Profile

Cover photo
Joshua Roy
Works at ASC Group, Inc.
Attended University of Pittsburgh: Graduate School of Public Health
Lives in Columbus, Ohio
8,018 followers|1,307,312 views
AboutPosts

Stream

Joshua Roy

Shared publicly  - 
 
We have 40,000 suicides per year, of which 6,500 of them are veterans. 24% of men and 2% of women are veterans, and considering that men are more likely to commit suicide than women, we should expect to see a sizable population of people who are veterans and end up committing suicide by these basic statistics alone.

It isn't so much that veterans are incredibly likely to commit suicide, it is just that we have a lot of them and people in general commit suicide for about 30 in 100,000 individuals.

What this number does reveal is how safe they've become overseas while on duty. They have a higher chance of succumbing to self-harm from psychological depression as a US citizen than they do from an enemy's bullet while overseas during war. 

Actually, if you look at the death rates on an assignment basis, it was safer to be stationed in certain bases in Afghanistan than it was to be a normal citizen in the streets of some US cities. 
8
Theodore Minick's profile photoMatt Spaanem (Mutedog)'s profile photoBrendan McNerney's profile photo
3 comments
 
Sad sad sad
Add a comment...

Joshua Roy

Shared publicly  - 
 
It would be an interesting vacation, but I don't know what I'd do with all those used books. Maybe if I ever build a library...
From Chicago to Los Angeles, get your kicks on Route 66 with these 66 independent used bookstores.
3
1
Alan Bombria's profile photoJoshua Roy's profile photoSusanna Perkins's profile photo
4 comments
 
+Alan Bombria - At $0.80 a mile on that uhaul rental, we'd better buy a box truck. 
Add a comment...

Joshua Roy

Shared publicly  - 
 
My parents left the Lutheran Church after they began ordaining women ministers. I'm sure this is very impressive to them. Churches as private societies can do whatever they want, but if that doesn't translate into more members and donations for them, then they probably won't last very long.

If the US government simply charged churches property taxes, probably a solid 30% of them would shutter over-night. Many churches are barely clinging onto life right now. My step-mother's church almost had to close over sewer drainage work that had to be done, and they are the last church standing in a small town of about 150 residents. 
 
(L) I think love might be contagious …


Story: http://bit.ly/1Cdi9kr
At the heels of last week's U.S. Supreme Court ruling allowing legal equal marriage in all 50 states, another lovely decision for LGBT rights emerges.
21 comments on original post
2
dëUs  ëX MãçH¡ñã's profile photoJoshua Roy's profile photoBill DeWitt's profile photo
3 comments
 
Episcopalians have been almost Unitarian for decades. They had openly gay pastors when I still lived in Florida.
Add a comment...

Joshua Roy

Shared publicly  - 
 
I don't think "sin" is an imaginary disease. Almost every platform of Judeo-Christian morality can be arrived at through logic alone. The Greeks had a system of virtues and vices, truthfulness was a virtue under that system and dishonesty was a vice. You don't need religion to teach basic morality and human decency. You don't even really need an objectively logical system like the Greeks employed. Basic empathy can highlight a great deal of how a person should behave in this world. 
 
Sure, it's become a strange and cliched term. But is "sin" really an "imaginary disease"? Read on & find out: http://wp.me/p2wzRb-cv
I’d never heard anybody call “sin” an imaginary disease, so when I saw this graphic posted on the Internet, it instantly grabbed my attention. “Sin” has become a strange and cliched term in our cul...
View original post
2
Bill DeWitt's profile photoRick Heil's profile photo
2 comments
 
Interesting notion.
I believe words do and should have meaning.

To me... the related words regarding some human err reflect (important) different references in respect to civil, moral, religious and personal harm.

A CRIME is the act of violating a civil rule or law, causing harm to fellow citizens.

A SIN is the act of violating a religious rule or law. Since there is no common, shared human religion this is purely a voluntary and arbitrary set of rules, causing harm to a god or other fellow believers beliefs.

A WRONGDOING (is there a better, non-religious word) is breaking a moral human rule or law, causing harm to humanity (and perhaps nature itself when harming other animals/species).

There should be a word for doing something that is harmful, against, an err, to oneself but not necessarily against any civil, moral or religious code, causing harm to yourself. 

Words like mistake, accident, imperfections and so on are not acts of err but words describing a state or reality and therefore should have no civil, moral, religious or personal implication.

Interesting notions. The more we separate and are clear about these the better. A lot of religious 'sins' (much coming from envy, greed, sloth and other lesser motives) creep into civil and moral realms and they should not. We should be able to achieve consensus on moral and civil rules, we can never on religious ones since they are by definition open to one's personal and non-rational simple beliefs (Because I believe 'x' does not mean therefore you have to too.)
Add a comment...

Joshua Roy

Shared publicly  - 
 
Probably the first waged job I worked that required an interview was at Magnolia Drag Strip when I was 15 years old doing summer work. The interview lasted all of five minutes, although granted it was for a very simple job. Today, I'm seeing people have to fill out psychological surveys on-line and go through 3 rounds of interviews for an entry level job, and I'm seeing some companies turning over to entire day interview marathons where every member of the team can pose questions to you about almost any topic.

