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Jon Lamoreaux
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THE REVENANT

This could be Leonardo DiCaprio’s year at the 2016 Oscars, though he should have won it for What’s Eating Gilbert Grape (1993), and maybe for The Wolf of Wall Street (2013). Either way, The Oscars can be cold to true talent as we all know, and so can this pre-Civil War wilderness revenge film from Oscar winning director Alejandro Inarritu.

The Story: Hugh Glass (DiCaprio) is a hired hand in 1922 mid-west America, along with several other men, for the Rocky Mountain Fur Company led by Captain Andrew Henry (Dohmnall Gleeson). When Glass, who leads the group with his exceptional tracking skills, is attacked by a bear and nearly dies, it takes the entire group to gurney him back to base. The inclement weather, treacherous terrain and French settlers and their scalp-ripping partners from the Arikara Native American tribe, along with strong dissent from crew member Fitzgerald (Tom Hardy), make it exceptionally difficult for Glass who finds he needs to survive and heal himself in order to exact revenge on a deceitful, murderous Fitzgerald.

The Goods: That bear attack, the one Jonah Hill appeared as at this year’s Golden Globes, and the bear everyone who sees this film seems to be discussing, is genius, in the sense it is definitely without a doubt all computer animated. The scene looks, feels and sounds as real as anything you might suspect could happen when a strange man happens upon a Grizzly’s cubs, which Glass does by accident. The fur, the voice, the breath of the animal is all created from computers and their artists and the movie magic is sick, as the kids say. Sick. It’s real, though it’s not real, and the scene which covers the entire attack, is recorded as if it’s all one take, one long recorded shot–as most cell phone videos are one take–captured in nature by Oscar winning cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki and Industrial Light & Magic CGI team comprised of nominees Rich McBride, Matthew Shumway, Jason Smith and Cameron Waldbauer. That’s two more Oscars there, for Cinematography and Visual Effects, and it should be noted this will be a hat trick for Lubezki who won for Gravity in 2013 and Birdman in 2014. An amazing feat in itself.

The other part of The Revenant’s magic is that Inarritu loves these long takes (what seems like long takes as cheated in Birdman, which was seemingly one long shot the entire film). That style of letting the camera capture and not interrupt the action seals the film in this realm of surreal realism, surreal because we are there in the cold, winter, icy mountains or forest or riverside watching the action unfold like a documentary. The limitation on cuts and edits keeps the film as seemingly pure as possible. And Lubezki filmed all this without lights, without the normal studio grip, electric and gaffing support the camera department requires. What the camera records then is even more pure and real and that natural lighting is stunning. I mean, it makes sense to film it this way due to the harsh conditions. But it doesn’t look like crap. The film celluloid, not digital video, sucks it in and renders it all crystal clear with sharp blacks and contrast. There is nothing muddy or grainy about any lack of light the situation may have presented. Instead, the photography will win an Oscar.

One thing you’ll notice is the eyes of characters, like Fitzgerald and Glass, glow and glisten with the natural reflection of light bouncing off of the snow and frozen tundra. It captures extra intensity in the characters and gives them superhuman traits of sort, the kind of subliminal aura an extra’s zombie eye contacts can do for a horror film. At times it’s as if you can see into their souls, and some, like Fitzgerald, seem soulless.

Hardy, too, needs an Oscar for this role. He exudes country frontiersman, self serving, wild and conniving, where the yellow of cowardice is disguised by the strength of confidence behind knives and guns, and the language of dumb men taught by the dumb, Neanderthal men before them. Hardy’s Fitzgerald tells a story about his father and how he came to learn reason from his father’s atheistic discovery of God. The telling is so enriched, and matter of fact, coming on the heals of steely killings that you might think Fitzgerald himself has discovered the secrets of survival. He has actually, but his secrets are gothic, campfire scary, and just as American as the ones learned by Glass.

And let us not forget that we need to include an actor’s interaction with CGI objects and characters today when we consider their performances which, in addition to the extraordinary survival mechanics and real life events DiCaprio endured to make this film, he also leads us to really believe he is mauled by a bear.

