Profile

Cover photo
Verified name
370,589 followers|29,455,879 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Take a (Science) Hike: Five Great Bay Area Excursions

"Amid the fireworks, picnics and concerts happening over Independence Day, many Bay Area residents are also looking to explore the great outdoors. Here are five accessible hikes that also provide opportunities to learn about science, nature and the environment."
This holiday weekend, get outdoors and take a walk on the science side.
10
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Russia Finally Launches Supplies To ISS After Earlier Failures

"A Russian rocket filled with much-needed supplies for the International Space Station lifted off from a pad in Kazakhstan early today after two previous re-supply missions failed.

NPR's Corey Flintoff reports that the successful launch of the Russian Soyuz spacecraft, known as the Progress 60P, which is set to dock with the station on Sunday, was a relief to the astronauts and cosmonauts on the space station."
The liftoff of the Soyuz Progress 60P was a relief to astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the International Space Station after two previous resupply missions — one Russian and one American — failed.
10
2
seide wolsabo's profile photoJack Malchow's profile photoLuke Vaughan's profile photo
 
Good thing I know they are not gods but brilliant I mean reall brilliant, Not like the ones in between the Rumors and the script good luck to you.
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
When It Comes To Learning for the Deaf, ‘It’s a 3-D Language’

"In a small, sparse makeshift lab, Melissa Malzkuhn practices her range of motion in a black, full-body unitard dotted with light-reflecting nodes. She’s strapped on a motion capture, or mocap, suit. Infrared cameras that line the room will capture her movement and translate it into a 3-D character, or avatar, on a computer.

But she’s not making a Disney animated film.

Three-dimensional motion capture has developed quickly in the last few years, most notably as a Hollywood production tool for computer animation in films like Planet of the Apes and Avatar."  Find out more on our #digitalhealth blog  #FutureofYou  
English nursery rhymes don't translate well to ASL, a visual language. One team is merging high tech with cognitive research to improve language learning for deaf and hard of hearing children.
14
2
Curtis Washington's profile photoPaul Minda's profile photo
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Backpacks on Seabirds Hint at Their Navigation Secret

"Now, flocks of GPS-wearing seabirds add to growing evidence that birds not only follow their noses, but also remember smells like directions. Rather than blindly flying around the ocean, the birds may associate smells with specific wind patterns." Find out more from National Geographic.
11
2
P Thompson's profile photoLuke Vaughan's profile photo
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Combinations of 'Safe' Chemicals May Increase Cancer Risk, Study Suggests

"Lots of chemicals are considered safe in low doses. But what happens when you ingest a little bit of a lot of different chemicals over time?" Find out more from The Los Angeles Times.
Lots of chemicals are considered safe in low doses. But what happens when you ingest a little bit of a lot of different chemicals over time?
16
4
Peter Scully's profile photoLauren Egan's profile photo
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Asia - First Peoples - PBS

What really happened when early humans ventured out of Africa and into Asia? The latest evidence suggests they left far earlier than previously thought and interbred with other types of ancient humans. Watch First Peoples: Asia tonight at 9pm on KQED Public Television 9.
First Peoples: Asia premieres July 1 at 9/8c on PBS. Discover the Denisovans, a type of ancient human living across much of Asia. Our ancestors mated with them and their genes found a home within our DNA. More than that, they’ve helped us face down extinction.
10
1
Bill Wohl's profile photoAngela LaMarsh's profile photo
 
Fantastic.
Thank U.
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Using Games to Train Our Brains: In Conversation With Dr. Adam Gazzaley

"...one company, Boston-based Akili Interactive Labs, has submitted its video game for regulatory approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The makers of the game hope to someday help children and young adults with autism improve their brain function and motor skills." Read the full interview with "chief game designer" and UCSF neuroscientist Dr. Adam Gazzaley on our ‪#‎digitalhealth‬ blog, ‪#‎FutureofYou‬.
I sat down with University of San Francisco, California neuroscientist and "chief game designer" Dr. Adam Gazzaley to discuss the evolving role of video games.
8
2
P Thompson's profile photoLuke Vaughan's profile photo
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
370,589 people
pall griffin's profile photo
Ana Rivera's profile photo
Jose Menjivar's profile photo
becky dam's profile photo
Isela Mata's profile photo
Tess Bashaw's profile photo
Lisa Marie Taylor's profile photo
Chris Wallo's profile photo
Cody Cenner's profile photo

Communities

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Don’t Get Your Kids’ Genes Sequenced Just to Keep Up

"You can now order genetic tests off the Internet and get your child’s genome sequenced for less than the cost of a new car. The question is, should you?

