Profile

Cover photo
Jordan Peacock
Lives in Lakeville, MN
6,200 followers|4,323,779 views
AboutPostsCollections+1's

Stream

Jordan Peacock
moderator

Favorite Quotes  - 
 
Icelandic inheritance law 
3
Add a comment...

Jordan Peacock
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
I'll just leave this here..

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=11803165
This wasn't actually for my students, and dates back to the early 90s. A number of people at Anderson Consulting (now Accenture) asked for my "top ten" books. This is not possible for anyone who reads extensively, so I came out with that list as a bare start. I should mention that reading lots ...
2
AB Helton's profile photoJordan Peacock's profile photo
3 comments
 
From this list I've read:

Mind and Society by Lev Vygotsky
The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind by Julian Jaynes
Republic by Plato
The Visual Display of Quantitative Information by Edward Tufte
The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins
The Federalist Papers

and I feel like I've absorbed a number of these through secondary sources (Minsky, Dewey, Mumford, etc).
Add a comment...

Jordan Peacock
moderator

What Are You Reading?  - 
 
Some updates.

First of all, because I'm a huge philosophy geek, I excitedly preordered these two books that I've been watching the progress of for literally years:

An English translation of Simondon's 'On the Mode of Existence of Technical Objects':
http://www.univocalpublishing.com/univocal-books/on-the-mode-of-existence-of-technical-objects

and Adam Kotsko's treatise on the devil, 'The Prince of This World':
https://itself.wordpress.com/2016/04/29/the-prince-of-this-world-is-available-for-pre-order/

The other thing was recognizing how I tend to find books, novels in particular, at all. My wife was asking me was led to the novels currently on my stack (Jo Walton's The Just City, Alvaro Enrigue's Sudden Death and Maureen F. McHugh's China Mountain Zhang).

The answer was telling: Walton was via the Crooked Timber group blog, they have been doing a symposium on it. Past symposiums have covered non-fiction such as Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century and Graeber's Debt: The First 5,000 Years and novels such as Stross' bibliography and Spufford's Red Plenty. I've read Among Others by Walton, which was pretty good (although not the 6/5 stars I was hearing from other people), but the conceit of a novel in which Athena pulls Sokrates, Boethius, Proclus, Plotinus, etc. into pre-cataclysm Atlantis to build Plato's republic was pure Jordan-candy. And I just finished vol. 2 of A History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps which focused substantially on these Neoplatonists. So, there's that.

Enrigue I'd never heard of, but Warren Ellis reviewed Sudden Death in his newsletter as follows:

"SUDDEN DEATH by Alvaro Enrigue is fucking superb. The translator, Natasha Wimmer, produces a sensitive and nimble translation of what must have been a murderous enterprise. Enrigue frames the end of the Renaissance and the conquest of Mexico in... a tennis game. He achieves that marvellous thing of connecting all the moving parts of the transition of an age in a single bloody tennis game and all the threads that come off it. Very few people can pull this particular stunt off properly, and we have to add Enrigue to that short list. And Enrigue doesn't give a fuck - he sticks emails in there, stops dead to address the audience like a writer/presenter of rhetorical television, even discussing and explaining the mechanics of the book itself. It's big, audacious, smart, funny, learned, gory, occasionally lit with anger, and he spins it all together into a swirling fugue of a crescendo. I burned through it in three nights. One of the essential reads of the year, I think."

Finally, China Moutain Zhang came up not once, but three times, once with the high praise of "my favourite science fiction novel of all time" at the local science fiction convention I attended last month. Having not heard of it before, I was immediately intrigued... more so the more I learned of it.

So short answer: find people with excellent taste. Poach from them.
1
AB Helton's profile photo
 
I have Sudden Death checked out from the library, but it's looking like I'll have to return it before I get a chance to read it, on account of unexpected travel. The wait for it wasn't long this time, but I can't guarantee this will be the case next time. I might just buy it.
Add a comment...

Jordan Peacock

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Computing the uncomputable

Last month the logician +Joel David Hamkins proved a surprising result: you can compute uncomputable functions!  

Of course there's a catch, but it's still interesting.

Alan Turing showed that a simple kind of computer, now called a Turing machine, can calculate a lot of functions.  In fact we believe Turing machines can calculate anything you can calculate with any fancier sort of computer.  So we say a function is computable if you can calculate it with some Turing machine.

Some functions are computable, others aren't.  That's a fundamental fact.

But there's a loophole.

We think we know what the natural numbers are:

0, 1, 2, 3, ...

and how to add and multiply them.  We know a bunch of axioms that describe this sort of arithmetic: the Peano axioms.  But these axioms don't completely capture our intuitions!  There are facts about natural numbers that most mathematicians would agree are true, but can't be proved from the Peano axioms.

Besides the natural numbers you think you know - but do you really? - there are lots of other models of arithmetic.  They all obey the Peano axioms, but they're different.  Whenever there's a question you can't settle using the Peano axioms, it's true in some model of arithmetic and false in some other model.

There's no way to decide which model of arithmetic is the right one - the so-called "standard" natural numbers.   

Hamkins showed there's a Turing machine that does something amazing.  It can compute any function from the natural numbers to the natural numbers, depending on which model of arithmetic we use. 

In particular, it can compute the uncomputable... but only in some weird "alternative universe" where the natural numbers aren't what we think they are. 

These other universes have "nonstandard" natural numbers that are bigger than the ones you understand.   A Turing machine can compute an uncomputable function... but it takes a nonstandard number of steps to do so.

So: computing the computable takes a "standard" number of steps.   Computing the uncomputable takes a little longer.

This is not a practical result.  But it shows how strange simple things like logic and the natural numbers really are.

For a better explanation, read my blog post:

https://johncarlosbaez.wordpress.com/2016/04/02/computing-the-uncomputable/

And for the actual proof, go on from there to the blog article by +Joel David Hamkins.
42 comments on original post
1

Jordan Peacock

Shared publicly  - 
1

Jordan Peacock
moderator

What Are You Reading?  - 
 
new arrivals 
3
Add a comment...

