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Jordan Peacock
Lives in Lakeville, MN
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Jordan Peacock

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If you're in the Twin Cities, you'll want to support this. This is the same company that put on Doubt and One Arm, and earned 'best debut' for a theatrical company from l'etoile last year.

Even if you're not in the Twin Cities, if you want to support good theatre here is an excellent way to do it.

C'mon, it's Coriolanus.
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Jordan Peacock

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My friend Jim's Masters thesis:

In this paper I highlight Adler's words on gemeinschaftsgefühl, which I translate as feeling-at-home, and expand upon his words using insights and knowledge from the fields of neuroscience and psychophysiology, contemporary somatic psychotherapy, and contemplative practice. I further argue that new Adler-influenced psychotherapists, before they can help clients feel at home, must begin to feel at home themselves. I close the paper with practices to help new psychotherapists begin to embody a sense of feeling-at-home.

http://alfredadler.edu/library/masters/2015/james-wagner
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Jordan Peacock

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Matt Yglesias:

No modern political party's establishment has ever tried as hard to package up a nomination and tie it off with a bow as the Democrats did for Clinton over the course of 2016. And it didn't work out very well. The result ought to serve as a wake-up call to a Democratic Party elite that's gotten a little smug and out of touch over the past few years.

he Clinton campaign's strategy will, of course, be second-guessed, as stumbling frontrunners always are. But the larger problem is the way that party as a whole — elected officials, operatives, leaders of allied interest groups, major donors, graybeard elder statespersons, etc. — decided to cajole all viable non-Clinton candidates out of the race. This had the effect of making a Clinton victory much more likely than it would have been in a scenario when she was facing off against Elizabeth Warren, Joe Biden, and Deval Patrick. But it also means that the only alternative to Clinton is a candidate the party leaders don't regard as viable.

[...]

This is a party that has no viable plan for winning the House of Representatives, that's been pushed to a historic low point in terms of state legislative seats, and that somehow lost the governor's mansions in New Jersey, Maryland, Massachusetts, and Illinois.

It's a party, in other words, that was clearly in need of some dialogue, debate, and contestation over what went wrong and how to fix it. But instead of encouraging such a dialogue, the party tried to cut it off. That leaves them with Sanders's political revolution theory. It doesn't seem very plausible to me, but at least it's something.

http://www.vox.com/2016/2/2/10892724/bernie-sanders-wake-up-call
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Sanders does well with young, poor, liberal, and white Democrats.  Clinton does well with old, moderate, wealthy, and Hispanic & black Democrats.

Jordan Peacock

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Which of these have to be escaped, and do you just add more backslashes?

Jordan Peacock

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// The Internet is a kid with a magnifying glass and you are the ant.

I’ve started thinking of this as an attention lens: small, human amounts of individual attention are refracted through social media to converge on a single person, producing the effect of infinite attention at the focal point. Even in the event that everyone means well, the experience is surreal for the person at the focal point of the lens.

[...]

Like an amplification DDoS attack, each individual participant need only contribute a handful of messages to flood the target’s mentions. Combine that with a small set of leaders indirectly coordinating the daily hate and you have the blueprints for a fuckboy mention-laser capable of melting steel beams with collimated rays of anime avatars.

[...]

We’re all deeply in love with the possibilities of fan-out, but what’ll get us in the end is the fan-in.

https://codahale.com/fan-in/
Fan-In. 01 Feb 2016. For a long time, my go-to question when interviewing a candidate was about building Twitter. I was looking to see how they thought about scalability and so, in classic programming interview cargo cult style, I would try to lead the candidate down the road of designing a ...
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/sub

Jordan Peacock

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From an interview with Marc Edwards:

Q. Do you have any sense that perverse incentive structures prevented scientists from exposing the problem in Flint sooner?

A. Yes, I do. In Flint the agencies paid to protect these people weren’t solving the problem. They were the problem. What faculty person out there is going to take on their state, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?

I don’t blame anyone, because I know the culture of academia. You are your funding network as a professor. You can destroy that network that took you 25 years to build with one word. I’ve done it. When was the last time you heard anyone in academia publicly criticize a funding agency, no matter how outrageous their behavior? We just don’t do these things.

