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"What used to be good advice is not necessarily good advice anymore. (That also means, that if you happen to read this blog post in 2019 or something, don’t trust it!)"

A good tip for those of us with technical blogs. Make sure your good information ends up in places that can be community-edited, updated, and improved!
The audio stack in Linux/Ubuntu evolves over time. What used to be good advice is not necessarily good advice anymore. (That also means, that if you happen to read this blog post in 2019 or something,...
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Jorge Castro's profile photoMathieu Lonjaret's profile photoSalih Emin's profile photoMarco Ceppi's profile photo
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Point 2 deserves repeat. Don't purge pulseaudio.
 
+Bilal Akhtar I disagree. I had removed pulseaudio from my system for a while, and it was working very well, using jack, and some loopback magic. I really wish GNOME/etc… would care more about professional audio needs though. It truly is a pain using both pulseaudio and jack on the same system.
 
+Rodney Dawes I think the point here is that the first responders to forum threads complaining about broken audio in some cases (Skype, SDL, at al) still suggest it based on old information.

Some people benefit from an altered audio stack, but the vast majority benefit most staying with PA.
 
this is a perfect example of how messed up linux distros are becoming. things used to be simple(r)...
 
+Mathieu Lonjaret It is much simpler, people just need to learn that there's usually a simpler way to fix something other than ripping out their entire sound stack.
 
+Jorge Castro Granted, for a lot of things linux distros (ubuntu in particular) are now much more accessible to a larger audience. However, what I deplore is that it seems the price for this apparent ease of use is a much larger complexity overall, with many more layers/subsystems.

Hence, when users a bit more knowledgeable (like me) hit something broken, it is not as easy as it used to be to find a fix by myself (because I can't possibly know about every part of the system nowadays). Maybe that complexity is an unavoidable price to pay, but I still find that situation a bit sad.
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