Jordan Peacock

Shared publicly  - 
 
Hot Earth Dreams
Frank Landis

The Trap of Binary Logic

We apparently can't live in this enormous biosphere that we evolved in, this incredible planet that provides us with notionally free air, water, gravity, and meteor and radiation shielding, therefore our only hope is to pack ourselves into cans where all elements have to be totally recycled, where we hope our radiation and meteor shields are good enough, and where we're spun up to provide a centrifugal simulacrum of gravity, because, of course, we can more easily live packed in a can for 1,000 years traveling to Alpha Centauri B than we can for 1,000 years on this planet. Once we arrive at Our New Home, either we wil colonize a totally alien biosphere after 1,000 years of living in a tightly confined, very simple ecosystem, or we'll terraform some planet or other to be just like the Earth we couldn't live on before, only simpler. The alternative is that we'll all go extinct, because we "obviously" can't live here.

Yes, that was very sarcastic, but it's incredibly easy to fall into these kinds of false dichotomies when we speculate about the future: Progress or extinction. People or the environment. Civilization or nature. Singularity or apocalypse.

Mosaic World

As the wildlands get broken into smaller and smaller fragments, as the critical connections between them become more tenuous, they become more fragile. Our conservation plans, with their connectivity patterns, richness studies, and core habitats surrounded by development, now these all have to contend with a climate that's changing all the habitat parameters. Will the migration corridors work, or will they break?

Apocalypse or Singularity or ???

The most fragile thing is our global civilization. Our species is less fragile than civilization, the biosphere is less fragile than our species, and the planet is less fragile than the biosphere. While many people are justifiably horrified by how much destruction we can cause at present, the best we can now do is to destroy civilization, or possibly our species if we go for something extra-special, super-duper, inhumanly stupid.

The Fart That Broke Civilization

This is our civilization's most enduring contribution to the future of life on Earth: 1,000 to 1,400 gigatonnes of carbon (henceforth abbreviated GtC) breaking into the wind over the next 100 to 1,000 years. If you remember your unit prefixes, 1 tera is 1,000 gigas, so we're going to emit 1 to 1.4 teratonnes of carbon.

Let's call it the terafart. [...] Unlike a far, [...] the remnants of our outgasses carbon will be airborne for up to 400,000 years.

[...]

The ocean will take up about half the carbon in 1,000 to 1,500 years, becoming acid enough to kill off coral reefs. Carbonate reactions will then take up to 40,000 years to take our about half of the carbon that's left, dissolving some really lovely islands and reefs. It will take up to 400,000 years for non-carbonate rocks to take the last of our fart out of the atmosphere.

[...]

To begin with, the terafart will most likely raise the global average temperature about 3-5°C (5-9°F) by 2100, a degree or three above the 2°C (3.5°F) that experts and politicians have compromised on as our safe upper limit for climate change.

[...]

Hot air can, of course, make deserts hotter and lead to longer and deeper droughts. But hot air can also absorb more water vapor than cold air can. This leads to greater humidity and long, hot, humid summers, and it can also lead to bigger storms, which occur when hot air cools enough that the water condenses out. Climate scientists currently believe there won't be more storms, but the storms that will occur will likely be bigger and slower moving. The combination of giant storms and deep droughts leads to things like massive flash floods and heavy erosion, since dry soil can't immediately absorb massive amounts of water.

[...]

[Footnote:] I know that the terafart won't "cause" each storm, because storms happen regardless. Similarly, steroids don't cause home runs in baseball, because there were home runs before the steroids era of the 1990s. Nonetheless, both the number and distance of the home runs during the steroids era are larger than seen before or (hopefully) since. In baseball terms, our terafart is juicing our weather, and unlike baseball, the CO2 will stay in our system for a long time after we stop injecting it.

[...]

High humidity at high temperature can kill humans and other large mammals. At a "wet bulb temperature" above about 35°C (95°F), humans stop being able to shed heat from our bodies by sweating, which means that, basically, we can't live under those conditions without air conditioning. I'll call this condition "black flag weather," as that is the color of the flag the US Marine Corps flies when wet bulb temperature gets around 32°C (90°F). Since, among large mammals, humans are actually among the best at getting rid of waste heat through sweating, black flag weather represents a death zone for us, our livestock, and many wild mammals. [...] Under the extreme climate change we're talking about here, there will be extended episodes of black flag weather over much of the western Sahara, much of the Middle East, Red Sea, and Persian Gulf, the Australian Outback, much of India, much of China, much of central Brazil, part of Spain, and much of the southeastern US. These places may be habitable seasonally in the cooler and drier months, but humans and other large mammals will have to migrate away from these zones during the hottest and most humid months. Black flag weather has the potential to displace more people than sea level rise, and unfortunately, it's much less studied.

[...]

History seems to show that changes in global average temperatures cause chaos. For example, about 1 to 2°C of cooling in the 17th Century, during the heart of the Little Ice Age, coincided with a period historians call the "General Crisis," which marked the chaotic era between the end of the Renaissance and the beginning of the Enlightenment in Europe (with civil wars, revolts, and famines across the continent), the fall of the Ming dynasty to the Qing dynasty in China, the Mughal Civil War in Asia Minor, the fall of the Kongo kingdom in West Africa, and colonial wars throughout the Americas.

[...]

If we're very lucky, East Antarctica won't melt. This rather large patch of Antarctica, which includes the South Pole, averages something like 4,800 m (15,700 feet) in elavation. Roughly 3,000 meters (years, 3 kilometers, or about 10,000 feet) of that is ice. East Antarctica has an annual temperature of -57°C (-70°F), and a high recorded temperature at the South Pole of -12.3°C (9.9°F). The East Antarctic ice sheet is currently increasing in size, not decreasing, due to increased snowfall, and even 16°C of terafart-added temperature increase will rarely bring it above freezing, especially since most of the increase is modeled to occur in the winter, when it is at its coldest.

This is definitely not the case for West Antarctica nor for Greenland, which is why these smaller ice sheets will melt into the ocean over the next century or three.

[...]

If all the glaciers melt, they will add about 70 meters (230 feet) to mean sea level, according to David Archer.

[...]

As the West Antarctic Ice Sheet disintegrates over the next 200-300 years or so, sea levels will rise by perhaps 4.8 meters (16 feet), with 3.3 meters (11 feet) of rise happening in spurts in the weeks and months after catastrophic ice sheet failures. [...] The already-melting Greenland ice sheet will contribute another 6 to 7 meters (20 to 23 feet) of sea level over the coming centuries. Finally, the East Antarctic ice sheet will contribute perhaps 55 meters (180 feet) to sea level rise if it melts. This is why I earnestly hope that East Antarctica stays frozen, although I assume it will not here.

[...]

