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Jyoti Q Dahiya
19,809 followers -
"Space, the final front ear!"
"Space, the final front ear!"

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Space | Outfits for Mars

Why aesthetics matter, even if the technology is likely to stick to 'tried-and-tested'.

Thanks for sharing, +Michael Interbartolo

#Space #Spacesuits
The age old stand off between pressurized bladder suits and mechanical compression suits
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Space | The largest volcanic deposit in the solar system

... is on Mars. Where else? It's the same planet that has the biggest volcano, the monstrous Olympus Mons, so big, it's like a pimple on a face.

Thanks to +rasha kamel for sharing.

#Space #Mars #Volcano #Vulcanism
"Explosive volcanic eruptions that shot jets of hot ash, rock and gas skyward are the likely source of a mysterious Martian rock formation, a new study finds. The new finding could add to scientists' understanding of Mars's interior and its past potential for habitability, according to the study's authors.

The Medusae Fossae Formation is a massive, unusual deposit of soft rock near Mars's equator, with undulating hills and abrupt mesas. Scientists first observed the Medusae Fossae with NASA's Mariner spacecraft in the 1960s but were perplexed as to how it formed.

Now, new research suggests the formation was deposited during explosive volcanic eruptions on the Red Planet more than 3 billion years ago. The formation is about one-fifth as large as the continental United States and 100 times more massive than the largest explosive volcanic deposit on Earth, making it the largest known explosive volcanic deposit in the solar system, according to the study's authors.

"This is a massive deposit, not only on a Martian scale, but also in terms of the solar system, because we do not know of any other deposit that is like this," said Lujendra Ojha, a planetary scientist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and lead author of the new study published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

Formation of the Medusae Fossae would have marked a pivotal point in Mars's history, according to the study's authors. The eruptions that created the deposit could have spewed massive amounts of climate-altering gases into Mars's atmosphere and ejected enough water to cover Mars in a global ocean more than 9 centimeters (4 inches) thick, Ojha said.

Greenhouse gases exhaled during the eruptions that spawned the Medusae Fossae could have warmed Mars's surface enough for water to remain liquid at its surface, but toxic volcanic gases like hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide would have altered the chemistry of Mars's surface and atmosphere. Both processes would have affected Mars's potential for habitability, Ojha said".

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Gender | A website on Indian scientists

That they are all women makes it cooler.

Thanks for sharing, +Kam-Yung Soh

#Gender #IndianScientists
"Two science journalists in India continue to build on The Life of Science [ https://thelifeofscience.com/ ], a multimedia website that they designed and launched in 2016 to highlight the research and lives of more than 100 women in the country.

The site, founded and run by Nandita Jayaraj and Aashima Dogra, aims to chronicle the scientists’ experiences in the lab and field. Jayaraj and Dogra, who work full-time on the site, compile feature stories, blogposts, podcasts, video and picture features about the women, whose work spans the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).
[...]
Each scientist’s story offers a glimpse into her world — from the physical environment in which she lives and works, to the nature of her research and how she reached her present position. “I particularly like how the narratives let us see the woman behind the science and scientific journey,” says Vidita Vaidya, a neuroscientist at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research in Mumbai, who is featured on the site.

The site showcases India’s diverse research landscape. Some of the scientists work with state-of-the-art equipment such as dilution refrigerators, confocal microscopes and high-performance computing clusters; others make the most of sparse funds and scant supplies.

Yet the stories’ common threads resonate with many others who aspire to, or are navigating, a scientific career: the struggles to balance family life and career, and to counter bias and stereotypes."

+Jyoti Q Dahiya
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A website on Indian scientists

That they are all women is a bonus... Check it out: https://thelifeofscience.com/

Thanks for sharing, +Kam-Yung Soh

#Scientists #India #women
"Two science journalists in India continue to build on The Life of Science [ https://thelifeofscience.com/ ], a multimedia website that they designed and launched in 2016 to highlight the research and lives of more than 100 women in the country.

The site, founded and run by Nandita Jayaraj and Aashima Dogra, aims to chronicle the scientists’ experiences in the lab and field. Jayaraj and Dogra, who work full-time on the site, compile feature stories, blogposts, podcasts, video and picture features about the women, whose work spans the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).
[...]
Each scientist’s story offers a glimpse into her world — from the physical environment in which she lives and works, to the nature of her research and how she reached her present position. “I particularly like how the narratives let us see the woman behind the science and scientific journey,” says Vidita Vaidya, a neuroscientist at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research in Mumbai, who is featured on the site.