The Flaws: My problem with the film however is it’s all too familiar, having grown up seeing and being fascinated by survival and Native American relations in Jeremiah Johnson (1972) and The Mountain Men (1980) amongst other, long man-vs-nature films. I don’t think it’s enough to showcase America in all its natural, wild glory, in terms of exploring and settling the West; the majesty of flowing rivers against pastel winter sunsets and golden reeds against the shoreline, contrasted with the violence of men trampling over men to take what they want, to divide and conquer and to massacre, red blood on white snow, when its been done in countless movies.

What is it that sets The Revenant apart from other films? Is it only that it’s DiCaprio cutting open a horse in a snow storm and finding warmth inside its dead cavity? Or is it the spectacle of seeing his character attacked by a bear? Or, like in a Charles Bronson film from the ‘70’s and '80’s, is it revenge in what is ultimately a revenge film? To me none of that warrants “best picture,” and if it weren’t for the director and cinematographer I doubt I would actively seek out and watch this film. Because it certainly is not entertaining outside of these spectacles–the greatest of which, again, is the fantastic capturing of sun, light and nature in America’s wintery heartland.

And ultimately, what really saddens me about all of this, is the undoing of all that hard work by these talented people in the single handed choice to end the film in the way Inarritu does. The last shot, which I can only equate to the Native American crying on the side of the road in that famous anti-pollution ad from the '70’s, destroys this nearly three hour film in a matter of seconds.

The Call: I say the big screen has the advantage here and you owe it to the crew, and yourself, to see The Revenant on the biggest screen you can. But other than for photography, I’d say stow the dough. Stay inside, keep yourself warm.

Rated R for strong frontier combat and violence including gory images, a sexual assault, language and brief nudity. Running time is 2 hour and 36 minutes.
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SPECTRE

The 24th Bond film, and the fourth for Daniel Craig, introduces the British spy to the franchise’s oldest and most familiar villain.

The Story: James Bond has a new boss—M, played by Ralph Fiennes—and the whole double-o program is on the verge of being replaced by a mega-surveillance platform. As M says to his MI5 counterpart, C, played by Andrew Scott, “You’re George Orwell’s worst nightmare.” Indeed Big Brother watches all but somehow Bond manages to go rogue and follow up on a mysterious tip from the past that leads him to SPECTRE—a group of global pimps, thieves and wise guys, hence the acronym, Special Executive for Counter-Intelligence, Terrorism, Revenge and Extortion. SPECTRE is led by what will eventually become (if we’re still thinking of the Daniel Craig Bond films as prequels) Bond’s biggest nemesis, one Ernst Stavo Blofeld, played here by Oscar winner Christoph Waltz. This marks Blofeld’s seventh Bond appearance, making this 007 episode a sort of origins story for the bad guy.

The Goods: Let me throw one more set of numbers out there: this is the second Bond film for Sam Mendes who has directed two of my favorite films, American Beauty (1999) and Road to Perdition (2002). Like he did with Skyfall (2012), Mendes sticks with dark shadows and film noir elements that keep the spy genre intact…more so than any Bond film prior. A use of tight quarters—as seen in the tunnels, narrow hallways and secret passages in Skyfall—mirrored Bond’s psychology, of a green agent once full of piss and malt vinegar and his new assassin
world falling in around him. That space expands in SPECTRE as a more comfortable and confident Bond appears in wide open spaces more footloose and fancy.

It’s also a Bond I think we all wanted to see when Casino Royale (2006) was released. One where Q comes in all serious trying to show Bond the latest spy gadgets and Bond refuses to listen setting off guns and bombs by accident much to Q’s chastising. The Q here as in Skyfall is once again played by Ben Whishaw, originally played by Desmond Llewelyn, then John Cleese, both older, wiser, dryer, funnier seasoned professionals than Whishaw though Whishaw’s youth shakes things up. It’s a Bond tradition, that reprieve from the action to see some neat stuff and get a laugh or two before traveling on to distant, exotic locations to use our new found tools of the trade. But the Broccoli family—Albert Broccoli and then later his daughter Barbara—who adapted and produced nearly all of the Ian Fleming Bond books, and non-Fleming stories, seemed to have liked the idea of keeping Craig’s Bond more grounded, more real; a man who uses his brains and fists before using toys. And thus the traditions went away…at least the gadget ones did.