Global civilization, even the primitive global civilization pioneered by the Romans and later by the Muslim Indian Ocean trade, depends on shipping between ports, and those ports are going to be repeatedly destroyed by rising sea levels for the next century.

[...]

Coasts rise and fall on their own due to continental drift, independent of what the ocean is doing. A few coasts are rising so fast they can stay ahead of of the ocean's thermal expansion. Some are subsiding so fast that they'll be over a meter underwater in a century even without sea level rise. These are natural processes. It means that some places, like the subsiding Tacloban City in the Philippines, which was destroyed by super-typhoon Haiyan, are even more at risk than the averages suggest.

Long Tails, Dragon Kings, and Black Swans

A dragon king even is one that is much bigger than predicted. [...] The king "is an 'outlier', with a wealth many times larger than predicted by the extrapolation of the Pareto distribution" of the rest of the population.

Human Nature

Because culture mutates so fast, it moderates the impacts of environment on DNA, thereby weakening environmental selective forces on our genes. Where our genes seem to be evolving is in areas related to culture, for instance dealing with processing culturally relevant chemicals such as lactose, gluten, sucrose, and capsaicin, or with surviving epidemic diseases.

[...]

In a weird way, milk is the food of freedom, because it gives nomadic herders a way to get away from oppressive regimes based on controlling farmers, and their herds allow them to flee beyond any pursuer's ability to forage for supplies. As one nomad poem has it: "Do not cultivate the vineyard; you'll be bound/ Do not cultivate grains; you'll be ground/ Pull the camel, herd the sheep/ A day will come, you'll be crowned".

[...]

Tissues in the human body have different energy requirements, and two of the most energy-intensive organ systems are our brains and our guts. Some scientists suggest that there's a trade-off between the two. The idea is that an organism can attain a limited amount of food resources, and this limits how many resources can go to brains or guts. Guts are a good thing, because they allow animals to digest difficult food but common sources, while brains are good because they allow animals to find rare but easy and valuable food sources. Given the energy constraints in food, the theorists believe that you can't have both large guts and large brains.

[...]

The 2,000 "calories" a day we're said to need is a gross underestimate. We've got to count the fuel we burn to cook our food and keep us warm, something no nutritionist does.

The Difficult Problems

Dunbar's number limits the size of non-hierarchical groups. [...] [Groupthink mental modeling] is a way to get around the limits of Dunbar's number. It's a model for how the members of a group behave in common situations, how you are supposed to behave as a member of a group. People don't have to have mental models of every individual in the group, if everyone follows the norms of the group they all belong to. All they have to do is know those norms and follow them.

Fish Traps and the Theory of Competitive Control

[David Kilcullen's] Theory of Competitive Control states, "In irregular conflicts, [...] the local armed actor that a given population perceives as best able to establish a predictable, consistent, wide-spectrum normative system of control is most likely to dominate that population and its residential area".

Greenhouse, Icehouse, PETM

According to geologists, the Earth has spent something like four-fifths of the last 400,000,000 years in greenhouse mode, rather than in icehouse mode. According to the modelers, this has to do quite a lot with the clumping of continents to limit coastline and coastal erosion, and to the absence of big, highly erodible young mountain ranges like the Himalayas. Icehouse Earths like our own tend to have smaller continents that are relatively spread out, with long, erodible coasts, and big, rapidly growing, quickly eroding mountain ranges that can weather carbon out of the air as the wind and rain chew them down.

[...]

The PETM [Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum] ended the Paleocene epoch and started the Eocene epoch about 55,800,000 years ago, and lasted for 100,000 to 200,000 years. Yes, that interval should look hauntingly familiar, because it's about how long the coming Altithermal is likely to last unless we get 1,400 GtC airborne, in which case it will last 400,000.

[...]

The problem with the PETM as a model is that both the Paleocene that preceded it and the Eocene that succeeded it were greenhouse worlds

[...]

One could imagine a future Arctic city, perhaps at the mouth of the Mackenzie River, in a landscape that looked a bit like New York's Central Park, a bit like an old-timey town on the upper Mississippi River.

[...]

California gets most of its rain in the winter and is mostly dry in the summer, while the Carolinas at exactly the same latitude get rain in the summer. The major difference is ocean currents.

The Trap of Cyclic Thinking

It took over 1,000 years for iron to become an everyday item and not a precious metal. The interesting thing is that Europe went through a Dark Age at the end of the Bronze Age, right as knowledge of ironsmithing and everyday iron objects and weapons spread out of the Middle East. It's possible that that terrible early Dark Age was exacerbated by the spread of ironsmithing through the trading networks that had sustained the European Bronze Age. After all, if ironwork is everywhere, why trade Baltic amber and slave girls for bronze? And if your local god-kings no longer monopolize the tool and weapon trade, why not defy them instead of deifying them? [...] Ironsmithing is a ratchet technology, one of many. If and when our civilization collapses, I don't think we'll forget how to smelt or work iron and steel. We just won't build skyscrapers out of them, because we won't have the fuel to create such colossal ironworks.

Five Extinction Events

A rather heterodox theory [about the end of the Devonian] posits that the previously unprecedented great forests would have sucked CO2 out of the air, lowering temperatures and promoting glaciers (for which there is evidence). It's also possible tha the tree roots weathered rocks into soil faster, freeing nutrients that flowed into the ocean and thereby produced anoxic zones in the ocean (for which there is also evidence). Finally, there were no wood-rotting fungi or termites around at the time, so most of the carbon locked into the wood was buried as coal, rather than getting cycled back into the biosphere by something that produced the enzyne cellulase.

[...]

If the Deccan Traps and the Siberian Traps could cause or exacerbate mass extinctions, the CAMP [Central Atlantic Magmatic Province] is at least a candidate for dumping huge amounts of CO2 into the ocean and atmosphere and causing trouble.

[...]
Neither of the largest LIPs [Large Igneous Province] in Earth's history was associated with a big spike in extinctions, nor do they begin or end geologic periods. Both of them were apparently slower and mostly underwater, and that might have made all the difference.

[...]

Assuming we survive the mess we're making, everything that survives along with us will be well-adapted to surviving around, with, on, in, or in spite of us. This should not be a comforting thought.

Extinction, Fragmentation, and Invasion

Enemy release was used for centuries before it because a scientific theory. From 1492 on, Europeans transported crops around the world, finding new places where they could grow without the enemies that killed the crops in their native range. This is why the great colonial powers transferred rubber to Malaysia from Brazil, and chocolate, coffee, and sugar cane around the world. It's a great trick, so long as the enemies don't get transferred too.