The site showcases India’s diverse research landscape. Some of the scientists work with state-of-the-art equipment such as dilution refrigerators, confocal microscopes and high-performance computing clusters; others make the most of sparse funds and scant supplies.

Yet the stories’ common threads resonate with many others who aspire to, or are navigating, a scientific career: the struggles to balance family life and career, and to counter bias and stereotypes."

+Jyoti Q Dahiya
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Space | Dark and stormy Jupiter

It was a dark and stormy ... Jupiter ... caught on camera by the Juno spacecraft.

The bright portions are storms (cyclones, rotating anti-clockwise) and the dark ones are anti-cyclones. So, dark and stormy is not just a cliche, but an actual description. To know more, check out the link.

Thanks, +NASA

#Juno #Jupiter #NASA
The magnificent Jupiter. Since 2016, our Juno spacecraft has been gracing us with beautiful images of the giant gas planet's chaotic vortices and penetrating its deep, colorful zones and belts in a quest to reveal its origin story: https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/jpl/dark-and-stormy-jupiter
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Gender | The very first scientist

It's troublesome and true that the popular image of 'scientist' is a man in a lab coat.

So, it's good to know that the very first 'scientist' in the world was Mary Somerville, "a Scottish researcher whose erudite books brought together previously disparate fields of mathematics, astronomy, geology, chemistry, and physics so clearly that the texts became the backbone of Cambridge University’s first science curriculum. [In 1834, the Cambridge don William Whewell] called Somerville a scientist, in part because “man of science” seemed inappropriate for a woman, but more significantly because Somerville’s work was interdisciplinary."

We need to know more about this remarkable person.

Thanks for sharing, +David Joyner

#Science #Gender #Inequity *MarySomerville
Interesting article illustrating bias in science against women, thanks to brainpickings.org:
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Materials | Fluorite again

More lovely fluorite crystals, this time with specks of heart-attack red ... from what exactly, I'm not sure.

Thanks, +Geology Page

#GeologyPage #Fluorite #Crystal
Fluorite | #Geology #GeologyPage #Mineral

Locality: Schacht 78 Mine, Frohnau, Annaberg, Saxony, Germany

Size: 6.5 × 8.6 × 4 cm
Largest Crystal: 0.80cm

Photo Copyright ©Wittig Minerals /e-rocks.com

Geology Page
www.geologypage.com
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Materials | Fluorite and Sphalerite

Another beautiful crystal from +Geology Page.

#Fluorite #Sphalerite #GeologyPage
Fluorite on Sphalerite | #Geology #GeologyPage #Mineral

Locality: Illinois, USA
Size: 6 x 4.6 x 3.5 cm

Photo Copyright © DI Anton Watzl

Geology Page
www.geologypage.com
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Space | Colliding galaxies

The collision is mainly between the gases of the two galaxies. Individual stars usually just sweep by haughtily.

These two are likely to merge as a result of the collision.

Via +Anand Sankar

#Space #Galaxies #CollidingGalaxies
The Clash of NGC 3256

Image Credit & License: NASA, ESA, Hubble Space Telescope

Explanation: Marked by an unusually bright central region, swirling dust lanes, and far flung tidal tails, peculiar NGC 3256 is the aftermath of a truly cosmic collision. The 500 million year old clash of two separate galaxies spans some 100 thousand light-years in this sharp Hubble view. Of course when two galaxies collide, individual stars rarely do. Giant galactic clouds of molecular gas and dust do interact though, and produce spectacular bursts of star formation. In this galaxy clash, the two original spiral galaxies had similar masses. Their disks are no longer distinct and the two galactic nuclei are hidden by obscuring dust. On the timescale of a few hundred million years the nuclei will likely also merge as NGC 3256 becomes a single large elliptical galaxy. NGC 3256 itself is nearly 100 million light-years distant toward the southern sailing constellation Vela. The frame includes many even more distant background galaxies and spiky foreground stars.
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Dinosaurs | T Rex was too polite to stick out a tongue

Well, not exactly out of politeness, but sheer inability.

New research shows that most dinos, like T Rex, had tongues like crocs, not tongues like birds, and certainly not tongues like apes... :-P

#GeologyPage #Dinosaurs #TRex #Evolution #Tongues
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