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The Greenhouse Effect Is Truly in Effect, Observations Show

"Climate scientists have finally demonstrated that rising carbon dioxide in the air is trapping more of the sun’s heat. A paper published Wednesday has used a decade of painstaking measurements to confirm the basic greenhouse mechanism of global warming beyond a reasonable doubt.

Physicists have foreseen greenhouse warming of the Earth since the 19th century, and the greenhouse effect is the foundation of climate-change science. This is accepted knowledge by now, but science is supposed to make really sure of things." via +Andrew Alden 
A long record of atmospheric observations has put an "official" stamp on the foundation of climate-change science: the greenhouse effect really works the way we've always said it does.
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So it's official? The climate actually changes? 
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Something Californians Can Agree On: The Drought’s Serious

"The Field Poll has been surveying Californians in good times and bad for decades, and rarely does it find respondents unanimous — or virtually unanimous — on anything. A new Field Poll finds that 94 percent of Californians view the drought, now in its fourth year, as either extremely (68 percent) or somewhat (26 percent) serious." 
New poll finds nearly unanimous concern as state enters fourth year of much drier-than-normal conditions.
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Even bumblebees 'merge' their memories

"Bumblebees are just as guilty of merging memories as NBC anchor Brian Williams, it turns out.

A new study, published online Thursday in the journal Current Biology, suggests that Bombus terrestris is prone to a type of memory error common among humans -- melding information from two episodes into one." via +Los Angeles Times  
Bumblebees are just as guilty of merging memories as NBC anchor Brian Williams, it turns out.
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Ah ha ha ha ha! :-)
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Gerbils Likely Pushed Plague To Europe in Middle Ages

"Gerbils are a beloved classroom pet, but they might also be deadly killers. A study now claims that gerbils helped bring bubonic plague to Medieval Europe and contributed to the deaths of millions.

Plague is caused by bacteria (Yersinia pestis) found in rodents, and the fleas that live on rodents. The rodent that's usually Suspect Zero is the rat." +NPR 
Shifts in climate in the Middle Ages likely drove bubonic plague bacteria from gerbils in Asia to people in Europe, research now suggests. Rats don't deserve all the blame.
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Here Kitty Kitty..
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Scientists Create the Most Precise 3D Map of the Human Genome Yet 

"...the National Institutes of Health has launched a new initiative called the 4D Nucleome project which will create even more detailed maps of the human genome. The project will involve many researchers all working together to map the 3D structure of the genome in a wide variety of healthy and diseased cell types over time. (Time is the 4th dimension in 4D.)" 
Until recently scientists have not been able to figure out the information coded in the folding of our DNA in the nucleus. A new map now makes this task simpler. This kind of map will not only tell us how the instructions in our DNA lead to making each one of us, but it may also provide new ways to understand and even treat diseases like cancer.
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A Visit to Apple’s Secret New Headquarters

"The world’s largest Apple product is taking shape in Cupertino. Apple is just one of several huge tech companies in the Bay Area building corporate campuses this year...Known as “the spaceship” – or, if you prefer, the “donut” – the building will be a glass and concrete ring, a mile in circumference, surrounded by trees and rolling hills. Much of the new building will be sculpted from the remains of the former Hewlett Packard campus that used to be on site. Fifteen thousand people will work here." 

http://blogs.kqed.org/science/audio/a-visit-to-apples-secret-new-headquarters/
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A Visit to Apple’s Secret New Headquarters: http://goo.gl/Q6wMio
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23andMe finally wins FDA approval for a genetic health test

"Fourteen months after having its genetic health tests ordered from the market by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 23andMe today won a huge victory both for itself and for consumer genetic testing by receiving FDA approval to market a single genetic test for a disorder called Bloom Syndrome." via +VentureBeat 
With the approval, the consumer gene sequencing company is well on its way back into the good favor of the regulator, after being forced to remove earlier tests from the market.
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Strongest Natural Material in the World Discovered: Limpet Teeth

"Limpets are a type of mollusk found along our coasts... a new study has revealed that they grow the strongest natural material in in the world – found in the tiny teeth on their rasping tongue, or radula. This knocks spider silk, long proclaimed as the strongest natural material, into second place." Find out more from our community contributor Sharol Nelson- Embry of the  +East Bay Regional Park District   

Also check out our short video about how limpets could help fight cancer here: http://goo.gl/eQxwD2
The strongest natural material in the world has just been discovered: limpet teeth. Learn more about how this discovery could improve our future technology and innovations through biomimicry.
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Engineering Is Saving the World with Cookstoves

Explore the connections between engineering, science and improving health and safety with KQED’s new e-book, "Engineering Is Saving the World with Cookstoves." The book is available to view on your computer, tablet and smartphone for free.
Explore the connections between engineering and science with KQED’s new, free e-book, Engineering Is Saving the World with Cookstoves. Learn how researchers designed a new, more efficient cookstove to improve the quality of life for families in Darfur.
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Hello +Jack Fermon, hope you doing great. You posted something about #engineering . And because you like and do #science   and #cooking , maybe you like this one too.   
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NASA Sees 'Bright Spots' On Dwarf Planet In Our Solar System 

"Scientists are puzzled by a new image taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft, which found two bright spots on the dwarf planet Ceres. The spots are noticeably brighter than other parts of the surface, which looks to be rocky and pock-marked.

Ceres lies in an asteroid belt between the paths of Mars and Jupiter. A white area was previously seen in 2004, in an image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. But new images show there are actually two spots, and scientists do not know what's causing them." via +NPR 
Scientists are puzzled by a new image taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft, which found two bright spots on the dwarf planet Ceres. The spots are noticeably brighter than other parts of the surface.
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yes boosters ,i never heard of this planet 500 miles across could hold a lot of fresh water ,could someone just push it were it is needed like mars ,
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Railroads, Big Oil Move to Ease Fears Over Crude Shipments

"Railroads and oil companies stage a show-and-tell in Sacramento to highlight safety measures they’ve put in place. Environmentalists and community activists remain skeptical."
Railroads and oil companies stage a show-and-tell in Sacramento to highlight safety measures they've put in place. Environmentalists and community activists remain skeptical.
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When things go sideways, increase your PR budget.
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Ralph Nobles dies; Manhattan Project physicist saved San Francisco Bay wetlands

"Ralph Nobles, a nuclear physicist who worked on the Manhattan Project, personally witnessed the first nuclear bomb blast in the New Mexico desert, and later led efforts to save thousands of acres of San Francisco Bay wetlands from development, has died...

A Redwood City resident for half a century, Nobles died Friday following complications of pneumonia at Kaiser Permanente Redwood City Medical Center. He was 94." via +San Jose Mercury News 
A Redwood City resident for half a century, Nobles died Friday following complications of pneumonia at Kaiser Permanente Redwood City Medical Center.
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RIP The technologist transformed from destruction to Conservation 
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Explore science, nature and environment stories from the Bay Area and beyond with KQED Science.
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Stay informed about the latest science news, trends and events with KQED Science. And explore the Bay Area through stories from QUEST, a science, nature and environment multimedia series produced in collaboration with KQED and other PBS stations.