In this age of temp agencies and employment at will, why are employers so worried about the kind of workers they hire on? Are people unable to utter the phrase, "I'm sorry, but this isn't working out," anymore? Personally, if I ran a company and the hiring manager came to me and said they needed a psychological survey and a day-long marathon interview to get a read on an employee, I'd be looking for a new hiring manager. This really isn't rocket science. 99% of the time, your secretary should be able to get a good read on a candidate while they are waiting for their interview. 

Can we return to an age when "What's your biggest weakness," is an impolite question to even ask someone?
Hiring managers can glean a ton of information about you by asking just a few, well-chosen questions. Some tips on how to answer them.
2
1
Dan Lewis's profile photoAlan Bombria's profile photoJoshua Roy's profile photoTimothy Musson's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Alan Bombria Looking over this briefly. One thought I already have is they want all these ambitious, future focused people.

Personally, I hate working with ambitious people. They are so focused on where they could be, that they aren't focused on doing what is right in front of them. From my experience these are the personality types most likely to claim credit for work they did not personally do or try to cast blame on someone else in order to tear down someone they perceive as a threat. 

I'd rather work with an aloof intellectual without any financial or social status motivations whatsoever than some histrionic egotist, but then again I prefer highly cerebral jobs, so maybe that kind of personality type is useful somewhere else. 

Personally, you couldn't pay me enough to encounter people like that on a daily basis. I value my sanity vastly more than paper money. 
Add a comment...

Joshua Roy

Shared publicly  - 
 
Ohio's marijuana legislation slated to be on the ballot this November isn't perfect, specifically the monopoly provision isn't perfect, but it is better than nothing. The Republican's move to block this by passing a provision against monopolies is hilarious. Do they realize that they'll be cutting their nose off to spite their face? 95% of Republican political power relies on the ability of government to collude with for-profit interests. The liberals try to do it one time to get something they want passed and suddenly it's morally wrong?
State lawmakers are rushing to throw a constitutional obstacle in the path of supporters of a marijuana-legalization campaign. The plan rolled out Tuesday was backed by top legislative leaders, but critics said that it may go too far in trying to derail the fast-moving marijuana plan engineered by ResponsibleOhio.
1
Dan Lewis's profile photoBill DeWitt's profile photo
4 comments
 
lol, you said "joint"...
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
8,018 people
Shariful Islam's profile photo
Matthew Brower's profile photo
ary dierschnabel filho's profile photo
Michael Cole's profile photo
Roger Leung's profile photo
W. Amadeo Kronig's profile photo
(benzion888) The Bible Prophecy Channel's profile photo
mong savath's profile photo
Jennifer Collins's profile photo

Joshua Roy

Shared publicly  - 
 
lol. Somehow I think this is the straw that broke the camel's back. Take note of where you are right now so in 20 years you can tell your children about the day middle America lost its mind. 
Statement is signed by tracks that play host to Sprint Cup, Xfinity, Camping World Truck Series events.
1
Joshua Roy's profile photoJeffrey Hamby's profile photoBill DeWitt's profile photo
6 comments
 
Yeah, but I always hope that gang sports and herd entertainment will be a passing phase and folks will come to their senses.
Add a comment...

Joshua Roy

Shared publicly  - 
 
I just know at this point if you have to surround yourself with people like Jim Bob and Michele Duggar and GOP presidential hopefuls, your life is punishment enough. I wouldn't wish that reality on my worst enemy. 

According to Christianity, Jesus came for the sinners, so even if homosexuality is a sin, then a person could be homosexual their entire lives, repent and go to heaven. Focusing on any one sin a bit dishonest. Where's the sermon on gamblers and alcoholics going to hell? I guess that would put a crimp on Wednesday night bingo. 
Don't get all misty for Pastor Rick Scarborough, who wrote an op-ed explaining that his 'love for homosexuals' is so he can 'offer God's redemption.'
4
David Carey's profile photoBill DeWitt's profile photo
9 comments
 
I don't really follow Paul very much, but for sure I only comment on other people's spiritual health when they ask me to keep watch over them, not when I just feel like I should. I had a short run-in with "Discipleship" churches and that made me wary.
Add a comment...

Joshua Roy

Shared publicly  - 
 
This system is simply unsustainable. Beyond a certain point it will inevitably lead to social unrest. I hope they enjoy living on their vast estates in isolation, because it is going to become rapidly uncomfortable for them to try to go anywhere to enjoy their purchasing power. What is the utility of vast hoards of money when you can no longer enjoy the beauty of your own home country?
2
1
Jeffrey Hamby's profile photoJoshua Roy's profile photoTimothy Musson's profile photo
19 comments
 
+Jeffrey Hamby Were it not for eminent domain, no one would be able to make a stretch of roadway longer than ten miles long. People are too stubborn as a species. You'd constantly be running into crotchety old guys that want $10,000,000 to cross ten acres of land and don't want you to drive traffic through there after 10 pm, because it would keep them up at night. 
Add a comment...

