Profile

Cover photo
Jordan Schnaidt
Works at Maverick Software Consulting
Attends University of Minnesota Duluth
Lives in Duluth, MN
253 followers|305,602 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube+1'sReviews

Stream

Jordan Schnaidt

Shared publicly  - 
 
Can't agree more. Discrimination and free market, unfortunately, go hand in hand. I'd rather have some regulation than continue to advocate for a Laissez-faire approach.
 
It should be fairly obvious that discrimination imposes costs on the people being discriminated against. But if you think about it for a moment, it should also be fairly obvious that discrimination -- be it explicit or implicit -- also imposes costs on the economy as a whole.

The reason is fairly simple: if a market were truly "free" (with all the subtleties that that phrase entails), people would be doing what they're best at, in the way that rewards them the most. Discrimination is, by its nature, something that keeps people from doing what they want to. And general principles of economics tell us that, when resources are allocated inefficiently, the economy as a whole slows down.

More concretely, if there's someone who would have been a great doctor, but is instead forced by circumstance -- be it being the wrong race or growing up poor -- to be a janitor instead, then not only does she lose out on everything she would have gained as a doctor, but everyone else loses out on everything she would have done as a doctor.

This brings us to this rather interesting paper from four researchers at the National Bureau of Economic Research, who wanted to put some numbers to this. (http://klenow.com/HHJK.pdf) For example, in 1960, 94% of doctors and lawyers were white men; in 2008, 62% were. Since there's no reason to believe that white men are intrinsically better at being doctors than anyone else, that gives us a way to estimate how many people would have been doctors who weren't. By building a mathematical model out of this, they estimate the real economic impact of discrimination -- and it turns out that somewhere between 15-20% of our total economic growth during that period comes from that.

For a sense of scale, during this time the inflation-adjusted GDP grew from $3.95T (in 2008 dollars) to $14.7T. That means that at the lower end of the estimate, the discrimination that went away between 1960 and 2008 was costing the US about $33 billion (in 2008 dollars, again) per year.

Note that this is just the aggregate cost to society as a whole, summed up between rich and poor. Obviously some people gained from this as well -- e.g., the people who became doctors who wouldn't have been able to, had the full pool of people who could have been doctors been allowed to participate. (And there's your next unsettling thought for the day: if you take the people who want to be doctors and line them up in order of how good a doctor they would be, and cut it off after you have enough doctors, you've got the best possible pool of doctors. If you take any one of them out of eligibility for some reason, then his replacement is mathematically guaranteed to be a worse doctor. You have just promoted some undeserving schmuck to perform surgery on you. Congratulations.) 

But leaving aside the question of how different people fared under this, consider as well: this difference accounts for all of the discrimination that went away between 1960 and 2008.

We have not, by any stretch of the imagination, gotten rid of all the discrimination. The girl growing up in the Appalachian back country, the boy growing up in Baltimore, the child of migrant farm workers, these people are not likely to be able to go to college, get a BA or MD, work in the job of their choice. 

When we talk about the economic costs of inequality, this is the sort of thing that really matters: not just the costs to those at the bottom, but the fact that inequality of opportunity has huge costs for society as a whole. Since in our society in particular, opportunity is greatly tied to existing resources -- consider anything from access to out-of-school enrichment, to having a good suit to wear to an interview, to knowing how to interview for a job in the first place (you learned that; it wasn't innate. You learned it from other people, and access to those people is a resource) -- resource inequality leads in turn to opportunity inequality, and that drags everyone down, even as it enriches the incompetent few.

Macroeconomics says: Trade makes everyone wealthier. You can't impoverish some people without that screwing everyone else over, as well. Trying to flout those laws tends to work about as well as trying to flout gravity: it might work really well, briefly. There's just that sudden stop at the end.


(Illustration via Paul Townsend: https://flic.kr/p/dVva6h. What goes up tends to come down somewhat rapidly, at times.)
82 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Jordan Schnaidt

Shared publicly  - 
 
Welcome, Microsoft, to the rest of the world.
As Microsoft has shifted towards a more customer-oriented culture. Microsoft engineers are using social networks, tech communities and direct customer feedback as an integral part on how we make decisions about future investments. A popular request the PowerShell team has received is to use ...
2
1
Terry Poulin's profile photo
 
Now I have an excuse to switch from cmd.exe to PowerShell, and less groaning about how well the former works over SSH.
Add a comment...

Jordan Schnaidt

Shared publicly  - 
 
For as much as we give the oil companies every year, I'm totally okay with this. You know the minute Elon's products become a minority, and not just a niche product, the oil megacorps are going to rush out to invest in them.
Los Angeles entrepreneur Elon Musk has built a multibillion-dollar fortune running companies that make electric cars, sell solar panels and launch rockets into space.
3
Add a comment...

Jordan Schnaidt

Shared publicly  - 
 
All Hail Dans_hairy_mouse_64 of House Beigewalls, first of her name on the Internet, the Unfried, the Queen of Motherboards, and HP Towers and Dell Desktops, Kelly C++ of the Great Github Repo, Remover of Optical Drives and Mother of a little plushie dragon.
1
Add a comment...

Jordan Schnaidt

Shared publicly  - 
 
If only this was on purpose.
1
1
Jake Weisz's profile photo
Add a comment...
In his circles
133 people
Have him in circles
253 people
Jibril Jaha's profile photo
Craig Trapp's profile photo
Alex R.'s profile photo
selena john's profile photo
Ed Knudsen's profile photo
Jesus Fest's profile photo
Yan naing's profile photo
Brent Jungclaus's profile photo
Brian Crow's profile photo

Jordan Schnaidt

Shared publicly  - 
 
#todo Back this project.
 