Craig’s Bond has stayed consistent through all of the films making his dramatic, smoldering, psychologically affected inner conflicted self something of an anomaly for the character. And it’s something fans grew to like. It’s what has set Craig apart from Connery, Moore and Brosnan. Mendes who draws out the best “off broadway” moments in characters came in at the right time on Skyfall to define Craig’s Bond as one of the greatest of all time. Craig helps in that matter delivering the best acting of any Bond actor and I use every weird, fight, dying, torture scene of Casino Royale as proof. And it’s Mendes’ use of cinema—not high-key comedic lighting and neat spy games—that brought respect back to the character.

The Flaws: So while Craig is still Bond why not give us a little of what we’ve traditionally liked about the James Bond movies, like I mentioned above. Tradition. Let’s see how the “new” Bond does with these familiar situations. Can he fight a metal-toothed heavy nicknamed “Jaws” like Roger Moore did in The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)? On a moving train no less. Or can he resist a blade infused top hat like that worn by Oddjob in Goldfinger (1964)? Follow Goldfinger’s ’37 Rolls Royce Phantom like a spy, in his ’63 Aston Martin DB5 with the ejector seat, machine guns in the headlights, bullet proof wall in the trunk and oil spewing tail lights and then use it to escape? Somehow all of that—and the cool watches—come to mind here even if it’s not in this movie (even the subtle nod to Jaws the shark movie when beer kegs take the place of buoys in a key SPECTRE fight scene can say to the audience, “Look, it’s Jaws!”). It’s a bold move by Mendes and writers John Logan, Neal Purvis, Robert Wade and Jez Butterworth all of whom have written previous Bond scripts except Butterworth, to dip into the doodad and reference world, i.e. fandom, of older Bond films when there really hasn’t been any of that in all of Craig’s films.

And the first hour of SPECTRE works great. It all goes off extremely well and I’m thinking I’m seeing the best Bond film yet. Overconfident and comfortable Bond knows how good he is and after a few action-packed and stunt crazy scenarios he waltzes in (no pun intended) to overwhelming circumstances he’s not quite ready for. There’s a quick escape, and a car chase—with the kind of cars you’d expect, beside the latest Aston Martin a Jaguar C-X75…real cars we’ve never seen before. And it’s all masterfully done, all of it, even the overly familiar parts, until we meet Blofeld.

The idea generally is you ratchet up the conflicts and escapes and massage the audience with that ebb and flow of plot but here it fails. I blame the writing for one because the writers are delivering an origins story for Blofeld but they never quite find that arc, or the sympathy with the audience, or even an inkling of care for the villain that would pull us in, make us believe.

Instead, venturing into the familiar territory of past Bond gadgets and superhero feats we get moments of implausibility and failure to suspend disbelief. That’s only in the second half of the film mind you. What we get is a sort of anticlimactic race to a finish replete with ticking clock scenarios not unlike Bond diffusing bombs in any number of films, including Goldfinger specifically. To make matters worse, Waltz as a bad guy did better in The Green Hornet (2011). Remember, I’m just talking about the second half of the movie where it looks like they ran out of time and money. Waltz in the first half, in shadows, as a mysterious leader of SPECTRE, is superb. Breathtaking.

I often look to find solutions in a film that develops a sinkhole mid way. That’s the first sign that it has failed. I always say too that in situations like this that my post will be the shortest I’ve written. Never is the case. And the reason why is I go into all these counter stories, or alternatives that in my head somehow right the film. They say to learn to write a good script you should study bad ones. True. In this situation there’s a lovely opportunity to take James Bond, one we’ve not quite known before, with Craig as this latest Bond that he is, in the sort of origins path we’ve been led down, to shake things up a little in terms of story. Like if all the change, including physical change, revolved around setting up shop, learning to do reports for someone who is usually in the field, to creating this through-line theme of change to upend the whole Bond story and take our characters into new territories; to juxtapose the office life of a double-o spy due to changing times to one where the hero escapes at night to track down mysteries, while that sounds like The Incredibles (2004), it can be the spark of something magnificently different. Sure, give us the Bond we expect but break up that expectation a little, make us work for it. Treat the double-o program like a corporation that has all the mechanisms of today’s work place, having to deal with budgets and politics, staff meetings and one-on-one management meetings with the new boss, M, and his new position; paper pushing, word processors, fax machines, adding paper to the copier, mover guys putting in cubes, tearing down walls…for Bond to say, “I need to get out of here.”