Joshua Roy

Shared publicly  - 
 
Happy Thursday everyone. Tomorrow is the 4th of July federal holiday day for many of us in the United States, so today is technically my Friday. I hope everyone has a great weekend. If you live in the States and aren't firework-averse, enjoy the explosions this weekend. I doubt I'll be watching any of the firework displays. Tomorrow, I've got a bunch of stuff to do to catch up on side-work, and then this weekend, I'm going to Pennsylvania to move a bunch of stuff from my house into long-term storage. 

Fun, Fun. I keep telling myself this summer I'm going to have a weekend where I just sit around in air conditioning and play video games, but that has yet to happen one time. Most weekends, I look forward to returning to work so I can rest some. ;p
3
Timothy Musson's profile photo
 
Maybe time is slowing down because you're so busy! Novelty effect and all...

Have a great extended weekend!
Add a comment...

Joshua Roy

Shared publicly  - 
 
When analyzing "white privilege," I can see how white people do live better than many other minorities. Our encounters with police go better. Our job interviews and higher education applications go better. We tend to be paid more money. We have a tendency to have access to more effective schools and tend to grow up in safer neighborhoods and those neighborhoods tend to have things like bus-stops, parks, and grocery stores that allow us to live a relatively comfortable life, but the problem I have is that I don't think this should really be seen as a privilege, but as the way it should be for all American citizens. Saying it is a privilege is implying that no one should get to live this good.

Instead of trying to make whites feel guilty for having "special privileges," maybe instead we can inform them about "minority disadvantages and inequalities," and help them to shape social and political practices and opinions that will give the least advantaged minority members a leg up in this competitive world. Maybe we can teach them about inter-racial empathy so that way someday when they are a hiring manager they won't treat people outside of their racial group differently than they do people of their own racial background.

The most offensive thing to me when it comes to the conditions many minority people must endure today is the way the police behave towards them. If the police behaved that way in white suburbia, there would be a nationwide outcry to create citizen review boards, but because it is happening in our poorest neighborhoods, Americans are too quick to turn a blind eye.

Right now, churches are burning all across the South, targeting the African American community and we have absolute media silence. This is inappropriate. These are just as much my fellow citizens as any other American is, and they are deserving of the same protections that any other people have. Where is the outrage on the 700 club declaring that Christianity is under attack? Are these people any less a part of your God's Kingdom simply because of the color of their skin?

Personally, I think America is a racist country, in many ways on both sides of this issue, and I think that we like to sugar coat things and sweep them under the rug and pretend they don't exist, but for me it is just as racist to have an absence of outrage during an obviously terrible situation as it is to have the presence of disgust over a normal situation. 
 
Exactly why my kid is NOT going to any public school EVER, these psycho progressives are really going too far, this is another reason why I can't watch current events anymore, its really getting ridiculous now, its this luciferian doctrine that leeks getting more wicked literally day by day, smh...

Millions going to train teachers on 'white privilege' http://www.onenewsnow.com/education/2015/06/30/millions-going-to-train-teachers-on-white-privilege
A Minnesota school district is attempting to solve its problem of violence among minority students by hiring a consulting firm that teaches "white racism" is the reason for those problems.
3 comments on original post
4
Joshua Roy's profile photoTimothy Musson's profile photoBill DeWitt's profile photo
8 comments
 
+Timothy Musson i've heard those claims but never heard them backed up with documentation and without caveats (like polite and rich). I used to get pulled over all the time when I lived in the "Little Vietnam" section of my town. Not because I was black or white or Asian, but because I was driving in the wrong part of town at the wrong time of night. But black people in that area complained about being targeted even if they got pulled over less than me.
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
8,018 people
Shariful Islam's profile photo
Matthew Brower's profile photo
ary dierschnabel filho's profile photo
Michael Cole's profile photo
Roger Leung's profile photo
W. Amadeo Kronig's profile photo
(benzion888) The Bible Prophecy Channel's profile photo
mong savath's profile photo
Jennifer Collins's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Ecologist
Employment
  • ASC Group, Inc.
    Ecologist, 2015 - present
    Climbing mountains searching for wetland species, helping companies fill out government permit applications.
  • Out of the Box Radio Show, Cognitive Journeys
    Admin, co-host, staff member, 2014 - present
  • University of Pittsburgh: Center for Vaccine Research
    Research Specialist III, 2010 - 2012
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Columbus, Ohio
Previously
Greensburg, Pa - Hobart, Oklahoma - Pittsburgh, PA - Fort Worth, Texas - Wichita Falls, Texas - San Diego, California - Los Angeles, California - Minerva, Ohio - Alliance, Ohio - Dennison, Ohio - Bowerston, Ohio - Carrolton, Ohio - Covolo, California - Riverside, California - Richland, Washington -
Story
Tagline
Back from a long hiatus
Introduction
I'm a student of life trying to grow where I'm planted while I search for a more permanent home.
Bragging rights
Got degree, can travel, know how to hold down my end of a conversation, don't fidget with my cell phone when entertaining company
Education
  • University of Pittsburgh: Graduate School of Public Health
    Human Genetics, 2010 - 2013
  • Point Park University
    Biotechnology, 2006 - 2010
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
In a relationship