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Jordan Peacock
Lives in Lakeville, MN
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If you've never listened, may I highly recommend to you Anathallo, particularly their albums Floating World and Canopy Glow (which this song appears on).
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Various Quotes: Demons by Dostoyevsky

“Just the other day I learned, to my great surprise, but now with perfect certainty, that Stepan Trofimovich had lived among us, in our province, not only not in exile, as we used to think, but that he had never even been under surveillance.” 

[...]

"Our Russian liberal is first of all a lackey, and is merely looking for someone else's boots to clean."

[...]

It seems to me that if there were a man, for example, who would seize a red-hot iron bar and squeeze it in his hand in order to test his toughness, and then, for a whole ten seconds had tried to overcome the unbearable pain and ended by overcoming it, then this man, it seems to me, would have endured something like what Nikolay Vsevolodovich experienced for those ten seconds.

[...]

'It's no allegory, but just a leaf, nothing but a leaf. The leaf is good. Everything is good.'

'Everything?'

'Everything. Man is unhappy because he doesn't know he's happy; that's the only reason. That's everything, everything! Whoever finds out will become happy right away, this minute. This mother-in-law will die, but the little girl will remain - everything is good. I suddenly discovered it.'

'And someone who dies of hunger, and someone who abuses and dishonours a little girl - is that good?'

'It's good. And someone who bashes in that man's head for the child, that's good too; and someone who doesn't bash in his head, that's good too. Everything is good, everything. It's good for all those who know that everything is good.'

[...]

[Quoting Dostoevsky's letters, in an endnote:] Moreover, if someone proved to me that Christ were outside the truth, and it really were that the truth lay outside Christ, I would prefer to remain with Christ rather than with the truth.

[...]

It is a sign of a people's extinction when gods begin to be held in common. [...] If a great people does not have faith that it alone embodies the truth (in itself alone, and in it exclusively), if it does not have faith that it alone has the ability and is called to resurrect all peoples and save them with its truth, then it immediately ceases to be a great people and immediately turns into ethnographic material, and not a great people. A genuinely great people can never reconcile itself to playing a secondary role in humanity or even a primary one, but must stand in the front rank, absolutely and exclusively.

[...]

'You're an atheist because you're a landowner's son, the last son of a landowner. You've lost the distinction between evil and good, because you've stopped recognizing your own people.'
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Justin Weinberg:

People often go nonstop from seeing something as “weird!” to declaring it “unacceptable”! This is one of the ways in which humans are stupid. Resisting this tendency, and instead being open to the idea that other people’s experience of the world could be importantly different from yours and still reasonable, could, I suppose, be called “the new infantilism.” Instead, I call it a kind of “humility.”

People like traditions. This is one of the reasons cruelty persists. The thought is that what happened to me, and how I was treated, should set the template for what happens to you, and how you are treated. One thinks, “I turned out okay, you see? So, if I had to deal with some hardship, young person, you should have to, too. And to relieve you of that hardship would be unnecessary, or worse—to coddle you. Note, by the way, that by sheer coincidence my life contained the optimum amount of hardship; any more would be cruel, and any less would be spoiling.” When we recognize the availability heuristic, self-serving bias, and status quo bias operating like this, rationalizing our callousness, and we then try to block their influence on our judgments and actions, we could, I suppose, call that “the new infantilism.” Instead, I call it a species of “kindness.”

It can be fun to make other people feel bad, especially when one is largely insulated from the consequences of doing so, perhaps through anonymity, or perhaps through power. So, we can imagine a boss who gets a rush from yelling at his employees, or a bathroom stall scribbler who—for a good time—impugns the character of a colleague, or a public spokesperson of philosophy who plumps himself up by blogging that a junior member of the profession is not smart enough to be a philosopher, or who enjoys feeling cocky enough to send an email to a stranger in the profession calling her an asshole. Reining in one’s impulses towards such behavior, objecting to it in others, and pushing for norms against it, could, I’m sure, be called “the new infantilism.” Instead, I just call it part of “professionalism.”