The bad guy then, you see, is the one who saves the day in that scenario. Not destroys the film.

The Call: Stow the dough. It’s a tough call only because the first hour is rock solid. But by dipping into familiar territory (see secluded Alpine hideout on top of a snow covered mountain, a’ la On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969), or even For Your Eyes Only (1981)) SPECTRE becomes less of a nostalgic film, certainly not a reboot, but more like a game of “can you guess the James Bond film being referenced.” A slippery slope they should have never started down. Instead, give us something completely different, fish out of water, and throw Bond and his gadgets into that unfamiliar territory—say Wall Street. What would that be like? Ninety-nine percent better.

Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of action and violence, some disturbing images, sensuality and language. Running time is 2 hours and 28 minutes. Don’t get me started on Lea Seydoux. Eva Green as Vesper Lynd from Casino Royale and Carol Bouquet as Melina Havelock from For Your Eyes Only ruined the spot of Bond girl for all others, because they were so good, but especially for Lea Seydoux whose character here has all the personality of a turtle.

#spectre #movie #review #james bond #007
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And the nominees for the "Best Car Movie of All Time" are . . . #Oscars
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The #Oscars air tonight, and the show couldn't go on without a lot of hard work from a lot of special people. Take a peek behind the scenes at the +Oscars #throughglass.
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OSCARS 2014

The 86th Academy Awards hosted this time by Ellen DeGeneres will air at 8pm Sunday on ABC and will also for the first time stream live online in some markets.  The bigger news however is the tight race in the SUPPORTING ACTRESS category.

BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE features two nominees vastly different in experience and technique yet equally scene stealing in their performances.  Lupita Nyong’o the Yale drama graduate in 12 Years a Slave and Jennifer Lawrence the three-time Oscar nominee and last year’s Best Actress winner nominated here for American Hustle.  

Nyong’o’s portrayal is of Patsey, a young girl demolished by slavery and beleaguered by her owner played by Michael Fasbinder, also nominated for a supporting role.  Like Lawrence’s character Rosalyn in American Hustle Patsey is a young woman longing to be anywhere else than where she is and anyone else than who she is.  Both are women who have been forced to leave childhood prematurely but who try to snatch it back when no one is looking.  Except someone is always looking, whether its Rosalyn’s young son or Patsey’s friend Solomon played by Best Actor nominee Chiwetel Ejiofor, or the wife of Patsey’s owner played by Sarah Paulson.  

Obviously one woman has the freedom to make a difference while the other does not, and in that action and lack of action—one woman passive and forced to live a tormented life, the other bounding, unbridled and oozing with as much freedom as a house wife with child can—we see and experience human energy in two very distinct ways.  No other performances in this Oscar category exude that much force, moving or static, coming from the life, or lack of it, on screen.  Unfortunately Lawrence’s character is privileged enough to have an air of whimsy and comedy beneath a tragic but fortunate American setting while Patsey’s American condition is humorless and heartbreaking.  

That small amount of positive power Lawrence is able to deliver—based on the roll written for her from the Oscar nominated original screenplay—gives her the upper hand.  The winner here should be Lawrence by the aggregate of cinematic provisions working in her favor.  Nyong’o unfortunately bares a more reactive rather than active performance based on the circumstances.  I’ll be happy if either actress wins but Lawrence’s energy emanating from her portrayal is a jaw dropping spectacle you rubberneck to every time she appears.

The category that could be a real shocker however is the BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE.  30 Seconds to Mars singer Jared Leto plays Rayon, a drug induced man in women’s clothing in Dallas Buyer’s Club, trying to survive AIDS with co-star and Best Actor nominee Matthew McConaughey.  Leto’s Rayon as a gay man in mid ‘80’s Texas is, for lack of a better word, tender.  It’s delicate as Leto tries to portray Rayon as just that.  Fragile.  And that fragility is not made prevalent with the help of weight loss or any physical attributes but by voice and facial expression and delivery of lines.  It’s a very quiet performance that is sweet and tragic at the same time.  His character is not easy to sympathize with either because of his self-mutilating drug use.  Leto is favored to win this category.