Leonard Nimoy's son Adam has launched a Kickstarter to do a documentary about his father. Check it out: http://bit.ly/LoveOfSpock
Adam Nimoy is raising funds for "For the Love of Spock" - A Documentary Film on Kickstarter! YOU can help make Adam & Leonard Nimoy's plan to create a Spock Doc come true! Watch the video, share the vision & pledge what you can!
16 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Jordan Schnaidt

Shared publicly  - 
1
Add a comment...

Jordan Schnaidt

Shared publicly  - 
 
The maiden voyage can now continue boldly into the unknown!
If you were on pins and needles wondering whether or not the LightSail solar ship would resume contact with the crew back on Earth, you can relax. The P
1
Add a comment...

Jordan Schnaidt

Shared publicly  - 
 
Sure, let's ignore all the fake news articles driven by pageviews and attack the one about how journalists got hoodwinked into promoting a fake diet. I guess it's easy to point the finger at someone else when you're discussing ethics.
Op-ed: Journalist thinks it's fine to fool millions in order to make a point.
1
Add a comment...

Jordan Schnaidt

Shared publicly  - 
 
Oh hai
Websites are already able to serve up ads customized for whoever happens to be viewing a page. Now an ad agency in Russia is taking that idea one step further with an outdoor billboard that’s able to automatically hide when it spots the police coming.
1
Add a comment...

Jordan Schnaidt

Shared publicly  - 
 
Let's not, mmkay?
AT&T fights proposed ban on data cap exemptions in DirecTV merger.
2
Add a comment...
People
In his circles
133 people
Have him in circles
253 people
Jibril Jaha's profile photo
Craig Trapp's profile photo
Alex R.'s profile photo
selena john's profile photo
Ed Knudsen's profile photo
Jesus Fest's profile photo
Yan naing's profile photo
Brent Jungclaus's profile photo
Brian Crow's profile photo
Work
Employment
  • Maverick Software Consulting
    Intern, 2014 - present
  • Fast Enterprise
    Implementation Intern, 2013 - 2013
  • University of Minnesota Duluth
    Student Life Tech Assistant, 2011 - 2013
  • Wal-Mart
    Sporting Goods Associate, 2008 - 2011
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Duluth, MN
Previously
Arlington, VA - Coon Rapids, MN
Links
Other profiles
Story
Introduction
I'd like to fashion myself as a purveyor of fine things. I enjoy using the latest and greatest in technology. My standards for music are high, and include a decent interest among Christian Contemporary artists, Rock & Roll, and classical/instrumental music. I love to watch movies with a well-developed story and relate-able characters, even if the filming itself isn't the greatest. My reading tastes cover mostly fantasy and science-fiction, and within that spectrum stories that make me regret putting down or finishing the book, because I might be separated from well-written characters. I love to write, and hold myself to the same standards that I do my authors and movie writers. When I write in the physical realm, I enjoy writing with a fountain pen versus pencil or ballpoint.

Interests aside, I am currently a student pursuing my undergraduate degree in Computer Science, with a minor in Deaf Studies. I attend the University of Minnesota Duluth, in the beautiful port city of Duluth, MN —which certainly comes as a surprise. After school and work, I don't have much free time, but what I do have I devote much of to student government, games and stories, and writing.

My passion for technology, student government, my personal interests and maybe a funny image or two are the things you may see me post and comment on. Enjoy it or not, the choice is yours!
Education
  • University of Minnesota Duluth
    Computer Science, 2011 - present
  • Madison Elementary School
    1994 - 1995
  • Sand Creek Elementary School
    1995 - 2000
  • Coon Rapids Middle School
    2000 - 2003
  • Coon Rapids Senior High School
    2003 - 2007
  • University of Minnesota Duluth
    Computer Science, 2007 - 2008
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
January 29, 1989
Jordan Schnaidt's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Google+ Help (Unofficial) .
plus.google.com

Unofficial Google+ knowledge hub for newcomers

Ubuntu
plus.google.com

Linux for Human Beings

The White House
plus.google.com

Get news, go behind-the-scenes and engage with the Obama administration

Hangout Captions
plus.google.com

Hangout Captions is an app from Google Accessibility. It brings live transcription services directly into a Google+ Hangout, improving accessibility for participants that are deaf or hard of hearing.

University of Minnesota Duluth
plus.google.com

University of Minnesota Duluth hasn't shared anything on this page with you.

Sammy's Pizza & Restaurant
plus.google.com

Sammy's Pizza & Restaurant hasn't shared anything on this page with you.

Did You Know ?
plus.google.com

Interesting and cool informations from everyWhere

Syncdocs
plus.google.com

Keep all your data with you, wherever you are

Excellent little restaurant just a half walk from Dupont Circle in DC. The staff was friendly and prompt with service. I had the Catfish, which was delicious. The decor and location belies a surprisingly pleasant experience.
Food: ExcellentDecor: GoodService: Excellent
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
This is like a classier Subway, with more options, fresh ingredients and salads being first class citizens alongside sandwiches. I had some trouble understanding the accents of the employees, and the restaurant is noisy enough for it to matter, but their service is excellent. Great quality for a good $ price.
Food: ExcellentDecor: Very GoodService: Very Good
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
2 reviews
Map
Map
Map