[...]

Many invasive species are actually quite genetically uniform, for in expanding from a small immigrant population they have only a small proportion of the genetic diversity that the ancestral population has. This uniformity makes invaders quite vulnerable to any enemy that can kill them efficiently. As a result, invasive species can vanish as quickly as they explode, as happened with the prickly pears in Australia. Enemy release is a temporary phenomena, but a released invader can cause tremendous changes before its enemies find it.

Climate change affects invasibility. Remember that an invasion is an process of colonization and establishment beyond a former range? Climate change is going to change every habitat, and most species that survive the coming changes will have to colonize and establish beyond their present ranges. This means that they will have to transport themselves (or get transported) to suitable habitats, and establish new populations there, until they spread to another place.

Why Conserve?

Politics can wipe out agricultural diversity. When the US occupied Iraq in 2004, Paul Bremer, the head of the US Provisional Authority, signed Order 81, which prohibited Iraqi farmers from saving their own seed to sow in their fields, as they had done for over 7,000 years. Irqi agriculture was supposed to become dependent on patented crops brought from the US and controlled by US agribusiness. This strategy was originally devised by Henry Kissinger in the 1970s as a way of pacifying occupied areas through making them utterly dependent on US agribusiness. Since Order 81 went into effect, Iraq has gone from being a net exporter of food to being a net importer, as left the land to find jobs that pay enough to support their families.

[...]

What we do now will matter for the next 10,000,000 years.

Why 10,000,000 years? That's about how long the paleontologists believe it took the Earth to recover after four of the five mass extinctions. After a mass extinction, recovery is through evolution, not through a diverse mix of species migrating out of refugia. Mass extinctions are not the end of all species, but re-evolving the survivors to something like our current diversity will take something like 10,000,000 years. This is a very, very, very, very long time.

It's better to not lose that diversity in the first place.

The Trap of Collapse

China's story emphasizes transformation and continuity, while Europe's story emphasizes collapse and fragmentation. Is either story more useful for modern civilization?

Peak Madness

Demand hardening can affect any peaking resource. If we use efficiency to support more people rather than banking surpluses, we harden demand to the point where a supply system has to work all the time, and any shortfall is an emergency.

Hohokam 2.0/Anasazi 2.0/Atlantis 2.0

Modern buildings are built with steel, copper, and all sorts of useful stuff. Given how hard it is to mine these elements even today, we can expet that modern and future skyscrapers will be broken up for srap, rather than repurposed, especially as disintegrating concrete makes them unsafe to occupy.

[...]

[Quoting Stewart Brand:] "Digital information lasts forever—or five years, whichever comes first"

[...]

[On the Seuss effect:] Because plants prefer ^12C and because ^14C decays, fossil fuels [...] are extraordinarily rich in ^12C. When we burn large amounts of fossil fuels as we are doing now, we enrich the air with ^12C, thereby diluting the amount of ^13C and ^14C in the air, thereby throwing off every study that uncritically uses the ratio of ^12C to these other two isotopes as a chronological marker. [...] Nuclear weapon explosions produce a lot of ^14C, and during that time, atmospheric ^14C concentrations roughly doubled. If people know about this, it forms a great label, for all plant material that grew during the atomic era has elevated levels of ^14C slowly decaying away, whether it's now wine, leather, or wood. Because it contains too much ^14C, carbon from this time appears anomalously young. For example, someone born in 1956 CE has the ^14C profile of a person born around 5300 CE. Still, all that ^14C was absorbed into the biosphere and deposited in sediments pretty quickly. Bomb carbon effect currently overrides the Seuss effect. [...] In between bomb carbon and the Seuss effect, the 20th and 21st Centuries will be largely invisible to simple carbon-14 dating. ^14C speciments from the first half of the 20th century and all the 21st Century will seem centuries too old, specimens from the last half of the 20th century will seem centuries too young.

Connections and Local Technology

Gill also notes that back in the 18th Century the relative cost ratios for transportation were 1 if by sea (the baseline), 4.4 if by river, or 22.6 if over land, so that land transport was considered under five percent as efficient as maritime transport. In the 17th Century, it took about as long to get from London to Edinburgh by carriage as it took to get from London to South Africa by sea.

Polar Seesaws, Black Flags, and Dead Zones

Remember all those stories of how cold the snow was when your grandparents were children, the ones you blew off as tall tales, irrelevant to your life? The weather experiences that formed you as a child will be even more irrelevant to your children and grandchildren, just as their experience will be irrelevant to their offspring, and so on for [the] next ten generations or so of their descendants. Assuming they have any.

[...]

After 200 years, with the Greenland and West Antarctic sheets melted, the sea will have invaded many of the major rivers, sometimes for hundreds of miles. Salt water may reach Manaus on the Amazon, Boma on the Congo, Cairo on the Nile, Baton Rouge on the Mississippi, Nanjing on the Yangtze, past the Tonle Sap in Cambodia on the Mekong, to Sacramento and Portland on the US west coast, and upstream past London to Bracknell on the Thomas. Low lying coasts will also be flooded, including most of the Netherlands, the Yangtze Delta well past Shanghai, the Nile Delta, the Mississippi Delta, over half of Bangladesh, eastern Iraq on the Persian Gulf, and much of southern Vietnam and Cambodia, including Ho Chi Minh City.

[...]

Some, like the paleontologist Peter Ward, believe that deep anoxic waters are perhaps too good a carbon trap, but only in the short term. Ward is a proponent of a theory that methane-producing bacteria built up in the waters of the late Permian ocean, and that a gigantic belch of methane caused the P-T mass extinction. There's some evidence to say it happened, with the Siberian Traps perhaps aiding and abetting the bacteria.

[...]

Jellyfish are distant relatives of coral, so there's a certain symmetry to going from cnidarians that secrete limestone (corals) to cnidarians that do not (jellyfish). Unfortunately, swarms of jellies won't support quite the biodiversity of coral reefs

Fern Spike Earth

Now it would be wonderful is all the modern descendants of those plants could just spontaneously grow in their new climatic regions, but the sad truth is that the species will have to move something like 2,000 miles (3,000 kilometers) to go from where they are growing now to where they need to be growing during the high Altithermal. [...] In reality, few plants other than leptosporangiate ferns and some weeds are capable of migrating this fast on their own, and ferns can only pull it off because they reproduce via airborne spores that can survive in the stratosphere.