But the shocker could be a Jonah Hill win.  Martin Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street is so extravagant in its portrayal of Wall Street hedonism that the sense of fun you suspect went on behind the scenes while filming such a putridly funny, almost slapstick slice of ‘90’s Wall Street criminal adventure, gives everyone in that film a huge net to work within.  A very broad path to chew up parts of script with.  And Jonah’s performance is just as over the top and extravagant as the movie—and Scorsese’s cinematic approach—is to the subject matter.  I think an air of excess on the set allowed Hill to do whatever he wanted so long as he wore those big prosthetic teeth.  The Wolf of Wall Street is one of the best films of the year and though it won’t win any awards it should at the very least get an Oscar for the best performance by a supporting actor in the role.  Jared Leto will win but it should be Jonah Hill.

Here are the rest of my picks:

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN:  The Great Gatsby

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE:  The Act of Killing

BEST DOCUMENTARY SHORT:  The Lady in Number 6: Music Saved My Life

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE:  Frozen

BEST ANIMATED SHORT:  Get a Horse!

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY:  Gravity

BEST COSTUME DESIGN:  The Great Gatsby

BEST MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING:  Dallas Buyer’s Club

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE:  Her

BEST ORIGINAL SONG:  Frozen

BEST LIVE ACTION SHORT:  The Voorman Problem

BEST SOUND MIXING:  Gravity

BEST SOUND EDITING:  Gravity

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS:  Gravity

BEST FILM EDITING:  Gravity

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY:  American Hustle

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY:  12 Years A Slave

BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE:  Matthew McConaughey

BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE:  Cate Blanchett

BEST DIRECTING:  Alfonso Cuaron, Gravity

BEST PICTURE:  12 Years A Slave
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56 Photographers in 49 Chinese Cities make a timelapse video together without ever meeting one another.

http://vimeo.com/m/77773755
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I just used Shazam to tag I Can Hardly Make You Mine by Cults.
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THE REVENANT

This could be Leonardo DiCaprio’s year at the 2016 Oscars, though he should have won it for What’s Eating Gilbert Grape (1993), and maybe for The Wolf of Wall Street (2013). Either way, The Oscars can be cold to true talent as we all know, and so can this pre-Civil War wilderness revenge film from Oscar winning director Alejandro Inarritu.

The Story: Hugh Glass (DiCaprio) is a hired hand in 1922 mid-west America, along with several other men, for the Rocky Mountain Fur Company led by Captain Andrew Henry (Dohmnall Gleeson). When Glass, who leads the group with his exceptional tracking skills, is attacked by a bear and nearly dies, it takes the entire group to gurney him back to base. The inclement weather, treacherous terrain and French settlers and their scalp-ripping partners from the Arikara Native American tribe, along with strong dissent from crew member Fitzgerald (Tom Hardy), make it exceptionally difficult for Glass who finds he needs to survive and heal himself in order to exact revenge on a deceitful, murderous Fitzgerald.

The Goods: That bear attack, the one Jonah Hill appeared as at this year’s Golden Globes, and the bear everyone who sees this film seems to be discussing, is genius, in the sense it is definitely without a doubt all computer animated. The scene looks, feels and sounds as real as anything you might suspect could happen when a strange man happens upon a Grizzly’s cubs, which Glass does by accident. The fur, the voice, the breath of the animal is all created from computers and their artists and the movie magic is sick, as the kids say. Sick. It’s real, though it’s not real, and the scene which covers the entire attack, is recorded as if it’s all one take, one long recorded shot–as most cell phone videos are one take–captured in nature by Oscar winning cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki and Industrial Light & Magic CGI team comprised of nominees Rich McBride, Matthew Shumway, Jason Smith and Cameron Waldbauer. That’s two more Oscars there, for Cinematography and Visual Effects, and it should be noted this will be a hat trick for Lubezki who won for Gravity in 2013 and Birdman in 2014. An amazing feat in itself.

