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Joseph Moosman
Works at Independent Developer / Analyst
Attended Cornell University
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Trained as an anthropologist. During the Enlightenment.
Introduction
Independent software developer and Bottle washer. Trained as a social anthropologist. During the Enlightenment. Became a developer and analyst in an effort to pay bills. 
Bragging rights
3 sons 2 grandsons. Recently modeled the compensation system used by the folks who manage all of the primary health care for 1.6 million Swedes. Referenced in doctoral dissertations that I don't understand because I don't have the requisite background in epidemiology.
Education
  • Cornell University
  • University of California, Santa Cruz
  • University of California, San Diego
  • University of Arizona
Work
Occupation
Trying to stay out of trouble. Very busy.
Skills
I listen.
Employment
  • Independent Developer / Analyst
    Chief Bottle Washer, present
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Gender
Male
Other names
Too Numerous To Mention

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Joseph Moosman

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Don't miss the video.
 
A new species of peacock spider discovered in Australia!

Officially named Maratus personatus (the species name derives from the Latin for masked), blueface belongs to the growing family of peacock spiders – dazzling little Australian natives that are just 3 to 5 millimetres long. As the name suggests, the males use vivid colours to attract females. But unlike other peacock spiders, the male M. personatus does not have a fan-like abdomen that it extends while trying to court females. Instead, it relies on its blue mask and the characteristic white banding around it to lure lady spiders.

The man behind the above picture is Jürgen Otto, a mite biologist at the Australian Department of Agriculture in Sydney, who has been on a mission to document peacock spiders in Australia since 2008. He heard about blueface – a possible new species – from the Perth-based spider-specialist David Knowles.

The two set off on a mission to document it in 2013, but Knowles had an accident that prevented him from continuing the trip. Out on his own, Otto searched for hours and was about to give up until his persistence paid off, he says.

Not only did he document M. personatus in the wild, he also reared several individuals into adulthood after one of the females he collected laid eggs. When one of the egg-carrying sacks ruptured, he was able to observe all the developmental stages of the tiny spider.

http://peckhamia.com/peckhamia/PECKHAMIA_127.1.pdf
Nicknamed 'blueface', these tiny creatures have just been discovered in bushland in Western Australia
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Joseph Moosman

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An astonishing piece of evidence for the power and influence of the early Islamic states.
 
King Offa of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia died #onthisday‬ in AD 796. This coin is one of the most remarkable English coins of the Middle Ages as it imitates a gold dinar of the caliph al-Mansur, ruler of the Islamic Abbasid dynasty http://ow.ly/QajlY
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Andres Soolo's profile photo
 
Actually, this does not translate directly into political power.

The Vikings of the time also had trade.  But they were less literate, they used more ingots than coins, and ingots tend to be made into other things rather than kept around as coins.

The Englishmen of the time also had trade.  (Less international trade, to be sure, but they minted coins and collected taxes, as was customary.)  However, for several centuries, the English way of implementing inflation was that people's old coins would be declared obsolete, and they were required to take them to royal mints to be re-struck for a small fee.  As a result, the majority of early English coins were lost to history — there were many more circulating, and re-struck periodically, than stashed away for future historians.

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Bravo!
 
Today marks the start of Stockholm Pride! With over 50,000 participants and 500,000 spectators it's the largest Pride celebration in Scandinavia. The parade itself takes place on Saturday.
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It bothers me a bit that we're lagging behind the Finns but second place isn't too bad.
 
#Sweden has 52.2% female government ministers – the 2nd highest share in the OECD. http://swein.st/1JdRt4t
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Joseph Moosman

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So easy to do wrong. If I'm in a hurry or not paying attention it falls apart every time. I've seen a glazier caulk flawlessly from a little ball of putty in a single stroke using his thumb. I did this seam in one stroke with a putty knife. The other day I couldn't get it right. Today I did it without thinking. 
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Joseph Moosman's profile photoBob Calder's profile photo
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I'm setting up the garage as a paint booth to lacquer my kitchen cabinets this week. I'm selling the house. :-/

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Fascinating. Both the product itself and the difficult cognitive issue of convincing people that an object can be both asymmetrical and predictable.
 
Skew dice: the dice are skewed but the odds aren't. Joint work with +Robert Fathauer. 
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Deen Abiola's profile photoJoseph Moosman's profile photoSteve S's profile photo
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+Deen Abiola good point. Crooked dice are more predictable. 

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We're an influential bunch.
 
0.13% of the world's population live in Sweden.
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Sakari Maaranen's profile photoGeoffrey Swenson's profile photoTrey Pitsenberger's profile photo
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I visit Ikea on a regular basis. Is that the same?

Joseph Moosman

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+Gabriel Moosman​ photographs https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drosera_rotundifolia which we call sileshår and which are sometimes called "sundews" in English. These plants are insectivores. They typically grow in very poor, wet soils. +Trey Pitsenberger​
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These plants are so cool. When I visited UC Davis a year or so ago we took photos of pitcher plants, relatives of sundew, in bloom. https://plus.google.com/+TreyPitsenberger/posts/HSvV2ztKNrP

Joseph Moosman

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I don't often reshare gee-whiz technology articles but this is quite astonishing.
 
"Scientists used the Mira supercomputer to identify and improve a new mechanism for eliminating friction, which fed into the development of a hybrid material that exhibited superlubricity at the macroscale for the first time. Researchers helped enable the groundbreaking simulations by overcoming a performance bottleneck that doubled the speed of the team's code".
Scientists used the Mira supercomputer to identify and improve a new mechanism for eliminating friction, which fed into the development of a hybrid material that exhibited superlubricity at the macroscale for the first time. Researchers helped enable the groundbreaking simulations by overcoming a performance bottleneck that doubled the speed of the team's code.
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Not a happy story. Nice photo of a snake, however. I've always admired rattlesnakes. Wouldn't occur to me to mess around with one, however. They're venomous, but not as venomous as the "health care" sector in the United States. 
Snake bites may be scary, but what comes after can be terrifying.
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Joseph Moosman

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This mighty Lion of Saint Mark followed us home from Venice last Fall. Now he has finally found his spot and is faithfully guarding the front entrance. Day and night. Goodnight everyone from Old Skaraborg! 
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I think the word "sacred" is OK in this context. As to not translating fika, I never heard about any misgivings. "Coffee break" is just incorrect, not blasphemous!
 
"Swedes prefer not to translate the sacred word 'fika'. They don’t want it to lose significance and become a mere coffee break." Indeed! Happy #Fika
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Lucia Abonandi's profile photoDan Weese's profile photoTrey Pitsenberger's profile photo
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I like the concept of fika. Heck, here where the summer afternoons get so hot I am lobbying for a full blown siesta during the mid day. Can't get anyone else to join in though. 
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