If an environmental injustice is occurring, someone in a government agency is not doing their job. Everyone we wanted to partner said, Well, this sounds really cool, but we want to work with the government. We want to work with the city. And I’m like, You’re living in a fantasy land, because these people are the problem.

Q. I keep coming back to these university researchers in Flint who said: "The state has 50 epidemiologists. They say that the water’s safe. So I’m going to focus my energy on something that’s less settled." How do you decide when the state should be challenged?

A. That’s a great question. We are not skeptical enough about each other’s results. What’s the upside in that? You’re going to make enemies. People might start questioning your results. And that’s going to start slowing down our publication assembly line. Everyone’s invested in just cranking out more crap papers.

So when you start asking questions about people, and you approach them as a scientist, if you feel like you’re talking to an adult and they give you a rational response and are willing to share data and discuss an issue rationally, I’m out of there. I go home.

But when you reach out to them, as I did with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and they do not return your phone calls, they do not share data, they do not respond to FOIA [open-records requests], y’know. … In each case I just started asking questions and turning over rocks, and I resolved to myself, The second something slimy doesn’t come out, I’m gonna go home. But every single rock you turn over, something slimy comes out.

[...]

Q. I talked to this woman yesterday at the university pavilion. She’s a senior, a nursing student. We looked at the stickers the university had put on its water fountain, saying that this has a filter, that this is safe. And she said: "No. I don’t drink the water here. I don’t care what they say. I don’t care if it’s from the university." At that level of mistrust, the system doesn’t work. What do you think people would have to see in order to start trusting what scientists tell them?

A. It’s going to take time for the people in Flint. They have been so betrayed, and the callous way that our most vulnerable were treated in Flint by the very agencies paid to protect them is so profoundly disturbing. That’s why this is striking such a chord.

http://chronicle.com/article/The-Water-Next-Time-Professor/235136/

Marc Edwards, a professor of civil engineering at Virginia Tech, has become something of a folk hero for his role in identifying lead in the city’s water. But he says he takes no pleasure in the attention. Instead he worries that university res
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+Edward Morbius that is correct
Have him in circles
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Jordan Peacock

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Kevin Drum:

Hey, "people" told him his ground game was fine! And it was. By most standards. Anyway, Iowa doesn't really matter. And Ted Cruz cheated. And the grass was wet. And the sun was in his eyes.

This is Trump all over. He hops from one failure to another, always with a handy excuse. Football is a lousy business. Eastern Airlines ripped me off. The Plaza would have done great if the economy hadn't turned down. Atlantic City was overbuilt. I never really had anything to do with Trump University.

This is the same guy who thinks that running America will be child's play. It's so easy. Just watch. But he's such a lousy manager that he never bothered to learn what a "ground game" is—which is roughly the equivalent of understanding about food costs if you run a restaurant.

I wouldn't hire Donald Trump to run a lemonade stand, let alone the United States of America.

http://m.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2016/02/excuses-are-flying-high-trumpworld
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Though Cruz actually cheated and what he did was probably illegal.

Jordan Peacock

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Sarah Perry:

In the PROGRESA study in Mexico, cash transfers were “conditional” not in the sense of conditional on staying poor, but in the sense that, for instance, children were required to attend school. This closely approximates the third criterion for universal basic income: while poor people were chosen to receive the benefit, there’s no disincentive to earning more money once they are in the program. This is also the case in the study of Belgian lottery winners: their prize of monthly income was not reduced by their earnings. The PROGRESA study found no significant effect of cash transfers on adult workforce participation, and in the small Belgian study hardly anyone quit their job, and very few reduced the amount that they worked.

[...]

As an important contrast, the study on disability benefits found that receiving disability benefits seemed to cause a significant reduction in employment and earnings. [...] Social security disability has one of the most onerous “take-back” (marginal tax) rates; even very small amounts of earnings reduce benefits, and earning an amount well below what is required to live will disqualify one altogether.

[...]

Giving people money within the existing web of conditional benefits could potentially hurt them: potential recipients currently receiving need-based benefits (including medical, educational, and disability-related benefits) may lose them, and the loss in some cases could be greater than the gain.

[...]