 So, I’m for humility, kindness, and professionalism in philosophy. And I take philosophy to centrally involve rigorous criticism and relentless questioning, so I’m all for that, too. It is not impossible to combine these things.

 [...]

 Consider the restaurant diner who sends back his overcooked steak, the person in line who speaks up when another person tries to cut in front, and the neighbor who threatens to call the cops because a party is too noisy. Do these people need to toughen up? We usually do not think so. Rather, these people show they are sufficiently "tough" by complaining out loud about the problem. The diner breaks social norms about congeniality at dinner, the person in line confronts the cutter, the neighbor risks the hostility of the party's hosts--and we say: good for them. So I find it strange that when people complain out loud about sexism or racism or unprofessionalism or hostility or public mockery or whatever, this is taken as a lack of toughness, rather than evidence of toughness. And further, if we take such complaints as a lack of toughness, why, then, isn't complaining about this lack of toughness itself evidence of a lack of toughness? I mean, these people who are constantly complaining about infantilism and snowflakes and oversensitivity--what wusses! Why can't they handle hearing such complaints? Is it that interacting in a mutually respectful way with a diverse set of people is too hard for them? Would it require them to change too much? Maybe they need to toughen up.

 [...]

 When someone reacts badly to "business as usual" it could be because they are more sensitive than others to the same stimulus, that is, they feel it to a greater degree. Or, it could be because they are more perceptive about the existence and variety of problems with "business as usual," that is, they are able to see different kinds of problems. It is not clear to me why either of these is particularly objectionable, or that we should tell either of these kinds of people to "toughen up."

Take the unusually sensitive. When you avoidably hurt someone--even when you didn't know at the time that was what you were doing--do you think the appropriate response is to say "toughen up"? If so, I have news for you: you're being a jerk. Many of us have probably done this at some point--I know I have. But we know better. When we say "toughen up" to such people, we are saying that having them change their personality is a better option than having us change our behavior. We rarely see that made explicit, let alone seriously considered and defended.

Now look at the unusually perceptive. Here, toughness is beside the point. They are pointing out problems to us that we might not have noticed. Shouldn't we be paying attention to what they're saying and trying to learn from it rather than complaining about it?

None of this is to say that people can't be overly sensitive (in the sense that it would be unreasonable for them to demand accommodation), or mistaken in their complaints. But when I hear the sensitive being told to "toughen up" or those pointing out new problems being waved away, I don't see the work being done to support these dismissals. What I see is laziness and status quo bias, not to mention a wholly unwarranted and self-serving epistemic overconfidence.
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That is super cool.  It's like a beautiful diagram of my philosophical catechism.

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Adam Gurri:

When we speak of “facts” or “data” as though they are givens, we overlook the role of judgment in creating these things. It is for this reason that R. D. Laing argues that we should abandon the word “data” which at root means “something given” and instead refer to “capta,” meaning at root “something seized.”

When the results of a survey come out, we tend to think that interpretation is just involved in how we generalize it, or what we use those results as a proxy for. In fact, interpretation came in at the very beginning, when the survey questions were formulated, and when the respondents were selected. 

[...]

Researchers have a bag of tricks to attempt to compensate for such known problems, but each trick has risks and problems of its own. The right mix is a matter of judgment, and having it accepted is a matter of persuasion. Each mix is contestable, but so are the standards from the previous step; in fact all four parts are completely contestable.

[...]

One of the things that I found jarring about The Rhetoric of Economics is that McCloskey argues, among other things, that appeals to authority are natural and necessary. That pointing out that an argument involves an appeal to authority does not invalidate that argument. After the Enlightenment, the idea that authority is involved in knowledge at all is a heresy—is not truth manifest?

But truth is not manifest; we are not capable of seeing a perfect, unblemished Truth. Instead, we must interpret the world and use our judgment, and engage that judgment with the judgments that have been made by others. 

[...]

