robinson's profile photoDarryl H Jackson's profile photoMike Mackley's profile photoMichael Atkinson's profile photo
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Easy- peasy formula! Just simply ignore $ and being attracted to them! "it starts with trying to ignore the superficial indices of value — attractiveness, wealth — in favor of hidden attributes with a stronger correlation to long-term relationship success."
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Non-Toxic Flame Retardants Made From Milk

"New research has shown that milk proteins called caseins, a byproduct of cheese production that normally gets dumped down the sewer, could help make fabrics more flame-retardant. The idea, which is still in its early phases, could lead to a replacement for current flame retardants. 

Researchers from Italy’s Polytechnic University of Turin began their search for a more eco-friendly alternative in the dairy aisle. They knew caseins, like conventional flame retardants, are high in phosphorus. So they tried coating three types of materials—cotton, polyester, and a 65/35 polyester-cotton blend—with cheap, plentiful caseins from Italy’s productive cheese industry. (1) During the tests, caseins formed a char layer of incombustible carbon on the fabric. The char stopped the flames after they had consumed just 14 percent of the cotton and 23 percent of the polyester. The cotton-polyester blend still burned completely but did so at a rate 60 percent slower than that of untreated fabric. That’s a result, the researchers say, comparable to a textile-fireproofing treatment medium called ammonium polyphosphate (APP). Moreover, conventional flame retardants release dangerous gases such as formaldehyde during a fire. No toxic fumes were produced during the casein tests."

Link to the journal abstract: http://goo.gl/VGU6nC
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Mike Mackley's profile photoJohn Judy's profile photoR. Deeds's profile photoRobert Greenwalt's profile photo
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+R. Deeds Being on fire happens pretty rarely, being in clothes is a regular occurance.

I was also more highlighting the naturalistic fallacy than anything though.
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The Little Spacecraft That Couldn't

"An audacious quest to reconnect with a vintage NASA spacecraft has suffered a serious setback and is now pretty much over.

The satellite launched in 1978 and has been in a long, looping orbit around the sun for about three decades. Earlier this year, NPR told you about an effort to get in touch with this venerable piece of NASA hardware and send it on one more adventure.

But there are no guarantees when you try to recapture the past."
A team of volunteer space cowboys may have to say goodbye to ISEE-3 and to their dream of reviving for a final mission the creaky, 36-year-old hardware. Failed tests Wednesday suggest a fuel problem.
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Communicating Science Through An Artistic Lens at Stanford

+Stanford University scientist Sue McConnell will receive $1 million over the next five years to sustain a program that teaches biology seniors to communicate science to the public through art - learn more from +Danna Staaf at KQED Science.
Stanford scientist Sue McConnell will receive $1 million over the next five years to sustain a program that teaches biology seniors to communicate science to the public through art.
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Excellantya!!!
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Bay Area governments make big electric-vehicle buy

"A group of San Francisco Bay Area cities, counties and water agencies has joined forces for what is being billed as one of the largest single government purchases of all-electric vehicles in the country.

The six cities, two counties and two water agencies have united to buy 90 electric vehicles with the help of a $2.8 million grant from the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, a regional transportation agency, officials with the Bay Area Climate Collaborative said Tuesday."
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With DARPA Support, Lawrence Lab Seeks to Develop Brain Implant to Treat Memory Loss

"Misplace your car keys? Forget to buy milk at the store? Temporary lapses in memory can be such a nuisance. But for those coping with a memory-impairing disease or traumatic brain injury, this kind of memory loss can become debilitating.

“Anyone who has witnessed the effects of memory loss in another person knows its toll and how few options are available to treat it,” says Justin Sanchez, program manager at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, better known as DARPA.

On Tuesday DARPA announced a new multi-million dollar effort to develop and test a new generation of therapeutic brain implants that will help service members, veterans and civilians recover from memory loss caused by brain trauma or disease."
Misplace your car keys? Forget to buy milk at the store? For those coping with a memory-impairing disease or injury, memory loss can be debilitating. New therapeutic brain implants could help patients overcome memory deficits.
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Leopold Arguello's profile photoMusi cFiend's profile photoDouglas Blaack's profile photoB Ambrose's profile photo
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Implants for the ear are about the only reasonable case. It is religious, otherwise, because we have other tech/traits.
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Explore science, nature and environment stories from the Bay Area and beyond with KQED Science.
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Stay informed about the latest science news, trends and events with KQED Science. And explore the Bay Area through stories from QUEST, a science, nature and environment multimedia series produced in collaboration with KQED and other PBS stations.