The other part of The Revenant’s magic is that Inarritu loves these long takes (what seems like long takes as cheated in Birdman, which was seemingly one long shot the entire film). That style of letting the camera capture and not interrupt the action seals the film in this realm of surreal realism, surreal because we are there in the cold, winter, icy mountains or forest or riverside watching the action unfold like a documentary. The limitation on cuts and edits keeps the film as seemingly pure as possible. And Lubezki filmed all this without lights, without the normal studio grip, electric and gaffing support the camera department requires. What the camera records then is even more pure and real and that natural lighting is stunning. I mean, it makes sense to film it this way due to the harsh conditions. But it doesn’t look like crap. The film celluloid, not digital video, sucks it in and renders it all crystal clear with sharp blacks and contrast. There is nothing muddy or grainy about any lack of light the situation may have presented. Instead, the photography will win an Oscar.

One thing you’ll notice is the eyes of characters, like Fitzgerald and Glass, glow and glisten with the natural reflection of light bouncing off of the snow and frozen tundra. It captures extra intensity in the characters and gives them superhuman traits of sort, the kind of subliminal aura an extra’s zombie eye contacts can do for a horror film. At times it’s as if you can see into their souls, and some, like Fitzgerald, seem soulless.

Hardy, too, needs an Oscar for this role. He exudes country frontiersman, self serving, wild and conniving, where the yellow of cowardice is disguised by the strength of confidence behind knives and guns, and the language of dumb men taught by the dumb, Neanderthal men before them. Hardy’s Fitzgerald tells a story about his father and how he came to learn reason from his father’s atheistic discovery of God. The telling is so enriched, and matter of fact, coming on the heals of steely killings that you might think Fitzgerald himself has discovered the secrets of survival. He has actually, but his secrets are gothic, campfire scary, and just as American as the ones learned by Glass.

And let us not forget that we need to include an actor’s interaction with CGI objects and characters today when we consider their performances which, in addition to the extraordinary survival mechanics and real life events DiCaprio endured to make this film, he also leads us to really believe he is mauled by a bear.

The Flaws: My problem with the film however is it’s all too familiar, having grown up seeing and being fascinated by survival and Native American relations in Jeremiah Johnson (1972) and The Mountain Men (1980) amongst other, long man-vs-nature films. I don’t think it’s enough to showcase America in all its natural, wild glory, in terms of exploring and settling the West; the majesty of flowing rivers against pastel winter sunsets and golden reeds against the shoreline, contrasted with the violence of men trampling over men to take what they want, to divide and conquer and to massacre, red blood on white snow, when its been done in countless movies.

What is it that sets The Revenant apart from other films? Is it only that it’s DiCaprio cutting open a horse in a snow storm and finding warmth inside its dead cavity? Or is it the spectacle of seeing his character attacked by a bear? Or, like in a Charles Bronson film from the ‘70’s and '80’s, is it revenge in what is ultimately a revenge film? To me none of that warrants “best picture,” and if it weren’t for the director and cinematographer I doubt I would actively seek out and watch this film. Because it certainly is not entertaining outside of these spectacles–the greatest of which, again, is the fantastic capturing of sun, light and nature in America’s wintery heartland.

And ultimately, what really saddens me about all of this, is the undoing of all that hard work by these talented people in the single handed choice to end the film in the way Inarritu does. The last shot, which I can only equate to the Native American crying on the side of the road in that famous anti-pollution ad from the '70’s, destroys this nearly three hour film in a matter of seconds.

The Call: I say the big screen has the advantage here and you owe it to the crew, and yourself, to see The Revenant on the biggest screen you can. But other than for photography, I’d say stow the dough. Stay inside, keep yourself warm.

Rated R for strong frontier combat and violence including gory images, a sexual assault, language and brief nudity. Running time is 2 hour and 36 minutes.
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Hattie McDaniel, First African American to Get an Oscar, Makes a Moving Speech at Academy Awards (1940). Video http://cultr.me/1fYOSZ1
In 1940, Hattie McDaniel became the first African American to win an Academy Award, taking home the Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her turn as Mammy in Gone with the Wind.
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Who do you want to win Best Picture tonight at the Oscars?
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#Oscars Sunday is tomorrow! Try these 8 Award-Winning Popcorn #Recipes Worthy of The Red Carpet ➜ http://goo.gl/tD2bzs #AcademyAwards
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RT @TomBenedek: Andrew Stanton talks about Framing the Story Via @nprnews: Framing The Story http://flip.it/CYMzq
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