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Judy G Gluten-Free
130 followers -
most delicious gluten-free pizza
most delicious gluten-free pizza

130 followers
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Visit Canada's largest gluten free event to discover, sample, and save on hundreds of gluten free products! Leading experts will also on site to share information and answer questions.

This year's Vancouver Expo is double the size, double the days, and double the fun!

Tickets available online for $12 while quantities lasts, limited number of advanced tickets available. Tickets available for $15 (cash) at the door. Children ages 10 or under get in free and must be supervised by an adult.

+Gluten Free Expo 
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Doctors

Around the time when +Eugenia Loli and I got married, she started to get sick with severe digestive issues.

She saw quite a few doctors over the years. She had tests done in several hospitals. We lost count of the number of times she visited medical labs. She tried quite a few long-shot treatments, and none of those worked. Several doctors suggested that the issue was simply mental stress. Nobody in the medical profession was able to figure out what her problem actually was.

Eventually, after 10 years, she stumbled across a description of a highly restrictive diet that seemed to work for other people with similar symptoms, and that diet worked for her as well. Working from there, she eventually figured out that her problem was gluten, and that she simply had to avoid wheat products.

Over 10 years, the doctors she saw would consistently order tests and prescribe drugs. The notion that her digestive problems could be tied to the foods that she ate was never strongly present. None of the doctors she saw suggested trying to cut individual ingredients that were commonly suspected of causing such symptoms. Tests and drugs.

Enter 23andMe. Eugenia was feeling much better after cutting gluten from her diet. She sent a saliva sample, which cost us less what a family doctor charges for a routine office visit. There was a single highlight where her profile differed significantly from the general population: an increased correlation with gluten sensitivity.

Medicine isn't an exact science. It's more like detective work. Seen with my software engineering eyes, it reminds me a lot of debugging, where all the clues might matter.

I'm a bit bummed at the spat between the FDA and 23andMe. I tend to take it somewhat personally. The FDA is siding with the doctors who were unable to diagnose what was wrong with my wife, who ordered more drugs and more lab work and more hospital tests, who cost us time, money, anguish. The FDA is trying to cut access to the cheap and non-intrusive test that gave a strong and precise clue of the root cause of what was going on, that no other means were able to detect.

Had 23andMe been available a decade earlier, maybe Eugenia would have avoided a miserable decade. Maybe a doctor would have used that data to say "you should try to go gluten-free for a month", or would have correlated that genetic clue with the fact that Eugenia's symptoms were consistent with gluten intolerance.

It's one cheap test, one potential clue to help doctors "debug" a patient, and I hope that the FDA and 23andMe can reach a point where it becomes an accepted medical tool that doctors can use to make appropriate decisions and provide better advice.
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You can help +Jennifer Brea make the +Canary in a Coal Mine film even better by backing her Kickstarter project.

You have until Friday, 22nd November to participate. $1 and you're in. Check out the limited edition Sarah Allegra art prints.
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Calgary at night, shining in the foothills of the Rockies. Nose Hill Park really stands out.
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This Calgary Celiac Association organised week of camp offers: fully gluten free kitchen; is for children ages 7 to 16; is open to all members in Alberta, and their siblings.

Tons of amazing activities—archery, swimming, high/low ropes...and much more! Exceptional camper/counsellor ratios. Parents are welcome to chaperone (additional fee).

Registration starts on March 14 with an open house at 7pm. Membership is required. New members welcome!

403-237-0304
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I'll be exhibiting at the Gluten-Free Expo in Calgary at the end of March. If your going too, stop by and say 'hi'.

The Gluten Free Expo is the largest gluten free event in Canada. Whether you’re looking for products that taste great or trying to learn how to cook and bake to meet your dietary needs, the Expo is the place to be! Come see what it is all about…

In addition to featuring a variety of gluten free products available for sampling and purchase.  There is also a public stage with sessions pertaining to gluten free living throughout the day for your enjoyment.
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Gluten Be Gone: Synthetic Biology Solution for Celiac Disease

What is Celiac Disease? Celiac disease or gluten allergy comes from eating wheat, rye or barley. Most common in people of N. European descent, the symptoms include diarrhea, weight loss and an increased risk of cancer. 

Why is gluten allergenic? Gluten contains an unusual protein called alpha gliadin, which has many repeats of the amino acids Proline and Glutamine (PQ motifs) that are resistant to the digestive enzymes in our stomach. In some people, these PQ-rich fragments cause severe allergy and inflammation.  

Clinical trials: A natural bacterial enzyme from Sphingomonas capsulata that can break down PQ motifs is in clinical trials as an Oral Enzyme Therapeutic. But it works poorly in the acidic compartment of our stomach, and attempts to engineer it to become acid tolerant have not worked. 

Trial by Acid: Univ. Washington undergraduates tackled the problem from the opposite direction. They found an enzyme called Kumamolysin-AS in a heat and acid loving bacterium Alicyclobacillus sendaiensis that was already acid tolerant. They tinkered with it, using the Fold-It protein folding game, until they found variants predicted to change the enzyme’s preference from Proline Arginine (PR) to Proline Glutamine (PQ). When they made and tested ~260 engineered enzymes, they found one that had a 116-fold increase in ability to digest the gluten peptide in acidic conditions, with a switch in preference of 800-fold! The new enzyme, KumaMAX, could be used in oral therapy or engineered into common bacteria found in yogurt to make probiotics.

So Much Win!: This work (1) could help millions of gluten allergy sufferers world wide, (2) was done by undergraduates competing in iGEM, an annual synthetic biology competition originally founded at MIT, (3) using gaming software, (4) built on basic research done on an obscure bacterial enzyme, and (5) published with student authors in a peer-reviewed journal. 

Images: Normal catalytic triad of protease enyzmes (left) and acid tolerant substitution (right) found in bacteria growing in acid, hot springs (middle).

Paper: Computational Design of an α‑Gliadin Peptidase; Gordon et al., (2012) JACS 134, 20513−20520

Team UW iGEMhttp://goo.gl/vgvTX

#ScienceSunday   #syntheticbiology   
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I'll be offering free samples along with 100 other exhibitors in Vancouver at the Gluten-Free Expo on Sunday. You can buy a ticket on the door - you should come and say 'Hi!'
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At the Calgary Celiac Market with Casey, Giselle and the other vendors. Fun.
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Picky Bitchez at the Calgary Celiac Market
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This is convenient: order some Judy G pizza and get it delivered to your doorstep. Plus, one free entry into the Big Summer Chill contest with each item purchased until the end of the month.
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