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Jyoti Q Dahiya
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Jyoti Q Dahiya

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Space | Pluto

The probe will reach by July this year. The data will take to the end of next year. At the speed of light. With a distance of 4.5 light hours.

It's all about the memory and bandwidth, and the battery. Sounds like your mobile, doesn't it?

Via +Betsy McCall
Betsy McCall originally shared:
 
Nasa’s New Horizons spaceship has travelled billions of miles in nine years to answer astronomers’ questions about the tiny world
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Jyoti Q Dahiya

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Free book. Since I haven't downloaded and read it myself, you're on your own... :)

Via Bill Frisbee.
 
The Return
Last day to get it free at http://bit.ly/1tg2yHJ2 !
Only two outgunned and outnumbered pilots were there to hold the line against the enemy while the colony of New Alamo escaped.

When the battle was over the enemy fleet was shattered and Luke Kishi had lost the love of his life. She had made him promise to live and he would keep that promise. However, on the other end of the wormhole an alien civilization awaited them. It was a harsh and unforgiving society and Luke became a mercenary, fighting for the ruling Topa.

Wishing for death, but honor bound to live; Luke receives a mission that sends him to a distant corner of the Conglomerate. The Topa have plans within plans and Luke has to find something worth living for besides honor or the human race will rendered extinct.
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Space | Partial lunar eclipse

A partial lunar eclipse will be visible around sunset on 4 April. You may not notice the difference, though, since it's pretty faint.

Unless you live in the Americas. They get to see a blood moon for a few minutes. Lucky things.

Via +Elizabeth Therese Niwel 

#space   #lunareclipse  
 
Is this the third of four Blood Moon eclipses?   
Depending on the algorithm being used, the April 4 lunar eclipse can be regarded as a very shallow total lunar eclipse or a very deep partial lunar eclipse. The eclipse master, Fred Espenak, assures us that it’s actually a total eclipse of very short duration, despite some sites calling it a partial eclipse. Good thing, or else this April 4 eclipse wouldn’t rate as a so-called Blood Moon. This eclipse counts as the third in a series of four straight total lunar eclipses – a lunar tetrad – all of which are visible from North America!  
Who will see a partial lunar eclipse? A partial lunar eclipse precedes the total eclipse for one hour and 42 minutes, and follows totality for one hour and 42 minutes.  
So, from start to finish, the moon takes 3 hours and 29 minutes to totally cross Earth’s dark umbral shadow. Eastern North America and western South America can see beginning stages of the partial umbral eclipse low in the west before sunrise April 4, whereas middle Asia (India, western China, mid-Asian Russia) can view the ending stages of the partial umbral eclipse low in the east after sunset April 4. Greenland, Iceland, Europe, Africa and the Middle East won’t be able see this eclipse at all.  
Incidentally, a very light penumbral eclipse comes before and after the dark (umbral) stage of the lunar eclipse. But this sort of eclipse is so faint that many people won’t even notice it. The penumbral eclipse would be more fun to watch from the moon, where it would be seen as a partial eclipse of the sun.  

What causes a lunar eclipse? A lunar eclipse can only happen at full moon. Only then is it possible for the moon to be directly opposite the sun in our sky, and to pass into the Earth’s dark umbral shadow. Most of the time, however, the full moon eludes the Earth’s shadow by swinging to the north of it, or south of it. For instance, the March 2015 full moon swung south of the Earth’s shadow. Next month – in May 2015 – the full moon will swing north of the Earth’s shadow.  
The moon’s orbital plane around Earth is actually inclined at 5o to the ecliptic – Earth’s orbital plane around the sun. However, the moon’s orbit intersects the ecliptic at two points called nodes. It’s an ascending node where it crosses the Earth’s orbital plane going from south to north, and a descending node where it crosses the Earth’s orbital plane, going from north to south.  
In short, a lunar eclipse happens when the full moon closely coincides with one of its nodes, and a solar eclipse happens when a new moon does likewise. It’s not a perfect alignment this time around, with the moon crossing its ascending node about 9 hours before the moon turns full. But that’s close enough for the moon to stage a total lunar eclipse, even if it happens to be the shortest one of the 21st century!

By Bruce McClure
EARTH-SKY 

Image:
Animation of the 2015 April 4 total lunar eclipse. The moon travels eastward through the Earth’s penumbra (light outside shadow) and umbra (dark inner shadow) shadow. The yellow line depicts the ecliptic – Earth’s orbital plane. Although the moon, at least in part, spends about 3.5 hours within the umbra, it is only totally submerged in the umbra (dark shadow) for a short while, or less than 5 minutes.
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+Jyoti Q Dahiya - Ouch.
I had missed the eclipse, but Full Moon for a few moments I have seen this time. One of this days I will post some of them.
But, ... I also haven't seen much of any last full Moon photos on G+ yet,  will looking for them, though.   :)
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Space | Mars probes

Mangalyaan is also well beyond its 6-month design life. Let's see how long these two finally last.

Via +Kam-Yung Soh 
 
*Ah, to see Opportunity still working then; just watch out for its drill...};-)*
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Space | The first space smuggler

... was not jailed, though there was a Congressional (lower house) investigation in the USA, and he had to promise never to do it again.

Via +Randy Culler 
 
Just about two hours into Gemini 3, NASA's first two-man spaceflight 50 years ago, John Young reached into his spacesuit's pocket and pulled out a surprise. "Where did that come from?" replied Gus Grissom, Gemini 3 commander.
Just about two hours into Gemini 3, NASA's first two-man spaceflight 50 years ago, John Young reached into his spacesuit's pocket and pulled out a surprise. "Where did that come from?" replied Gus Grissom, Gemini 3 commander.
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He was the first, but not the last.  :) 
Funny celebration it is, though.    :)
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Free science fiction | +Mary S. Sheppard

Seems like an interesting premise!
(Note: I haven't yet downloaded/read the book myself; you're on your own there).