[...]

[Childs] spent two days hiking through the corn and identifying every life form he saw. He came up with about 25 species, including him and his uncomfortable traveling companion, the corn, a few deer tracks on the edge of the field, a few birds that flew overhead, over a dozen tiny invertebrates (spiders, an ant, a mite, and similar) and a few fungi. [...] That corn field [in Iowa] is full of food for a few weeks out of the year and a nutritional desert otherwise. [...] Just for comparison, the tallgrass prairie replaced by that corn field probably had over 1,000 species and was one of the champion ecosystems for sequestering carbon in the soil.

[...]

Ultimately, any species that survives has to pass through two great filters: peak humanity in this century, and the heat-up of the High Altithermal.

[...]

There's no reason to think that the High Altithermal won't cause shrinkage of many animals, and this will probably include humans. To provide a reference, the average US male and female, age 20-29, weighed 88.7 kg (195.5 lb) and 75.4 kg (166.2 lb) from 2007-2010. Yeah, we're fat. Shrink us 30% and the average American man and woman would weigh 62.09 kg (136.6 lb) and 52.8 kg (116.1 lb), or about what people now weigh on average in much of Asia. Shrink modern Asians by 30% and people start getting into the body range of modern pygmies, groups where the men are five feet tall and under.

State Prophecies and Barbarians by Design

Barbarian societies in rich environments can be in danger, for they are tempting targets for slaving raids, invasion, and conquest, because their riches can be exploited to feed a control system. Sometimes barbarians stay in resource-poor areas deliberately, simply to avoid this danger.

Many barbarians living near states actively adapt their cultures to become as useless as possible to states, following the example of the shrine oak in the Taoist classic Zhuangzi (Chuang-tzu), which grew ancient and enormous because every bit of it was perfectly useless to humans, except for the shade it cast. Barbarians within reach of states can do many things to be more useless. First and foremost, they can flee, especially into places like dense forests, mountains, deep deserts, swamps, and the like, where organized raiding is difficult and the terrain is the primary defense. They can adapt to moving, have few material possessions, live in small groups and simple settlements that are easy to abandon and rebuild, but hard to conquer and rule. They can adopt pastoral herding, for herds and especially horses can make it easy to outrun raiders. Slash-and-burn (swidden) agriculture is another good option, especially if they favor root crops like potatoes, yams, and cassava that are hard for the raiding soldiers to steal. Unlike a granary that can be rapidly emptied, a militia confiscating a potato field has to dig up every potato themselves. Barbarians can be not just multicultural but cultural shapeshifters, people who have family connections to many groups, some perhaps even civilized, who can pass as members of multiple groups at need, people who have multiple names and nicknames, multiple religions, multiple outward identities. Each of these adaptations serves two purposes: it allows people to adapt in often unpredictable environments, and it makes them as useless as possible to anyone who wants to systematize their lives, control them, and extract surplus resources from them.

[...]

Swiddening is labor-efficient, maximizing food production per hour worked, while something like paddy-rice is land-efficient, maximizing food produced per acre. There are good reasons to practice each one, but if we're talking about practices that minimize soil nutrient depletion, sequester carbon in the soil, and so forth, swiddening and practices like it appear to win.The key problem faced by civilized agriculture is that a lot of nutrients leave the farm to feed other people. Unless those nutrients come back in the form of composted garbage and night soil, civilized extractive agriculture degrades farmland. Worse, as civilizations grow, the people in charge generally try to get as much out of their farms as possible, so the farms are often run close to, or past, peak production.

Estranged Lands

The are four basic responses to a warming climate: moving to the coast, moving poleward, moving into the mountains, and sheltering in place on the rest of the globe.

[...]

On the coasts, the problem is the ever-encroaching sea, which doesn't just chew up land, it invades the groundwater first, making it impossible to grow salt intolerant plants long before it floods.

[...]

Survival in mountains depends on creating a network of farms, foragers, and herders at many elevations, and often the best network is based on kinship.

[...]

Absent a herd of ruminants to eat these inedible species and support herders with their milk, much High Altithermal vegetation will be challenging simply to survive in. The situation is analogous to parts of modern Papua New Guinea, where hunters often take food with them. No matter how skillful they are, there simply isn't enough human food in some Papuan forests for people to survive without gardening.

Hell Then High Water

There will be superficially "primitive foragers." They may wel be like the 1940s Sirionó tribe in eastern Bolivia, profiled by Allan Holmberg in his 1950 anthropology classic, Nomads of the Long Bow. Holmberg documented the lives of a tribe of about 150 people who had "no clothes, no domestic animals, little art, no design, no musical instruments, and no religion." Holmberg didn't even observe tools for making fire. A woman in each family carried coals between camps. He saw the Sirionó as timeless primitives, but later research found that they were the remnants of a group of about 3,000 people who'd been farmers, in contact with westerners since the 1690s. They'd had to abandon their homes and fields due to violence from cattle ranchers abetted by soldiers, along with epidemics of smallpox and influenza. Holmberg's "timeless primitives" were refugees, their culture shattered, making a meagre living while hiding on the edge of the Amazon rainforest. They lived atop a system of mounds and causeways that had supported an enigmatic society (their ancestors?) 1,000 years before.

[...]

In herd scattering, people transfer some of their animals to relatives' and friends' herds. The people herding animals they don't own may keep the milk the animals produce and possibly the offspring, but since animals are wealth (they store perishable vegetation as less-perishable live meat that can move under its own power), scattering animals among the allies' herds is a great way to make sure they're not all wiped out by disease or disaster.

[...]

The evidence suggests that the classic Maya civilization, a time when millions of people lived on the peninsula, collapsed during extended droughts, after they'd spent centuries adapting to drought. The problem was not just that they had hardened their demand for water, it was that, even with all the terraforming of the Yucatan peninsula, they were totally dependent on rain water, and could only store about an 18 month water supply.

The Earth Inhales

At the beginning of the Deep Altithermal, around 3,600 CE, humans will face what is, for the first time in 1,500 years, a strangely stable world. The Deep Altithermal still starts at [at] least 5°C (9°F) hotter than today's global average, so normal weather will include giant, slow-moving storms, cyclones any month of the year, black flag weather here and there for at least the first 11,000 years or so, and the other inconveniences of a hot Earth.

