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This is Morris Sadek, a conservative (read extremist) Coptic Christian who promoted the recent anti-Islamic film and lied about an Israeli being the creator.   He runs a small group called the National American Coptic Assembly.

"The violence that it caused in Egypt is further evidence of how violent the religion and people are and it is evidence that everything in the film is factual," Mr. Sadek said in a telephone interview from his Washington home.

http://nacopts1.blogspot.ca/2010/10/message-from-morris-sadek.html

Here is an Arabic video of him from October 2010:
Message from Morris Sadek .avi

I have no clue what he is saying in the video.   However, he is known to be an Egyptian-American anti-Muslim activist, so you can imagine it's anti-Muslim. 

His crappy website:
http://www.nationalamericancopticassembly.webs.com/

An article by Mr. Saddek from 2008:
http://www.nowpublic.com/world/woman-stoned-death-adultery-after-islamic-somali-court-ruling-

It seems he lives in Chantilly, Virginia.  Probably a self-description:

morris sadek Mr. Morris Sadik is one of Egypt's leading human rights advocates. He is President of the Egyptian Center of Human Rights for National Unity in Cairo. president of national American coptic assembly , usa , In October 1999, he became Advocates' Counsel for Middle East Affairs with a special focus on Egypt, as well as a director of our International Institute for Law. He is a fearless scholar and a recognized expert in constitutional and human rights law. Working as a team, Morris and Nagi have already scored a major victory this October when they joined forces to defend Adly Shakir, a Christian sentenced to death for a crime he did not commit. As a result of Morris's advocacy before the Supreme Court in Egypt and Nagi's networking in Washington on Capitol Hill and among the diplomatic community, Mr. Shakir's death sentence was reversed. But the battle for Mr. Shakir's life is not over. A new trial is set for January. In addition, Nagi and Morris are working on the infamous Al-Kosheh incident, in which 1,200 Christians were tortured. Advocates International

Other articles (83 total):
http://www.nowpublic.com/morris-sadek-0

His blog?  Promoting the film on Sep 5 & 10, 2012:
http://nacopticas1.blogspot.ca/

Nakoula:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/109667384864782087641/posts/1Tb4Bp1PH35
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Laura Novakovics's profile photoIrina Tcherednichenko's profile photoGus K's profile photoJonathan Langdale's profile photo
31 comments
 
Oh, shit. The consequences of this video being made by a Copt could be very bad -- there's a real risk of interethnic violence in Egypt right now. 
 
I know it is not religion's fault but this proves yet again, the kind of people likely to be very religious are also very bad people.
 
He's an extremist Coptic.  The Coptics are saying this guy is fringe, apparently. 
 
An Egyptian state website carried a statement by Egypt’s Coptic Orthodox church condemning what it said were moves by some Christian Copts living abroad “to finance the production of a film insulting Prophet Mohammad.”

Medhat Klada, a representative of Coptic Christian organizations in Europe, said Sadek’s views are not representative of expatriate Copts.

“He is an extremist … We don’t go down this road. He has incited the people (in Egypt) against Copts,” he said, speaking from Switzerland. “We refuse any attacks on religions because of a moral position.”
 
+Laura Novakovics I think there might be extremists no matter what.  But it's hard to deny how easy religion makes it.  Would string theorists resort to violence in the name of abstract theory? That's hard to see happening. 
 
Unfortunately :<  One can't help but think there is a conspiracy actually going on with this one, but that could just be my tinfoil hat being too tight. 
 
I am an Egyptian, and there are actually a wave of anger for our prophet Muahmmed (Peace Be Upon Him) being insulted. However, we know that such an action is carried by an extremist.
 Both the Egyptian Azhar and Church condemned this.
 We know that the making of this film has no relation to Christians who live in or outside Egypt other than those extremists and  we are aware that true Christians, as well as we the Muslims, respect all other religions and believes. 
 
+Moustafa Alzantot I only hope that the Muslims of Egypt all understand this as well as you do, and that nobody tries to use this as an excuse to create violence for their own advantage.
 
+Moustafa Alzantot I understand being angry at people distorting who people might be or what they might think.  I sorta get lost when it turns into such hatred.  

When some crazy theist makes a negative video on Youtube about atheists, I don't hate them for it.  I think it's silly and I sorta pity them. 

Just as much as inciting anger is a bad thing, freedom of speech should win out.  There is no excuse for so much hatred over a video.  The truth seems to be that those who are angered want more people to get angry by seeing the video, as opposed to silencing it.  

The protests are only making it worse, not better.  This will ultimately mean more people will end up freely insulting Islam.  This is going to end up fortifying free speech.  A concept not unrelated to the Arab Spring revolution that lead to the various overthrows of Dictators that limited it.  
 
That there are more and more Muslim's holding signs and speaking out against violence and promoting common sense is pretty cool.  I think maybe it was more Libyans than anything, not sure. 
Gus K
 
I thought we had the God-given right to mock religion in America. 
 
An article by Mr. Saddek from 2008:
http://www.nowpublic.com/world/woman-stoned-death-adultery-after-islamic-somali-court-ruling-

It seems he lives in Chantilly, Virginia.  Probably a self-description:

morris sadek Mr. Morris Sadik is one of Egypt's leading human rights advocates. He is President of the Egyptian Center of Human Rights for National Unity in Cairo. president of national American coptic assembly , usa , In October 1999, he became Advocates' Counsel for Middle East Affairs with a special focus on Egypt, as well as a director of our International Institute for Law. He is a fearless scholar and a recognized expert in constitutional and human rights law. Working as a team, Morris and Nagi have already scored a major victory this October when they joined forces to defend Adly Shakir, a Christian sentenced to death for a crime he did not commit. As a result of Morris's advocacy before the Supreme Court in Egypt and Nagi's networking in Washington on Capitol Hill and among the diplomatic community, Mr. Shakir's death sentence was reversed. But the battle for Mr. Shakir's life is not over. A new trial is set for January. In addition, Nagi and Morris are working on the infamous Al-Kosheh incident, in which 1,200 Christians were tortured. Advocates International

Other articles:
http://www.nowpublic.com/morris-sadek-0
 
From the biography of our prophet "Muhammad" (Peace Be Upon Him), we learn how to forgive and respond to offense in a good way. Through his life, he was treated hardly from people in his home town who where all heathens as he started to ask them to worship "Allah" the only one God. He and his fellows were forced to get out of their town and many of them were tortured and murdered. However, when he had power and came back to his home town he forgived them and didn't do anything bad in contrast to how they used to deal with him and his fellows. One things we are asked to learn from him is mercy.

As a liberal Muslim, I don't find any contradiction between free speech and loving my prophet. I think the right way to deal with such video is by ignoring it and spreading the truth about our prophet.
 
However, it is so hard to accept that some person whom you admire and love the most is being insulted in this way.
 

“If a man like Muhamed were to assume the dictatorship of the modern world, he would succeed in solving its problems that would bring it the much needed peace and happiness."

George Bernard Shaw
 
The problem is that the scriptures can be interpreted however anyone wishes.  There's a lot of questionable stuff from my own reading of the Koran/Quran including the context of the more violent passages.  And nobody really knows what the original intentions were.  It would be better to admit to redefining them for modern times and evolving than to say everyone must remain static in a single view that is better than another questionable interpretation, or that modern scholars can actually know original intentions with any authority.   It would be better to admit that there were a range of intentions and ideas then as there is now.  There was bad and good.   Trying to deny the bad stuff is useless because it's obvious.  The Churches will always lose this argument when people seriously consider it.

To deny that we living a dynamic system seems futile.  

Like I said, I understand being insulted because in a way it's also a personal insult for holding a specific view.  But I don't understand the hatred that stems from the insult.  People can insult me all day and talk about my mother, or that they think I have mo morals.  It's only when they actually do something to me that changes my life when I might go down that road and hate someone.  There's only about one person in my life that I can say I ever really hated. 

Whatever happened to, "I'm rubber and you're glue, what bounces off me sticks to you?" That's what we used to say as kids. 
 
+Moustafa Alzantot That is an argument for a dictatorship.  There are those that argue that Sadam Hussein was able to maintain more peace than without him.  If you're a dictator, you have a lot of leeway to tell people what to do and what not to do because the alternative is death.  That doesn't sound very peaceful. 
 
+Jonathan Langdale  the reaction to insult differs from body to another and also according to how much you love the person insluted. For me, as I mentioned before, I am not in favor in bringing fame to those extremists behind such movie.

About the quote: this is not in favor of dictatorship in any sense, this is quoted from Geroge Bernad Shaw who was showing his admiration about Muhammad PBUH. 
More than 1500 years ago, Muhammad showed us a democratic basis for management and decision making stating based on consultancy.

" conduct their affairs by mutual consultation"  Holly Quran (As Shura: 38)
 
Mahatma Gandhi, speaking on the character of Muhammad, says in (Young India): 
"I wanted to know the best of one who holds today's undisputed sway over the hearts of millions of mankind....I became more than convinced that it was not the sword that won a place for Islam in those days in the scheme of life. It was the rigid simplicity,the utter self-effacement of the Prophet, the scrupulous regard for his pledges, his intense devotion to his friends and followers, his intrepidity, his fearlessness, his absolute trust in God and in his own mission. These and not the sword carried everything before them and surmounted every obstacle. When I closed the 2nd volume (of the Prophet's biography), I was sorry there was not more for me to read of the great life." 
Gus K
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If only the cultural heritage of Muslims wasn't considered near equal to their religion. It's like Greek Christians who support their Church as a matter of Greek heritage, but never really know what the religion is about. They end up using it simply as a way to express Greek solidarity, not solidarity with God and Man. In the same way, many Muslims use Islam as just a way to preserve their cultural heritage... to honor grandma and grandpa... which means their culture cannot evolve very easily because it's pretty much set in stone... even the Stone Age.
 
Sorry +Gus K , I don't think this is right. I don't know much about the Greet Christians and how they use their religion. But for us, Islam is intended to be a life style that governs every aspect in our life to maintain a strong and good relation between person and his creator "Allah.

In Islam, prayers and traditions are meant to be done for Allah..

For example, we we do "Salat" Prayers five times, this is done as a time for connecting between the human and his creator, because in Salat you talk to Allah and can ask him to help you.

Another corner stone in Islam is Zakat, that is a percent of the rich men money that should be payed for the poor and orphans annually,  We a person do the Zakat, he do it because "Allah" the creator asked him to do so to purify his money. So you give away your money for the sake of Allah the creator.
 
+Moustafa Alzantot The idea that humans do things for an imaginary God and not other people, often sacrificing other real people, seems to be part of the problem.

Doing things for any deity you have faith in which causes another person physical harm or limits their liberty is plain wrong.  

Don't do things for Allah, do things the for the woman and children that suffer in the name of whatever God that probably doesn't exist. 

If you want to have faith then call it faith.  I don't like it when people want to call faith truth.  Treat it for what it is. 

The only thing that truly creates life are women.  That is a truth.  The rest is faith.
 
This a bit controversial...

We don't believe that we are doing things for an imaginary God... but our God is real, he is present every where, you can not see or hear him but you can see his creations..

If there is something created, there must be a creator..
and we we worship the creator of everything.. sky...land.. and us, humans (men and women).

Our God do ask them to do only good deeds, it prohibits any action that is considered harmful for your self or for the others.

Women are just like men they are both humans and they are created not creators..
 
The keyword is believe.  That's faith.  There is a difference between faith and doing something because you see someone hurt on the ground.  There's a difference.  It's not appropriate to say they're the same thing.  You can believe they are, but don't say it's universally true for everyone as if it's something that should be taken as truth when it is restricted to the realm for faith. 

You've never seen Allah and you never never personally been told by him what is claimed to be known.  You are restricted to saying things like "we believe" or "we don't believe.'  It cannot be said, "This is so."  You must always qualify it in terms of faith. 

Treating faith like anything other than it is, is a delusion in itself. 
 
I don't agree with your point of view that faith = delusion..
But rather, I think faith is a merit .. 

If you look around and contemplate the universe, you will find everything strengthen your faith..


"Indeed, Allah orders justice and good conduct and giving to relatives and forbids immorality and bad conduct and oppression. He admonishes you that perhaps you will be reminded."  (Holly Quran: Al-Nahhl 90)

So Allah orders only to do justice and good conducts...
 
+Moustafa Alzantot I didn't say that faith == delusion.  I said calling faith == truth is a delusion (in itself).  The argument that faith is a delusion is a separate issue, which I happen to think is also true.  There is a difference.  A person of faith will obviously not agree with faith being a delusion.  But a person of faith should be able to recognize the difference between the knowable through direct exposure and the unknowable assumptions which are derived from faith.  This is the very essence and definition of faith. 

However, whereas I think faith is a delusion, I also think all of consciousness is a delusion.   There is no free will and I think this is provable.  Ignoring facts doesn't make them less true.  It's no different than trying to say you continue to believe the world is flat even though we've proven isn't a sphere.  This is a delusion.

If you disagree, then you're basically saying there are no delusions. 
 
Well, factual things are not only things that can be seen, heared or touched.

Faith is required to supplement our senses and understanding.. 
 
+Moustafa Alzantot 
You may find the following read on the Bernard Shaw's quote interesting. And I'm pointing it to you to because quotes fly and fly over the Internet and more than frequently they are picked based on personal preferences.

http://idlethink.wordpress.com/2008/12/03/being-an-unforgivably-protracted-debunking-of-george-bernard-shaws-views-of-islam/

I'm not to debate how people live their lives, everybody is free to choose what suits them best. There are so many religions and spiritual beliefs in the world that we better learn about religious tolerance as fast as we can ....From what I read you would have no problem to agree with the "tolerance" part.  
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_religions_and_spiritual_traditions


 
Gus K
 
+Moustafa Alzantot My point was that humans are humans and some religious people are sincere, but most people are not mystically-minded and simply follow whatever their parents or culture believes because it wouldn't be very convenient to choose a religion that everyone around you disagrees with. For example, can you imagine a Muslims converting to Christianity and what their parents would do? For many, whatever their religion, they follow their religion because they can't imagine being disowned by their family and local community. 

I'm not discounting people with genuine faith in God... I'm claiming that most people are not free-will believers in whatever god they follow. Most simply follow what their family follows. You can't really blame them. We've all adopted personal aspects from our parents and other influential people in our past.

So, little Muslim kids grow up to be big Muslims, not because they received a personal revelation from Gabriel or anything mystical, but because that's how they were trained from childhood. It's just the way it is and it goes for all cultures and subcultures, including those who mock religion. If mom and dad mock religion, the kids will probably grow up to mock religion... or if your peer group tends to downplay religion, to be part of the group, you will likely adopt the same attitude if you want to enjoy the benefits of the group. On and on. 

I don't doubt that you love your religion. Props to you for your personal sense of loyalty.
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