#sciencefiction  
 
The next book in this series comes out tomorrow, so I am offering the first book free this month at iTunes, Barnes&Noble and Smashwords. 

Amy had always been dedicated to her job as a biochemist at BioTime Labs. It was the kind of work one could get dedicated to – saving the world, or least, curing diseases that afflicted the people of her time, in 2066. The plants whose chemical composition could provide such remedies are now extinct so one had to travel though time. Amy was not supposed to be one of the first time travelers
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Jyoti Q Dahiya

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Space | Earth, with a 'belt of Venus'

The aliens have landed, and are looking for their keys so that they can go back.

No, no, these are trees frozen in Lapland. But don't miss the belt of Venus.

Via +Astronomy Picture of the Day (APoD)

#space #earth
 
Sentinels of the Arctic
Image Credit & Copyright: Niccolò Bonfadini
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150412.html

Who guards the north? Judging from the above photograph, possibly giant trees covered in snow and ice. The featured picture was taken a few winters ago in Finnish Lapland where weather can include sub-freezing temperatures and driving snow. Surreal landscapes sometimes result, where common trees become cloaked in white and so appear, to some, as watchful aliens. Far in the distance, behind this uncommon Earthly vista, is a more common sight -- a Belt of Venus that divided a darkened from sunlit sky as the Sun rose behind the photographer. Of course, in the spring, the trees thaw and Lapland looks much different.
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Thank you so much for linking me back to the APOD site. I can waste spend hours in there.
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Jyoti Q Dahiya

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Which country 's flag is this, quick?

Via +Kam-Yung Soh
 
A Flag Shaped Aurora over Sweden
Image Credit & Copyright: Mia Stålnacke
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150330.html

It appeared, momentarily, like a 50-km tall banded flag. In mid-March, an energetic Coronal Mass Ejection directed toward a clear magnetic channel to Earth led to one of the more intense geomagnetic storms of recent years. A visual result was wide spread auroras being seen over many countries near Earth's magnetic poles. Captured over Kiruna, Sweden, the image features an unusually straight auroral curtain with the green color emitted low in the Earth's atmosphere, and red many kilometers higher up. It is unclear where the rare purple aurora originates, but it might involve an unusual blue aurora at an even lower altitude than the green, seen superposed with a much higher red. As the Sun continues near its top level of surface activity, colorful nights of auroras over Earth are likely to continue.
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He he, it's not a real flag, +Thex Dar​. 
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Jyoti Q Dahiya

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Free books!

Enjoy +Marva Dasef 's books.
 
Last #Free Kindle Ebooks Ever
Since I have three ebooks still under the Kindle Select plan, I'll use up the free days for them all this month. Here's the freebie schedule: March 27th-31st: Faizah's Destiny - The Tales of Abu Nuwas 2 March 29th-31st: Lemons and Other Kid Tales Fish Story...
Since I have three ebooks still under the Kindle Select plan, I'll use up the free days for them all this month. Here's the freebie schedule: March 27th-31st: Faizah's Destiny - The Tales of Abu Nuwas 2 March 29th-31st: Lem...
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Jyoti Q Dahiya

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Space | Jupiter

A giant magnet the size of the biggest planet in the system, spinning once every 10 hours or so, does not need the Sun's helpful solar wind to generate its auroras, unlike the piddly little Earth.

In fact, Jupiter has put its moons on the job, and the poor things are stuck with it. Ganymede has its own magnetic field, Io chucks one ton of sulphur and oxygen at Jupiter every second, and Europa is doing something but nobody quite knows how it fulfils its geas.

Via Planetary Landscapes on facebook.
On Earth the aurora is intimately connected to solar activity. High speed electrons and protons from the sun find their way into the upper atmosphere by following invisible lines of magnetic force ...
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Space | Double eclipse

This composite photo would have the Sun in stitches. It's a double eclipse, with both the Moon and the International Space Station eclipsing the Sun, seen here with flares and prominences. In other words, a normal day for the Sun. It really isn't affected by all the local hoopla.

Via +Astronomy Picture of the Day (APoD) 

#space   #solareclipse   #internationalspacestation  
 
A Double Eclipse of the Sun
Image Credit & Copyright: Thierry Legault
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150322.html

Can the Sun be eclipsed twice at the same time? Last Friday was noteworthy because part of the Earth was treated to a rare total eclipse of the Sun. But also on Friday, from a part of the Earth that only saw part of the Sun eclipsed, a second object appeared simultaneously in front of the Sun: the Earth-orbiting International Space Station. Although space station eclipses are very quick -- in this case only 0.6 seconds, they are not so rare. Capturing this composite image took a lot of planning and a little luck, as the photographer had to dodge a series of third objects that kept, annoyingly, also lining up in front of the Sun: clouds. The above superposed time-lapse sequence was taken from Fregenal de la Sierra in southern Spain. The dark disk of the Moon dominates the lower right, while the Sun's textured surface shows several filaments and, over an edge, a prominence.
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Have them in circles
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"Space, the final front ear!"
Introduction
Science fiction fan, voracious reader, loves puns, cartoons and pretty photos, and anything sciencey.
If you want to be added to my circles, check this and let me know which circles interest you.


Bragging rights
Made it easier for people worldwide to take their spare tyre out of the boot; was the first person to realise software could be sold with advertising (was in print with this before hotmail was launched). Neither my spouse nor my kid hates me yet.
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