The Great Cycles

The idea of big climatic cycles may sound bizarre, but we're very privileged to live in a time of medium sunlight and high stability that has lasted about 5,000 years, and the last 12,000 years have actually been fairly calm. The last big swing happened about 12,000 years ago, when the last Ice Age ended. Truly large climatic swings won't start for about another 70,700 years.

Epochs of Empire and Fallow

The sunlight samba has a fairly regular beat to it. The climate swings back and forth with a period of about 9,200 years between peak and trough, and the peaks and troughs, when the climate is relatively constant, last about 2,000 years before reversing direction and heading the other way. [...] The period from around 3,000 BCE to the present is actually wonderfully flat, one of those long epochs where the isolation wobbles but doesn't change a lot. If you know anything about history, well, that's when we have history. [...] It's foolish to assume that something changed in our genes that enabled civilization to happen spontaneously across the globe. The rather better bet is that the climate stabilized long enough to enable civilization, with its centralized control systems that depend on predictable surpluses from farmers and herders, to exist in the first place.

A Flight of Drunken Swans

Normally, atmospheric particles are about 0.2 microns (µm). Pinatubo boosted this up to 0.5 µm. However, the critical value is 2.0 µm. Above that size, the particles act to trap heat in the atmosphere and warm it. Below that size, the particles scatter light back into space and cool the atmosphere.

[...]

At their worst, diseases might have climatic effects. [...] Some link the General Crisis of the 17th Century to the virgin ground plagues that hit the New World in the 16th Century. The idea is that the mass die-off of the New World peoples caused New World forests to massively expand. This sucked carbon out of the air, lowered the Earth's temperature, and caused the General Crisis in the next century, as well as arguably marking the beginning of the Anthropocene, the time when human activities affect the entire globe.

The Limits of Knowing

It's probably easier to think of the world of scientific disciplines as a global world of stateless tribes, most of which are small, with only a few to a few thousand people who share a specific scientific language, culture, and conventions. The language of each of these scientific subdisciplines can be as easily threatened as the language of an uncontacted forest tribe. It only takes a funding downturn, as happened in the US in the last decade, to drive people out of smaller fields and threaten the transmission of their fields' languages, cultures, and knowledge.

Of Guns, Bows, and Limited Resources

A few centuries ago in Europe, particularly in Britain and France, saltpeter deposits quickly became depleted as the kings' oft-despised "saltpeter-men" (or petermen, a term later applied to safecrackers) dug out saltpeter wherever they found it, even if they destroyed someone's outhouse, barn, or grave in the process. Still, mining saltpeter was insufficient to keep the guns fed, so they developed "saltpeter plantations." These were basically piles of manure watered with urine and kept out of the rain. There are a number of methods, but over the course of a year or two, you can get a few pounds of saltpeter per cubic yard of manure in a plantation. [...] The British Empire temporarily solved their saltpeter shortage when the British East India Company found that the mudflats at the mouth of the Ganges were the natural equivalents of saltpeter plantations. Ganges saltpeter was the Company's major trade item, easy to ship back to Britain because it retarded decay, including rot in the hulls of the wooden ships carrying it. So long as Britain controlled India, the British Empire could afford to feed a lot of guns and people. [...] Other countries were less lucky, forced to rely on things like saltpeter plantations and guano deposits all around the world. The 19th Century even saw "guano wars" over control of tiny islands that hosted seabird colonies. Much of this guano ended upon farmer's fields, but it also fed the guns. These struggles ended with the invention of artificial nitrogen fixation in the early 20th Century.

The Syms of Humanity

Artificial selection is fast, but it's not significantly faster than natural cases of rapid selection, like evolution of pesticide resistance in insects. The difference between artificial and natural selection appears to be the intensity of the selective pressures, and nature does occasionally create similarly intense pressures through change.

[...]

Some, like apples, never breed true, so controlling their reproduction involves cloning individuals that have desirable traits.

[...]

Only the [dogs] who crack our social codes will be able to parasitize us, take food and care form us, and they can only do that when we actively help them coevolve with us.

Multitrack History

If you think about Altithermal history as a piece of music, the fundamental beat is the passage of years, all 400,000 of them. They pass, one second per second, whatever happens. That's the metronome of time. Start here. History happens when it happens, and it takes as long as it needs to, no less and no more.

On top of that basic beat, lay the Milankovitch cycles. They are the result of the gravity of the Sun, Moon, Jupiter, and Saturn. There's nothing we can do to affect them, but they'll affect our history over the coming millennia. [...] On top of that, layer on the story of the terafart, how we will release greenhouse gases over the next 100 years, and how those gases are slowly absorbed, in stages, over the next 400,000 years. By itself, it's pretty easy to talk about how the terafart heats up the climate and how things cool down aain. However, the Milankovitch cycles also affect temperature regionally. Temperature changes around the Arctic and Antarctic circles control when the glaciers start reforming, and finally they blend with the concentration of atmospheric CO2 to determine when we get another ice age. [...] On top of the terafart and the Milankovitch cycles, add ice. During the High Altithermal and for probably 100,000 years thereafter, ice won't matter much. But once glaciers start forming, things get weird, because ice forming and melting takes a lot of energy. Ice accumulations put a hitch into the way Earth's climates follow the steady, slow beats of the Milankovitch cycle, making rapid change possible. [...] On top of all that, lay the cycles of vegetation and oceanic change. The shifting forest biomes, the masses of water in the global thermohaline circulation take centuries to move. They're sort of tracking the first two tracks, but they're also lagging by up to 500 years and being influenced by subsequent swings as they change. These lags add chaos to the climate. [...] On top of all that, lay the vibrant, busy back-and-forth of coevolution across the landscapes. [...] A world where civilization has collapsed, climate is abruptly changing, and there are few humans across large swathes of low diversity weed-lands, is very different than one that's had ten thousand years of relative stability for relationships to, quite literally, evolve, but the relationships are critical.

[...]

You might say that humans are prone to outbreaks when and where environmental conditions are right. We call these outbreaks civilization, and even without people using fossil fuels, such outbreaks will recur and will have major impacts on the world.