Roberts closes by suggesting that free time is a driver of innovation itself – precisely because of our human tendency toward procrastination (pursuing our particular specialized hobbies). Even if universal basic income does result in less workforce participation, and even though most recipients are unlikely to become entrepreneurs, we may see society-wide benefits from a few more geniuses having more free time (even if most people play video games – as if that’s the worst possible fate for humanity!).

http://www.ribbonfarm.com/2016/02/04/free-money/
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PS: Interesting idea about 'new ways of peopling' spreading.

Jordan Peacock

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Peter Watts:

You will find no public health advisories about Lyme Disease in Costa Rica. On the face of it, this is perfectly reasonable; Lyme Disease has never been reported there, and none of the local tick species is known to carry the bacterium that causes it.

Some of those ticks, however, are closely related to those in other regions which do carry that bacterium, and many pathogens are able to infect a far greater range of species than they actually occupy; simple isolation is the only thing that keeps them from reaching their true infectious potential. Thus, while Costa Rica is free of Lyme Disease at present, potential vectors already occur in abundance there. The infrastructure for an outbreak is already in place: a single asymptomatic tourist may be all it takes to loose this painful, debilitating disease on the local population.

Lyme disease is by no means unique. Climate change alters movement and home range for a myriad organisms. Our transport of people and goods carries countless pathogens around the globe. Isolated species come into sudden contact; parasites and diseases find themselves surrounded by naïve and vulnerable new hosts. And so maladies literally unknown only four or five decades ago — AIDS in humans, Ebola in humans and gorillas, West Nile virus and Avian Influenza in humans and birds, chytrid fungi in amphibians, distemper in sea lions — have today become almost commonplace. Pathogens encounter new hosts with no resistance and no time to evolve any. In such a world EIDs are inevitable. They are ongoing. A month scarcely passes without news of some freshly-discovered strain of influenza trading up to a human host.

This month, it’s Zika.

http://www.rifters.com/crawl/?p=6461
There's this guy I knew, Dan Brooks. Retired now, an eminent parasitologist and evolutionary biologist back in the day. He did a lot of work on emerging infectious diseases (EIDs, for you acronym fetishists) down in Latin America. A few years back I wrote some introductory text for an online ...
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Jordan Peacock

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R.I.P. Jon Bunch
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This film by S.G. Collins, the response to Rohan, his Nuke Skeptic, response, and Privacy is Dead are excellent.
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Introduction
I like the stars. It's the illusion of permanence, I think. I mean, they're always flaring up and caving in and going out. But from here, I can pretend... I can pretend that things last. I can pretend that lives last longer than moments. Gods come, and gods go. Mortals flicker and flash and fade. Worlds don't last; and stars and galaxies are transient, fleeting things that twinkle like fireflies and vanish into cold and dust. But I can pretend.

                               Neil Gaiman "The Sandman"

I'm a metaphysical realist, posthumanist, autodidact, infovore.

I'm intellectually promiscuous, and love provocative engagements in good faith. I post regularly on topics that interest me, which include but are not limited to: political philosophy, world history, world news, philosophy of technology, political activism, cutting edge computer science, resilient community building and futurist scenario-building.

I am married, and we have two small children.

I blog regularly at hewhocutsdown.net.

Below are a few other quotes that capture well how I see the world:

"You are not an atheist if you deny what theists affirm. You are an atheist if you have no use for the concepts and doctrines of theism."

                         John Gray

"You cannot banish unreason simply by believing correct things."

                         Andreas Schou

When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes.

                               Erasmus

Democracy is...the action that constantly wrests the monopoly of public life from oligarchic governments, and the omnipotence over lives from the power of wealth. It is the power that, today more than ever, has to struggle against the confusion of these powers, rolled into one and the same law of domination.

                               Jacques Rancière, Hatred Of Democracy
                                        translated by Steve Corcoran

"Submitting oneself to labor discipline—supervision, control, even the self-control of the ambitious self-employed—does not make one a better person. In most really important ways, it probably makes one worse. To undergo it is a misfortune that at best is sometimes necessary. Yet it’s only when we reject the idea that such labor is virtuous in itself that we can start to ask what is virtuous about labor. To which the answer is obvious. Labor is virtuous if it helps others."

                               David Graeber

Changing our way of thinking about the world is a necessary first step, but it is by no means sufficient: we will need to destratify reality itself, and we must do so without the guarantee of a golden age ahead, knowing full well the dangers and possible restratifications we may face.