All human accomplishments occur within the realm of human capabilities. This is as true for knowledge as it is for constructing a skyscraper. There is no external validator, there are just human beings with minds capable of making judgments, informed by conceptual schemes and specific ideas and ongoing conversations in various forms.

[...]

All knowledge is political, in Will Wilkinson’s sense:

By political I mean contested, negotiated, and normatively binding. Coercion is a limiting case of rule enforcement and not the essence of the political, in this sense."

[...]

Aristotle and Kling’s point is that some things are irreducibly imprecise beyond a certain level—and I would agree with them.

[...]

 Klein’s main complaint is that economists reduce all knowledge to mere information. Information in this view is something you either have or you don’t. But in the real world, treating something like information requires judgment. Deciding that something you perceive has implications for the future price of some commodity is an active process, for which you must take responsibility.
Even Heterodox Economics is Misguided Earlier this week, Arnold Kling---who taught the first economics class I ever took---wrote a post comparing behaviorism in psychology to Samuelsonianism in eco...
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Judgment cannot be avoided, only wisely practiced or blissfully ignored. 

Jordan Peacock

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Slavoj Žižek

In our permissive times, a new form of the unsayable is more and more acquiring a ­central role: it is not only that certain things are prohibited to say – the prohibition itself is prohibited: we are not allowed to say openly what is prohibited.

Already in Stalinism, it was not only prohibited to criticise Stalin and the party publicly, it was even more prohibited to announce this prohibition publicly. If someone were to shout back at a critic of Stalin, “Are you crazy? Don’t you know that we are not allowed to do this?” he would have disappeared into the Gulag even faster than the open critic of Stalin. Unexpectedly, the same holds for the relations of domination in our permissive post-patriarchal societies: a modern boss is tolerant, he behaves like a colleague of ours, sharing dirty jokes, inviting us for a drink, openly displaying his weaknesses, admitting that he is “merely human like us”. He is deeply offended if we remind him that he is our boss – however, it is this very rejection of explicit authority that guarantees his de facto power.

This is why the first gesture of liberation is to force the master to act as one: our only defence is to reject his “warm human” approach and to insist that he should treat us with cold distance. We live in weird times in which we are compelled to behave as if we are free, so that the unsayable is not our freedom but the very fact of our servitude.

and Nick Cave:

The lovely thing about the unsayable is that it is unsaid. As soon as it is said, it is sayable and loses all its mystery and ambiguity. Art exists so that the unsayable can be said without having to actually say it. We cloud it in secrecy and obfuscation. The mind is free to roam and all things can be imagined, under the cover of darkness. How nice that is. The unsayable. How tired we are of having things explained to us. Having things said. How nice it is, when people just shut the fuck up.

http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/2015/05/what-can-t-you-say-stephen-fry-slavoj-i-ek-elif-shafak-and-more-say-unsayable
Writers, activists and public figures from around the world respond to NS guest editors Neil Gaiman and Amanda Palmer’s request to reveal the thoughts they leave unspoken.
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Reading Together: Demons  - 
 
Assorted quotes:

It seems to me that if there were a man, for example, who would seize a red-hot iron bar and squeeze it in his hand in order to test his toughness, and then, for a whole ten seconds had tried to overcome the unbearable pain and ended by overcoming it, then this man, it seems to me, would have endured something like what Nikolay Vsevolodovich experienced for those ten seconds.

[...]

'It's no allegory, but just a leaf, nothing but a leaf. The leaf is good. Everything is good.'

'Everything?'

'Everything. Man is unhappy because he doesn't know he's happy; that's the only reason. That's everything, everything! Whoever finds out will become happy right away, this minute. This mother-in-law will die, but the little girl will remain - everything is good. I suddenly discovered it.'

'And someone who dies of hunger, and someone who abuses and dishonours a little girl - is that good?'

'It's good. And someone who bashes in that man's head for the child, that's good too; and someone who doesn't bash in his head, that's good too. Everything is good, everything. It's good for all those who know that everything is good.'

