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Jukka Laurila
Lives in Zürich, Switzerland
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Jukka Laurila

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Google's source control system: probably the largest monolithic version control repository in the world.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W71BTkUbdqE
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How modern computer chips are made. Fascinating stuff!
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The car industry is slowly waking up to the fact that if you take a computer and connect it to the internet, you will be subject to the same forces as anyone else connecting computers to the internet. Those computers will be targeted and you had better invest serious effort into securing them.

Why on earth are the internet-connected components of the car not air-gapped from the components responsible for driving safety completely baffles me.
 
"As the two hackers remotely toyed with the air-conditioning, radio, and windshield wipers, I mentally congratulated myself on my courage under pressure. That’s when they cut the transmission.

Immediately my accelerator stopped working. As I frantically pressed the pedal and watched the RPMs climb, the Jeep lost half its speed, then slowed to a crawl. This occurred just as I reached a long overpass, with no shoulder to offer an escape. The experiment had ceased to be fun."

"[T]he attack on the entertainment system seems to work on any Chrysler vehicle with Uconnect from late 2013, all of 2014, and early 2015"

A zero-day vulnerability that allows an attacker anywhere with an Internet connection control pretty much everything in the car, including braking and gas pedal and to some extend steering.

And what Chrysler, the manufacturer, is doing is trying to silence the hackers, not halt the fleet until the fix is deployed.
I was driving 70 mph on the edge of downtown St. Louis when the exploit began to take hold.
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Oh, wow. Properly internalizing this on a deep level could be one of the most valuable mental shifts for me in a while.

> Advertisements and media often push the narrative that the purpose of all our toil is to win a chance at relaxation. We're supposed to work hard at boring jobs in order to earn our vacations. We're supposed to work hard for decades so that we can retire. (We're supposed to conceive of heaven as a place where nobody does anything except lounge on clouds.)

> I call bullshit. For almost everybody, inaction is boring. That's why we pick up books, go exploring, and take up hobbies. The ground state is an active state, not a passive one.

> The actual reward state is not one where you're lazing around doing nothing. It's one where you're keeping busy, where you're doing things that stimulate you, and where you're resting only a fraction of the time. The preferred ground state is not one where you have no activity to partake in, it's one where you're managing the streams of activity precisely, and moving through them at the right pace: not too fast, but also not too slow. For that would be boring.

> And yet, most people have this model of the world where whenever they're not resting, they're taking damage. When the homework isn't done, they're taking damage. When they're reading a textbook, they're taking damage. When they go to sleep with work unfinished, they're taking damage. When they're at a large social event, they're taking damage. Some part of them yearns to be in the rest state, where they don't need to do all these things, and insofar as they aren't, they're suffering a little.

> This is a grave error, in a world where the work is never finished, where the tasks are neverending.
Many people seem to think the 'good' state of being, the 'ground' state, is a relaxed state, a state with lots of rest and very little action. Because they think the ground state is the relaxed state, they act like...
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Recreating photos in the style of famous artists

In another example of how Deep Neural Networks (DNNs) can be used to create interesting works of art, a group of German researchers have released the paper, A Neural Algorithm of Artistic Style (http://goo.gl/HsFR0C), that introduces a system that renders an input photo in the artistic style of a given piece of art while preserving its overall content.

In their paper, the authors describe how the representations of content and style in their Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) are separable, making it possible to use neural representations to separate and recombine content and style of arbitrary input images. To learn more, read the full paper. For access to their algorithm, visit http://goo.gl/jB7ovU
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This is brilliant in so many ways. I laughed so much it hurt :)
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New Horizons is now close enough to Pluto to get better photos than Hubble did. Closest approach coming up in 12 days. Exciting!
 
Pluto Rising

New Horizons is closing in on Pluto, and that means we’re finally getting some detailed images of the small world. With the appearance of new surface features comes a new batch of questions.

The latest comes from a new color images of Pluto and Charon. The images were created by combining high resolution images from the Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LoRRI) with color data from RALPH. What’s clear is that there is a chain of features along the equator of Pluto. Whether these are features similar to the equatorial region of Iapetus or some type of cryovolcanic activity is still not clear. It’s also clear from the image that Pluto and Charon are quite different in both color and brightness. Given that the two bodies are thought to have formed from a collision with another body, it will be interesting to see how they can be so different.

We’re still in the speculation stage, since the data is so new, but the exciting thing about these images is that Pluto is no longer a spot a few pixels wide. It’s a world with clear features and with mysteries to be revealed. We’re finally exploring everyone’s favorite little world, and that’s a huge scientific achievement.

New Horizons will make its closest approach on July 14, so we can expect a flurry of images leading up to that time. Of  course it will take months for the all the data to be transmitted back to Earth, so long after the flyby we’ll Pluto is going to be rising in the news.
New Horizons is closing in on Pluto, and that means we're finally getting some detailed images of the small world.
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Now you can generate your own dreamy neural net image

#deepdream  

For those of you who liked the post I shared a couple of weeks ago about the images generated by neural nets (old post: https://plus.google.com/+JeffDean/posts/jVBUgDxhbRd), I'm happy to announce that Alexander Mordvintsev, +Christopher Olah , and Mike Tyka have put together an open-source iPython notebook containing the code that generates these images, and you can play around with it on your own images.  (Note: this notebook depends on a few other packages, so you have to have enough persistence to install numpy and caffe to get this to work).  The iPython notebook is at https://github.com/google/deepdream, but see the blog post linked to by this post for details.

The blog post asks that people tag images they generate and share with #deepdream , so I suspect you can keep looking at that tag to see all kinds of weird and wonderful images.

Have fun, everyone!
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squeee! Adam Savage interviewing my new favorite author, Andy Weir! 
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Ooh, goody. #readlater  

William Gibson, The Art of Fiction No. 211 - The Paris Review
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Zürich, Switzerland
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Haapajärvi, Finland - Janakkala, Finland - Helsinki, Finland
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The beef carpaccio was possibly the best I've ever had, and I've had a few. Absolutely delightful!
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
The omelette was delicious!
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
What a delight! I liked a lot the real 747-100 cockpit where you can try sitting in the pilot's seat and have a knowledgeable volunteer explain what all the knobs do and what all the dials mean. I've visited quite a few museums related to aviation, but still there was a lot that was new to me such as the unmanned airship-airplane hybrid Avitor which is quite possibly the most steampunk thing I have ever seen. Recommended for anyone interested in airplanes, helicopters, gliders or jetpacks.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Tasty, fast, convenient, expensive.
Food: Very GoodDecor: Very GoodService: Very Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
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The donuts are tasty, but be sure to check what they are charging you. I got charged 1.60 for each while the price tag on the shelf (with a photo of exactly that kind of donut) said they cost 1.30. I complained but they just said the price was wrong. I didn't bother pressing the point since it was such a trivial amount of money, but it still left me feeling slightly scammed.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Delicious sushi and interesting fusion rolls!
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Unpretentious and reasonably priced but the food is still great. I had the Roghan Josh with garlic naan and I can heartily recommend it.
Food: ExcellentDecor: Very GoodService: Very Good
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago