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Jon Lawhead
Works at University of Southern California
Attends University of Southern California
Lives in Los Angeles, CA
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Jon Lawhead

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Gregg Gies's profile photoValdis Klētnieks's profile photoMike DiMuzio's profile photoJames Britt's profile photo
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I'm puzzled how one can be Secretary of Sate and never receive classified information in official email, or know in advance that it would never happen. How was classified information exchanged?
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Jon Lawhead

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"Morphine spread through my body in relaxing waves. 'Was that alright?' asked Ike, smiling. 'If God made anything better, he kept it for himself.'"
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Casually buried in the middle of this:

"Clinton's favorability is 39/54, and Trump is even worse off at 35/58. This has given rise to the 'Giant Meteor for President' movement, and we find that the Meteor would poll at 13%- far more support than the third party candidates actually on the ballot- with Clinton at 43% and Trump at 38%. The Meteor is particularly appealing to independent voters, functionally in a three way tie at 27% to 35% for Clinton and 31% for Trump." (emphasis added)

This is the year nihilism finally goes mainstream.
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"Although Capitol Hill and the campaign trail are miles apart, the breakdown in order in both places reflects the underlying reality that there no longer is any such thing as a party leader. There are only individual actors, pursuing their own political interests and ideological missions willy-nilly, like excited gas molecules in an overheated balloon. [...]

Trump, however, didn’t cause the chaos. The chaos caused Trump. What we are seeing is not a temporary spasm of chaos but a chaos syndrome.

Chaos syndrome is a chronic decline in the political system’s capacity for self-organization."
Republicans and Democrats of 2016 have neither intelligible boundaries nor enforceable norms. As a result, renegade political behavior pays.
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Tom Nathe's profile photoTim Wesson's profile photo
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Having read the article, there is one observation missing, which is that the population at large are less radical than these interest groups.

A very different kind of solution might work better both with the anti-establishment narrative, and with the need to restore coalitions, and that is a change to the electoral system.  A form of proportional representation which does not hand powers to parties to select ideologically correct lists might fit the bill.  Having several small parties in Congress and the Senate forces trade-offs, and neuters extremists.

Regarding practicalities, Condorcet would be mathematically ideal, but fails in that you need passing familiarity with graph theory to understand its mechanisms.  Single Transferable Vote, however, is relatively easy to grasp:  we all know what to do, and we all know someone who does understand how it works.  It also has the advantage of inducing a strong representation of the people, since any sitting candidate can lose their seat through a simple reordering of preferences without the voter having to be 'disloyal' to their preferred party.
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Jon Lawhead

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Want to learn about the math and science of dynamical systems theory this summer? Join in!
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Jon Lawhead
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Administration and logistics  - 
 
Welcome to the summer study group on dynamical systems theory and philosophy!

This group is aimed at philosophers (and other interested non-specialists) who want to learn more about the mathematics and science of dynamical systems, with a particular eye toward applying the concepts from that field to contemporary problems in philosophy. We'll cover the basics of most of the mathematics necessary to understand what dynamical systems theory is all about, and to understand how it contributes to our understanding of the world.

The group will consist of both independent reading/work and joint discussions on the material, as well as on the implications of the material to contemporary philosophy (especially philosophy of science). The group discussions will take place here on Google's "Hangouts On Air," and so will be archived and available on YouTube after the fact. Anyone who wants to participate at any level is welcome. Feel free to follow along closely and participate in the group discussions, or merely watch the hangouts after the fact (or anything in between). No specific background is necessary, though a familiarity with algebra and geometry will make things much easier for you.

We'll be starting with a review of the basics of single and multivariable calculus (probably drawing heavily on Khan Academy's stuff on that), and then move on to work through Stephen Strogratz' book excellent book Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos (https://www.amazon.com/Nonlinear-Dynamics-Chaos-Applications-Nonlinearity/dp/0738204536), possibly supplemented with other things.

The discussions will run weekly or semi-weekly, but this group will be a constant resource for people who prefer to participate asynchronously. Feel free to post discussion threads, questions, or reflections on the material (and related issues). I'll do my best to answer any questions that come up, and hopefully others will participate as well. Both the main participants (myself and +Kyle Broom ) are philosophers by training (i.e. we have PhDs in the subject), but I'm hopeful that people with different backgrounds will join in as well.

The focus here will be on conceptual rather than computational understanding, so rather than working on problem sets and the like, we'll emphasize getting a good intuitive understanding of the mathematics--enough to understand the field--and then considering some of the more "philosophical" (or foundational) issues the mathematics and science raises.

More material will be forthcoming soon (including a schedule, hopefully). In the meantime, feel free to invite other people whom you think may be interested, and post an introduction about yourself in the "Introductions" category so we can get a feel for what everyone's background and interests are.
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Great group - looking forward to the discussion - my interest in systems theory is in connection to synthetic biology - ref the introduction to my review about biological computer http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S200103701460026X
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Jon Lawhead

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"This case does not exist in isolation. It exists in a political climate where secrecy is regarded as the highest end, where people have their lives destroyed for the most trivial – or, worse, the most well-intentioned – violations of secrecy laws, even in the absence of any evidence of harm or malignant intent... In 2011, Army Private Chelsea Manning was charged with multiple felonies and faced decades in prison for leaking documents that she firmly believed the public had the right to see; unlike the documents Clinton recklessly mishandled, none of those was Top Secret.

[...]

Like the Wall Street tycoons whose systemic fraud triggered the 2008 global financial crisis, and like the military and political officials who instituted a worldwide regime of torture, Hillary Clinton is too important to be treated the same as everyone else under the law.

[...]

But a system that accords treatment based on who someone is, rather than what they’ve done, is the opposite of one conducted under the rule of law. It is, instead, one of systemic privilege.

[...]

[Clinton] recklessly handled Top Secret information, engaged in conduct prohibited by law, and lied about it repeatedly to the public. But she won’t be prosecuted or imprisoned for any of that, so Democrats are celebrating. But if there is to be anything positive that can come from this lowly affair, perhaps Democrats might start demanding the same reasonable leniency and prosecutorial restraint for everyone else who isn’t Hillary Clinton."
Perhaps Democrats might start demanding the same leniency and prosecutorial restraint for everyone who isn't Hillary Clinton.
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Mike DiMuzio's profile photoJon Lawhead's profile photo
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+Mike DiMuzio Yeah, agreed. I don't think she should go to jail; I just think Manning and Snowden shouldn't either. 
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Jon Lawhead
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*Plenary Meeting July 1*

Hey everyone, we're planning to have an initial hangout meeting tomorrow, July 1, to discuss scheduling and planning for the group. We're shooting for some time in the evening (likely between 8 and 9 PM) Pacific time. Please join in if you can! I'll get an exact time up tomorrow once I have one.
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Daniel Estrada's profile photoAlex Norman's profile photo
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Any movement?
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+Alexandra Spector, +Jon Lawhead and I went on a hike last night in the Hollywood Hills. Nearly 750' of elevation in 3/4 mile. Steep enough to be quite dangerous at night, so definitely fun. The tree at the top was the only one to survive a 2007 wildfire that burned through 817 acres in and around Griffith Park. People left notes between the stones of a small village of cairns in the area around the tree. Somewhat invasively to their authors, we are sharing a selection of them with you. #Goldilocks

http://www.welikela.com/los-angeles-wisdom-tree/


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Jon Lawhead
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Want to learn about the math and science of dynamical systems theory this summer? Join in!
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Jon Lawhead
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Introductions  - 
 
I'm a philosopher of science interested primarily in the philosophical foundations of the natural sciences, particularly the complex systems sciences and climate science. I completed my PhD in philosophy in 2014, under Philip Kitcher at Columbia University. My doctoral work analyzed climate science from the perspective of complex systems theory, and discussed the role that computer simulations play in climate prediction. I am currently a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Southern California, working on interdisciplinary problems in philosophy of science and climate science.

My interests and background are strongest in the foundations of climate science and related problems, but I also have a strong base of knowledge in complexity theory and dynamical systems more generally, as well as in the foundations of computational modeling in the natural sciences. My research centers on the novel problems posed by modeling complex natural systems, including structural model error and the interplay between pragmatic value judgements and the construction of objective formal models, as well as more general foundational questions about the nature of self-organization and emergence in complex adaptive systems. I have also done work at the intersection of complexity theory and the philosophy of biology, engaging with questions about self-organized complexity and function in biological systems, and drawing a contrast with synthetically engineered systems of similar organizational structure.
I also have strong interests in the philosophy of technology, information theory, network theory, and the foundations of quantum mechanics.

I'll be leading the reading group, at least nominally, though I hope other people with different areas of expertise will contribute just as much as I do.
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This actually looks extremely fun. 
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I wonder what score they might have given  Sheldrake for a screed on  "morphogenetic resonance" ?
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People
Have him in circles
8,919 people
Brian Hannah's profile photo
Andrew Watkins's profile photo
Adrian Grigore's profile photo
Matias Manguene's profile photo
Kleine Hassler's profile photo
carton hd's profile photo
Aiden Davis's profile photo
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Education
  • University of Southern California
    Postdoctoral research, 2014 - present
    Foundations of climate modeling and geoengineering.
  • Columbia University
    PhD, 2014
    Philosophy
  • Columbia University
    MPhil, 2012
    Philosophy
  • UC Berkeley
    BA, 2003 - 2007
    Philosophy
  • Columbia University
    MA, 2010
    Philosophy
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Single
Other names
Reality Apologist, Cyber Samurai, Dr. Dilettante, Entheogenic
Story
Tagline
"I'm not an expert on anything, but I can improvise."
Introduction
I completed my PhD in philosophy at Columbia University in the spring of 2014, and I'm now a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Southern California, with a joint appointment in the philosophy and earth science departments.  I'm interested in the foundations of complexity theory, the philosophy of climate science, general philosophy of science, naturalism (broadly construed), and the philosophy of technology. My work has been primarily influenced by Philip Kitcher, Julien Emile-Geay, John Searle, David Albert, Yaneer Bar-Yam, and Daniel Dennett.

My research focuses on the emergence of complex behavior in deterministic dynamical systems. My dissertation explored issues in modeling the global climate, highlighting the differences—both methodological and conceptual—that scientists must confront in the move from modeling simple systems to modeling complex systems.  I'm currently working on projects centered on the foundations of climate modeling and the evaluation of geoengineering.
Bragging rights
Ta'veren Ka-mai
Work
Occupation
"I'm not an expert on anything, but I can improvise."
Skills
Fabulous luck
Employment
  • University of Southern California
    Postdoctoral scholar, present
    Postdoctoral researcher in sustainability studies. I'm building an interdisciplinary project between the earth sciences department and the philosophy department. My research focuses on the mathematical signatures associated with impending catastrophic "tipping points" in complex physical systems, and the application of that work to the evaluation of geoengineering proposals.
  • Interdisciplined
    Founding Board Member, 2013 - present
    Developing the first-ever Google Glass massively multiplayer augmented reality game: Swarm!
  • Columbia University
    Philosopher's apprentice, 2014
    "The sciences, each straining in its own direction, have hitherto harmed us little; but some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the light into the peace and safety of a new dark age." -H.P. Lovecraft
  • The Cooper Union
    Adjunct Professor, 2012 - 2013
    I taught the first-ever courses in philosophy of science and philosophy of technology at one of the world's foremost science and technology colleges. Also, I agitated for revolution.
  • UC Berkeley
  • BN.com
  • Johns Hopkins University
  • Columbia University
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Los Angeles, CA
Previously
New York City - Black Rock City, NV - Reno, NV - Reno, NV - Berkeley, CA - New York, NY - Las Vegas, NV - Brooklyn, NY