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Cop attacks high school student for not tucking-in his shirt.


Here's some further information on the officer:
Cop who beat student for untucked shirt jailed on rape charges
Apparently he's a rapist and a murderer. Holy shit.
http://www.pixiq.com/article/cop-who-beat-student-for-untucked-shirt-jailed-on-rape-charges
America's finest police state enforcers at work protecting and serving the shit out of special education students.
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5 comments
 
+Natoya Rose There's an important distinction here that most people don't seem to recognize, and you went ahead and implied it in your own choice of words.

"if you are a psychopath then being a police officer is the likely career you chose."

I don't know whether or not I believe in the old saying that power corrupts people. I think what's far more common and likely is that only the corrupt seek power in the first place.

Civilization is at an inflection point. Social paradigms in the way society organizes itself are going to change dramatically in the (relatively) near future. This distinction may seem small, but I actually think it's one of the most important for us to keep in mind as we move forward.
 
"I think what's far more common and likely is that only the corrupt seek power in the first place."

I've gotten to know a number of people who wanted to be cops. Some were doing it because it has good benefits. Some were on a power trip. But most thought it was good honorable work.

I've also worked with a number of ex-cops, and the job can certainly change people. But it doesn't change everyone, and about the only thing I can say with any certainty is that you can't make sweeping statements about cops.
 
I've been learning more and more lately about how the good ones are weeded out. Justin Bale has posted a couple links recently related to that issue. I don't doubt that good people try to join up and do good things, but it's obvious to me that most don't stick.
 
+Natoya Rose So who is making sweeping statements???

"I think what's far more common and likely is that only the corrupt seek power in the first place."

That's a huge broom right there.

But whatever, haters gonna hate; most "fuck the police" threads are smug anecdotal circle-jerks.
 
First, what I said wasn't meant to apply exclusively to police.

Second, it doesn't apply to all police, only those who are there seeking power for themselves, and I see it as tautological truth when comparing all possible motives for seeking power against the concept of corruption.

Third, I understand the criticism of anecdote-based arguments, but complaints about police are not based on isolated incidents. There are very frequent and widespread trends and very strong similarities in every case that point to institutional problems, not just a large number of individually bad officers. For instance, there is rarely a public apology even when caught red handed and no matter how badly people were harmed. Their superiors always deny wrong-doing, no matter how blatant the incident, and they almost always lie about context. A victim of police abuse is always accused of being responsible for whatever happened, and they always make false claims about the behavior of the victim when trying to make this case (in fact, I have never ever seen a case where official handling of an incident didn't hinge on this). Fellow officers almost always mishandle procedure and evidence in order to get the case thrown out of court. There are countless testimonies from former police or those who never even made it past training being fired or harassed into quitting after their peers and superiors try to pressure them into corrupt behavior. Police abuses are always committed with other officers present and complicit in the behavior, especially at protests where you would think a "good cop" would at some point criticize a "bad cop" for going overboard... but I don't think such a thing has ever EVER been witnessed. I could go on but I've run out of time to write this and I think that should be sufficient. These behaviors are all indicative of issues that run deeper than simply a large number of isolated stories about cops behaving badly.