Almost certainly not, according to the American Society for Human Genetics, which released a position paper Thursday intended to give parents some help navigating the dizzying world of genetic tests.

“This is something that we don’t think is ready for prime time for kids,” says Dr. Jeffrey Botkin, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Utah and lead author of the paper." Find out more on our #digitalhealth blog #FutureofYou
Just because you can get your children's genome sequenced doesn't mean it's going to do their health any good, a report finds. Most benefits from genetic medicine come from a tight focus.
9
3
Jessica Meyer's profile photoBloo Alien's profile photo
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Toxic Algae in Local Lakes Puts Damper on Summer Swimming

"For the upcoming 4th of July weekend, two lakes in the East Bay Regional Parks will be closed due to toxic blue-green algae — Temescal in Oakland and Quarry Lakes in Fremont — and warnings are in place at Lake Chabot and Shinn Pond.

Characterized by pea-green water or mats of algae at the surface, blue-green algae, also called cyanobacteria, “blooms” with warm weather and drought, then “busts,” dying and decomposing and sometimes releasing toxins into the water." Find out more via our community contributor Sherol Nelson Embry of the +East Bay Regional Park District. 
Blue-green algae are increasing due to drought and climbing temperatures causing closures of popular swim areas. Find out about where they are and what's being done about them.
7
3
kia inkognito's profile photoAmanda Wright's profile photo
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Electricity Bills Set to Rise for Millions of Californians

"Electricity bills for millions of Californians could be on the rise, depending on what state energy regulators decide on Friday. It would be the most sweeping overhaul of electricity rates in more than a decade.

Regulators at the California Public Utilities Commission are expected to decide between two competing plans that would change electricity prices for customers of Pacific Gas & Electric, Southern California Edison and San Diego Gas & Electric."
State regulators will overhaul electricity prices at the request of utilities, but environmentalists and consumer advocates worry about the setbacks to solar power and low-income ratepayers.
12
3
Ian Atkinson's profile photoPaul “Fidalgo” Thompson's profile photoLuke Vaughan's profile photoVictoria Hudson's profile photo
2 comments
 
+John Enfield Environmentalists don't care how much energy people use as long as it isn't causing too much damage.
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
Sinkholes Offer Glimpse Into Comet's Heart

"Strange pits and divots observed on the surface of Ccomet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko may be sinkholes, not unlike those that appear on Earth, a new analysis suggests." Read more from Space.
Strange pits and divots observed on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko may be sinkholes, not unlike those that appear on Earth, a new analysis suggests.
24
3
Byron Bradford's profile photoGusti Istiani's profile photo
Add a comment...

KQED SCIENCE

Shared publicly  - 
 
These 'Resurrection Plants' Spring Back to Life in Seconds

Scientists say the genes in these “resurrection plants” could one day protect crops from drought. Watch our new ‪#‎DeepLook‬ video!
Scientists say the genes in these “resurrection plants” could one day protect crops from drought.
18
2
Rick Wolf's profile photoTia McCarthy's profile photoLady Durza Nightshade Black's profile photo
 
Granny had one in a bowl for 'the children' to be amazed by. Back in '63
Add a comment...
People
Have them in circles
370,589 people
pall griffin's profile photo
Ana Rivera's profile photo
Jose Menjivar's profile photo
becky dam's profile photo
Isela Mata's profile photo
Tess Bashaw's profile photo
Lisa Marie Taylor's profile photo
Chris Wallo's profile photo
Cody Cenner's profile photo
Communities
Story
Tagline
Explore science, nature and environment stories from the Bay Area and beyond with KQED Science.
Introduction
Stay informed about the latest science news, trends and events with KQED Science. And explore the Bay Area through stories from QUEST, a science, nature and environment multimedia series produced in collaboration with KQED and other PBS stations.