The Ice Age Double-Tap

Over the 100,000 year glacial cycle, basically there are 10,000 years when the Earth is so cold that even a Heinrich [Event] can't get the thermohaline circulation up to northern Europe. It's stuck in its coldest mode, and it's pretty stable. Then there are the interglacials or interstadials, like we're in now, when Hudson Bay isn't freezing solid, so Heinrich Events and Bond Cycles aren't possible. This climate is also stable. Then there's the rest of the time going from one to the other. During this time, apparently, the Bond Cycles, D-O Oscillation, and Heinrich Events happen, when climate jumps at least 5-10°C (10-20°F) rapidly and repeatedly.

How Long the Anthropocene?
In perhaps 5,000,000 years new coral reefs, or their equivalents, will start popping up in the tropics, as water chemistry returns to 20th Century conditions. This will be seen as a major environmental crisis by people who've lived for millions of years without coral reefs, as the reefs clog their harbors, render tropical shores impassable to ships, even raise the tops of submerged volcanos to the surface and above for the first time in millions of years.

[...]

We could attempt to dominate the planet, try to suppress eveything but our domestic species, rule tyrannically. We would then become the best host on the planet for pathogens and parasites, the next virgin, untapped frontier for whatever can evolve to take advantage of us.

[...]

If it's going to hurt either way, why not work towards a path of life for the future. [...] If you want a positive goal to live for, consider this: instead of thinking of life as a game where you win by dying with the most toys, I'd simply suggest playing life as an infinite game, where the point of the game isn't winning, but keeping the game going with as many players as possible. Those players aren't just your fellow humans. They include animals, plants, fungi, protists, bacteria, ideas, cities, landscapes, and cultures. All will eventually disappear, but you don't have to be the one to exterminate any of them.
14
4
Jordan Peacock's profile photoJeff Posey's profile photoEdward Morbius's profile photoChris Jones's profile photo
8 comments
 
+Jordan Peacock​, I was thinking more of the 1010 and binary.
Have him in circles
6,200 people
Eric Moore's profile photo
Chen Haitao's profile photo
Aniruddha Das's profile photo
Ashokraj Somu's profile photo
Robert Fulmer's profile photo
Samuel Sanchez's profile photo
Duy Tan Tran's profile photo
Fabrice MisterT's profile photo
Michele Gelli's profile photo

Jordan Peacock
moderator

What Are You Reading?  - 
 
I may have bitten off more than I can chew. 
2
Paulina Sanchez's profile photoBoris Borcic's profile photoJordan Peacock's profile photo
3 comments
 
Finished re-reading volume 1 of Knausgaard; I know Aaron's reading it as well. Love the last sentence:

"And death, which I have always regarded as the greatest dimension of life, dark, compelling, was no more than a pipe that springs a leak, a branch that cracks in the wind, a jacket that slips off a clothes hanger and falls to the floor."

Also, unless I missed it somewhere, he never yet reveals what his father changed his name to.
Add a comment...

Jordan Peacock
moderator

Discussion  - 
2
Jordan Peacock's profile photoAB Helton's profile photo
4 comments
 
It is a fantastic book. I'll finish it tonight, which is fortunate as it's due back tomorrow with no possibility of extension.
Add a comment...

Jordan Peacock

Shared publicly  - 
 
Some tunes for your Saturday
1

Jordan Peacock

Shared publicly  - 
 
Charles Stross on Space Opera cliches:

Don't worry about hitting the electrons bound to the neutral hydrogen either, gamma photons totally aren't a thing

[...]

Pay no attention to the native microbiota, they're harmless
... You won't even suffer from hay fever! Much less systemic anaphylaxis.

[...]

Ecosystems are robust; why not let your ship's cat stretch her legs whenever you land?
... This goes for your ship's rats, too

[...]

If you implant humans with the gene for chlorophyl they can magically become photosynthetic
... Okay, if you add the genes for RuBiSCO and the C3 pathway they can magically become photosynthetic
... Because of course two square meters of skin is enough surface area to photosynthetically capture enough energy for a high-metabolic-rate mammal to live off

[...]

The same kind of Money is accepted everywhere as payment for all debts

[...]

It is profitable to ship crude break-bulk cargo like timber or foodstuffs between star systems because starships are cheap and easy to repair and operate

[...]

Nobody has ever heard of end-user certificates or bonded cargo

[...]

If there are two or more ethnicities represented on a planet their collective politics are simple and easily understood by analogy to 20th century US race relations

[...]

... Pay no attention to the blank spots on the map
... And especially don't go looking for the unmarked mass graves

[...]

... Hijra? Hermaphrodites? Transgender? Asexual? What are those?

[...]

Spaceships are:
... bilaterally symmetrical
... rugged and able to survive impacts with other objects
... easily maintained by semi-skilled labour/shade tree mechanics
... about as complex as a 1920s tramp steamer, or maybe a deep-sea fishing trawler
... easily piloted
... can stop on a dime
... available second-hand in good working order from scrapyards
... have wings and an undercarriage, like a biplane
... You can hear them coming a parsec away

[...]

Nobody would ever think to run a starship up to 50% of light-speed and ram a planet

[...]

Radar gives us an instantaneously updated map of everything in a star system
... But stealth technology is totally a thing!

[...]

Laser beams are instantaneous, don't spread or disperse, and can melt anything
... Except a force field that somehow refracts/bends/absorbs the confused photons

[...]

Aliens communicate in language
... Using noises
... Emitted by their mouths
... At frequency ranges we can perceive

[...]

Aliens have religious beliefs because they have the same theory of mind as human beings and attribute intentionality to natural phenomena

http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-static/2016/03/towards-a-taxonomy-of-cliches-.html
5
1
Jordan's Collections
People
Have him in circles
6,200 people
Eric Moore's profile photo
Chen Haitao's profile photo
Aniruddha Das's profile photo
Ashokraj Somu's profile photo
Robert Fulmer's profile photo
Samuel Sanchez's profile photo
Duy Tan Tran's profile photo
Fabrice MisterT's profile photo
Michele Gelli's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Freelance Researcher, Consultant, Software Contractor
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Apps with Google+ Sign-in
  • Tessellate
  • Pocket Mortys
Story
Introduction
I like the stars. It's the illusion of permanence, I think. I mean, they're always flaring up and caving in and going out. But from here, I can pretend... I can pretend that things last. I can pretend that lives last longer than moments. Gods come, and gods go. Mortals flicker and flash and fade. Worlds don't last; and stars and galaxies are transient, fleeting things that twinkle like fireflies and vanish into cold and dust. But I can pretend.

                               Neil Gaiman "The Sandman"

I'm a metaphysical realist, posthumanist, autodidact, infovore.