[...]

[Quoting Dostoevsky's letters, in an endnote:] Moreover, if someone proved to me that Christ were outside the truth, and it really were that the truth lay outside Christ, I would prefer to remain with Christ rather than with the truth.

[...]

It is a sign of a people's extinction when gods begin to be held in common. [...] If a great people does not have faith that it alone embodies the truth (in itself alone, and in it exclusively), if it does not have faith that it alone has the ability and is called to resurrect all peoples and save them with its truth, then it immediately ceases to be a great people and immediately turns into ethnographic material, and not a great people. A genuinely great people can never reconcile itself to playing a secondary role in humanity or even a primary one, but must stand in the front rank, absolutely and exclusively.

[...]

'You're an atheist because you're a landowner's son, the last son of a landowner. You've lost the distinction between evil and good, because you've stopped recognizing your own people.'
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Pairs well with Season 3 of Vikings.
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Years ago I saw this performance at a friends house (on Betamax, I think), and it blew me away.

I went on to listen to a couple albums, and was thoroughly unimpressed.

Coming back to this now, it's clear that I wasn't wrong before: the albums are simply unlistenable compared to the live recordings.
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Stephen Cave:

Herostratus was a young man about whom we know only one fact: that on the night of 21 July 356 BCE, he set fire to the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus. This temple, 120 years in the building, was one of the seven wonders of the world. Visited by pilgrims, kings and tourists, it was gargantuan: some 400 feet long, 180 feet wide and 40 feet high — the size of a football stadium. By all accounts, it was sublime. The fire destroyed it utterly. Herostratus did nothing to hide his guilt, but gave himself up freely and, like Breivik, admitted his crime. When asked why he had committed this terrible act, he replied: to become famous.

To discourage copycats, Herostratus was not only tortured and executed. He was also subjected to a damnatio memoriae — the damnation of a man’s memory through banning (on pain of death) all mention of his name. 

[...]

That his ideology legitimates, for Breivik, his actions and ascribes him the role of hero is why he is afraid of being dismissed as a raving lunatic. It is also why it is crucial, both as the proper punishment and as the proper deterrent to would-be emulators, that his ideology is indeed dismissed as the self-justifying rantings of a narcissist.

[...]

The dilemma that the judges faced was that they could only dismiss his mad 1,500-page manifesto and self-serving world-view by deciding that Breivik was suffering from a serious mental illness such as psychosis, which would have resulted in him not being criminally responsible for his actions.

The judges rightly decided that this was unacceptable: just as satisfaction for the victims and their families requires that Breivik be held fully accountable for his crimes, so does the possibility of regarding him with the appropriate contempt. It is manifestly not right to mock or scorn those who are genuinely mentally ill. So let Breivik be sane — he does not, in any case, quite fit any of the current diagnoses that would prevent him from being accountable for his actions.

[...]

Breivik’s ideology is an attempt to make exactly this unclear; to make his abominable act seem noble. [...] The point of convicting someone of a Herostratic crime would be to say: we hold you accountable, but also find you risible. It should send the message that we as a society have seen through your attempt to hide your villainy with a veil of ideology; that we regard your views as nothing more than the product of a pathetic craving for attention that is so self-regarding that it has no compunction about sacrificing the lives of others. 

http://aeon.co/magazine/society/stephen-cave-anders-breivik/
The ruling that Anders Breivik is sane leaves his ideas unchallenged. We need a new verdict for crimes of vainglory
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I'm just relieved he wasn't found insane because I am tired of the myth that people who commit violent crime are "mentally ill".  People with a diagnosis of mental illness are more likely to be victims of violent crime than the population at large, and are less likely to be perpetrators of violent crime.  www.rethink.org.nz