                               Manuel de Landa
                               "A Thousand Years Of Nonlinear History"

Anarchism, at least as I understand it, leaves posterity free to develop its own particular systems, in harmony with its needs. Our most vivid imagination cannot forsee the potentialities of a race set free from external restraints. How, then can anyone assume to map out a line of conduct for those to come? We, who pay dearly for every breath of fresh air, must guard against the tendency to fetter the future. If we succeed in clearing the soil from the rubbish of the past and the present, we will leave to posterity the greatest and safest heritage of all ages.

                               Emma Goldman

"The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far."

                               H.P. Lovecraft

"Let's plan for a future where we're all as stupid as we are today."

                         Andreas Schou

"Modern politics is a chapter in the history of religion."

                         
John Gray

"The debate between believers and atheists is confused. The real issue is not whether one should side with believers that assert the reality of the divine and supernatural, and the secular who assert only the reality of the material world or the naturalistic; rather, the debate is between logics of transcendence/sovereignty/patriarchy/state versus logics of immanence/anarchy. The issue of supernatural causation is a historically important issue given our current historical moment, but a sidebar to a much more fundamental issue. For my part, I am an a-theist, not an atheist."

                         Levi Bryant

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Lakeville, MN
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Norman Wells, Northwest Territories, Canada - Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Edmonton, Alberta, Canada - Mahboula, Kuwait - Adan, Kuwait - Hadiya, Kuwait - Sydney, New South Wales, Australia - Burnsville, Minnesota, U.S.A. - Lakeville, Minnesota, U.S.A.
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Jordan Peacock's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Progressives Admiring Themselves in the Mirror
www.arnoldkling.com

From last Sunday's WaPo. 1. E.J. Dionne writes, Many conservatives in the pre-Civil War period opposed the abolition of slavery; many conser

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal
www.smbc-comics.com

January 31, 2016. Discuss this comic in the forum. January 30, 2016. Discuss this comic in the forum. January 29, 2016. Discuss this comic i

Florida mayors to Rubio: We’re going under, take climate change seriously
arstechnica.com

Call on the presidential candidate to meet with them to discuss concerns.

Girlfriend, Mother, Professor?
opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com

My students often have trouble understanding what my true role is. No wonder.

The Suicide of the Liberal Church: Chris Hedges
www.truthdig.com

The liberal denominations and their seminaries, by betraying the poor, especially people of color, in a desperate bid to stay financially so

The Internet Is Being Protected By Two Guys Named Steve
www.buzzfeed.com

The Heartbleed bug put the spotlight on OpenSSL, the security toolkit used by many of the internet's biggest sites and looked after primaril

Tyrone on why Democrats should vote for Donald Trump - Marginal REVOLUTION
marginalrevolution.com

I know that Tyrone, my evil twin brother, has been fairly silent in 2015, but that’s only because he’s been so busy whispering things in my

In his essay on Income Inequality, Paul Graham credited me for pre-publi...
medium.com

“I really struggle with your thinking on this. First off, you disallow any thinking about statistical impact and various…

How “House Hunters” became the most unstoppable juggernaut on TV - The W...
www.washingtonpost.com

The proudly formulaic HGTV show looks nothing like the intricate giants of modern television. So how did it become such a powerhouse?

How to seem telepathic - Marginal REVOLUTION
marginalrevolution.com

This is probably one of the most useful things you will learn from MR all year. It is from Maria Konnikova’s new book The Confidence Game: I

Pseudoscience and Continental Philosophy
platofootnote.wordpress.com

Despite recent loud claims to the contrary, there is a significant difference between two modern styles of doing philosophy: so-called analy

How masks explain the psychology behind online harassment — Sandra Newma...
aeon.co

Every human culture has used masks for ritual disinhibition, shaming and play. Is being online the ultimate masquerade?

How MSG Got A Bad Rap: Flawed Science And Xenophobia
fivethirtyeight.com

As a college student in New York City, I marveled that the city let me eat poached eggs with halloumi cheese and Moroccan spiced pita for br

Women's Hockey Takes Stage As New Pro Sports League
www.npr.org

Founder Dani Rylan launched the league in October with teams in Boston, Buffalo, Connecticut and New York City. For girls who want to play p