I'm intellectually promiscuous, and love provocative engagements in good faith. I post regularly on topics that interest me, which include but are not limited to: political philosophy, world history, world news, philosophy of technology, political activism, cutting edge computer science, resilient community building and futurist scenario-building.

I am married, and we have two small children.

I blog regularly at hewhocutsdown.net.

Below are a few other quotes that capture well how I see the world:

"You are not an atheist if you deny what theists affirm. You are an atheist if you have no use for the concepts and doctrines of theism."

                         John Gray

"You cannot banish unreason simply by believing correct things."

                         Andreas Schou

When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes.

                               Erasmus

Democracy is...the action that constantly wrests the monopoly of public life from oligarchic governments, and the omnipotence over lives from the power of wealth. It is the power that, today more than ever, has to struggle against the confusion of these powers, rolled into one and the same law of domination.

                               Jacques Rancière, Hatred Of Democracy
                                        translated by Steve Corcoran

"Submitting oneself to labor discipline—supervision, control, even the self-control of the ambitious self-employed—does not make one a better person. In most really important ways, it probably makes one worse. To undergo it is a misfortune that at best is sometimes necessary. Yet it’s only when we reject the idea that such labor is virtuous in itself that we can start to ask what is virtuous about labor. To which the answer is obvious. Labor is virtuous if it helps others."

                               David Graeber

Changing our way of thinking about the world is a necessary first step, but it is by no means sufficient: we will need to destratify reality itself, and we must do so without the guarantee of a golden age ahead, knowing full well the dangers and possible restratifications we may face.

                               Manuel de Landa
                               "A Thousand Years Of Nonlinear History"

Anarchism, at least as I understand it, leaves posterity free to develop its own particular systems, in harmony with its needs. Our most vivid imagination cannot forsee the potentialities of a race set free from external restraints. How, then can anyone assume to map out a line of conduct for those to come? We, who pay dearly for every breath of fresh air, must guard against the tendency to fetter the future. If we succeed in clearing the soil from the rubbish of the past and the present, we will leave to posterity the greatest and safest heritage of all ages.

                               Emma Goldman

"The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far."

                               H.P. Lovecraft

"Let's plan for a future where we're all as stupid as we are today."

                         Andreas Schou

"Modern politics is a chapter in the history of religion."

                         
John Gray

"The debate between believers and atheists is confused. The real issue is not whether one should side with believers that assert the reality of the divine and supernatural, and the secular who assert only the reality of the material world or the naturalistic; rather, the debate is between logics of transcendence/sovereignty/patriarchy/state versus logics of immanence/anarchy. The issue of supernatural causation is a historically important issue given our current historical moment, but a sidebar to a much more fundamental issue. For my part, I am an a-theist, not an atheist."

                         Levi Bryant

Collections Jordan is following
View all
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Lakeville, MN
Previously
Norman Wells, Northwest Territories, Canada - Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Edmonton, Alberta, Canada - Mahboula, Kuwait - Adan, Kuwait - Hadiya, Kuwait - Sydney, New South Wales, Australia - Burnsville, Minnesota, U.S.A. - Lakeville, Minnesota, U.S.A.
Links
Other profiles
Contributor to
Jordan Peacock's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
5 Reasons Why Trump Will Win | MICHAEL MOORE
michaelmoore.com

This wretched, ignorant, dangerous part-time clown and full time sociopath is going to be our next president.

Pokemon Go players: you have 30 days from signup to opt out of binding a...
boingboing.net

Pokemon Go players: you have 30 days from signup to opt out of binding arbitration

Change the Police | Easily Distracted
blogs.swarthmore.edu

I often make an argument that we should be generous towards minor acts of professional misjudgment, particularly those caught on video, that

Being Relevant: Confronting the latest sacred
churchandpomo.typepad.com

by Rachel K. Ward The spectacle presents itself as a vast inaccessible reality that can never be questioned. Its sole message is: “What appe

The End Of A Republican Party
fivethirtyeight.com

Analysis and research by Harry Enten and David Nield. Legend has it that after leveling Carthage in the Third Punic War, Roman army generals

Fight Club 2 – a punch to the cerebral cortex
boingboing.net

Fight Club 2 – a punch to the cerebral cortex

Congress makes public long-secret 28 pages of 9/11 report that detail po...
boingboing.net

Congress makes public long-secret 28 pages of 9/11 report that detail possible Saudi link to Al Qaeda hijackers

Cash-Strapped Towns Are Un-Paving Roads They Can’t Afford to Fix | WIRED
www.wired.com

Rural areas all over the country are embracing this kind of strategic retreat.

Max Dovey visits “Luxury Communism” | WIRED
www.wired.com

*That’s quite a good event report. I don’t know this guy, but obviously he was there and paying close attention.This article has been reprod

The More the Merrier | Melting Asphalt
www.meltingasphalt.com

Lately I've been thinking a lot about (what I'm going to call) swarms and hives — two different kinds of collective animal behavior. Example

Normality from psychology to Lacan
ordinarymadnessblog.wordpress.com

The human sciences have provided a discourse of normal vs abnormal to discuss our inner worlds. This discourse has created a pathological ap

Pokemon Go Is Driving Insane Amounts of Sales at Small Local Businesses....
www.inc.com

For $1.19 an hour, you can have more customers than you've ever seen in your life

How the French Reread Proust
lithub.com

Dante in Italy, Cervantes in Spain, Shakespeare in England, Goethe in Germany—each is almost unanimously considered his country’s greatest w

Dallas Mayor Calls Bullsh*t On Open Carry: It Didn’t Help During Shootin...
www.ifyouonlynews.com

Open Carry had an opportunity to justify its existence - and it failed on every conceivable level.

I Built Noah's $100 Million Ark
www.fastcodesign.com

The architects behind a 500-foot timber arkthe centerpiece of a new Kentucky theme parkspoke to Co.Design about building it.

Just Gaming
larvalsubjects.wordpress.com

Let’s play a game. You give me a number and I’ll give you another in response. We start. You say 7, I respond with 9. You say 132, and I res

From The Ashes Of Bernie Sanders’ Campaign Rises An Army Of Candidates
thinkprogress.org

Meet the young progressives who have vowed to take Sanders' political revolution local.

A game of consequences - Charlie's Diary
www.antipope.org

There's an old saying that only two things are unavoidable: death and taxes. I think this is wrong—the two unavoidable things are politics,