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Appreciated the anecdotes about playing in Fela Kuti's band back in the day in the interview with Dele Sosimi (~30:00), and the playlist generally.
Dele Sosimi chats about joining Fela Kuti's band in his early teens, about Afrobeat as a music of the people, and his new album. Also guesting is evergreen London-based producer, Dego, of Reinforced, 4Hero, and 2000 Black fame. In the mix: Typesun, Nicola Cruz, Trails & Ways, plus vintage sounds from Tunisia.
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"I missed the world in general. Seeing things move, seeing cars, dogs, the sun."
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Currently
Lakeville, MN
Previously
Norman Wells, Northwest Territories, Canada - Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Edmonton, Alberta, Canada - Mahboula, Kuwait - Adan, Kuwait - Hadiya, Kuwait - Sydney, New South Wales, Australia - Burnsville, Minnesota, U.S.A. - Lakeville, Minnesota, U.S.A.
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Introduction
I like the stars. It's the illusion of permanence, I think. I mean, they're always flaring up and caving in and going out. But from here, I can pretend... I can pretend that things last. I can pretend that lives last longer than moments. Gods come, and gods go. Mortals flicker and flash and fade. Worlds don't last; and stars and galaxies are transient, fleeting things that twinkle like fireflies and vanish into cold and dust. But I can pretend.

                               Neil Gaiman "The Sandman"

I'm a metaphysical realist, posthumanist, autodidact, infovore.

I'm intellectually promiscuous, and love provocative engagements in good faith. I post regularly on topics that interest me, which include but are not limited to: political philosophy, world history, world news, philosophy of technology, political activism, cutting edge computer science, resilient community building and futurist scenario-building.

I am married, and we have two small children.

I blog regularly at hewhocutsdown.net.

Below are a few other quotes that capture well how I see the world:

"You are not an atheist if you deny what theists affirm. You are an atheist if you have no use for the concepts and doctrines of theism."

                         John Gray

"You cannot banish unreason simply by believing correct things."

                         Andreas Schou

When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes.

                               Erasmus

Democracy is...the action that constantly wrests the monopoly of public life from oligarchic governments, and the omnipotence over lives from the power of wealth. It is the power that, today more than ever, has to struggle against the confusion of these powers, rolled into one and the same law of domination.

                               Jacques Rancière, Hatred Of Democracy
                                        translated by Steve Corcoran

"Submitting oneself to labor discipline—supervision, control, even the self-control of the ambitious self-employed—does not make one a better person. In most really important ways, it probably makes one worse. To undergo it is a misfortune that at best is sometimes necessary. Yet it’s only when we reject the idea that such labor is virtuous in itself that we can start to ask what is virtuous about labor. To which the answer is obvious. Labor is virtuous if it helps others."

                               David Graeber

Changing our way of thinking about the world is a necessary first step, but it is by no means sufficient: we will need to destratify reality itself, and we must do so without the guarantee of a golden age ahead, knowing full well the dangers and possible restratifications we may face.

                               Manuel de Landa
                               "A Thousand Years Of Nonlinear History"

Anarchism, at least as I understand it, leaves posterity free to develop its own particular systems, in harmony with its needs. Our most vivid imagination cannot forsee the potentialities of a race set free from external restraints. How, then can anyone assume to map out a line of conduct for those to come? We, who pay dearly for every breath of fresh air, must guard against the tendency to fetter the future. If we succeed in clearing the soil from the rubbish of the past and the present, we will leave to posterity the greatest and safest heritage of all ages.

                               Emma Goldman

"The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far."

                               H.P. Lovecraft

"Let's plan for a future where we're all as stupid as we are today."

                         Andreas Schou

"Modern politics is a chapter in the history of religion."

                         
John Gray

"The debate between believers and atheists is confused. The real issue is not whether one should side with believers that assert the reality of the divine and supernatural, and the secular who assert only the reality of the material world or the naturalistic; rather, the debate is between logics of transcendence/sovereignty/patriarchy/state versus logics of immanence/anarchy. The issue of supernatural causation is a historically important issue given our current historical moment, but a sidebar to a much more fundamental issue. For my part, I am an a-theist, not an atheist."

                         Levi Bryant

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Jordan Peacock's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
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