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Jon Knight
Attended University of Warwick
Lives in Birmingham, United Kingdom
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Jennifer Allaway invites game players and game developers to respond to a survey about diversity in video games.
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Apologies for the reshare - this isn't appearing in my stream or on my profile.
 
Homo sapiens polis?

I like running late at night. It terrifies my family, but honestly, it's perfectly safe. It's also one of the few times that, as an antisocial atheist I get to experience really powerful feelings of belonging and what I can only think of as reverence.

To set the scene, I run along the canal towpath towards Wolverhampton and back again - turning around when the robot in my phone I obey unconditionally tells me I'm half way. (I know which side I want to be on come the uprising.)

The night is incredibly still, and hazy, so the skyglow over the city is intense, a yellow glow, that somehow manages to fill the sky. To one side of me are train tracks, with the occasional rattling train. In the distance behind it the BT tower; still a magnificent sight despite having been denuded of satellite dishes and being shorter than it's sibling in London. To the other are a series of derelict Victorian warehouses and light industrial buildings; encrusted with the additions and changes of 100 years or more of existence, engrimed with graffiti, litter and signs of decay. At my feet is the canal, reflecting all this, adding a bare ripple to the image.

And I feel part of something. Something amazing. Humans have been setting lights to fend off the dark for as long as we've been human. The canals and the buildings they fed with men, raw materials and access to markets led to the very existence of this city - Birmingham still boasts (perhaps unwisely) of having more miles of canal than Venice.

The canals now are a tourist trap. The accretion of riverside bars and appartments hasn't made it out this far yet, leaving them in their faded grandeur, but it is only a matter of time before they too are drawn back into the living city; since it is built, as all cities are, from - and on - their own remains.

The trains have probably changed the least. The basic principle would be familiar to anyone from the age of steam - though the safety, speed, comfort and capacity we take so for granted would astound them. The BT tower, conversely, is perhaps the saddest. The youngest addition to the city, since found surplus to requirements, but preserved thanks to the efforts of those who appreciate it's presence on the horizon. (I love it - I've never lived anywhere where I can look up and see immediately which way is home.) A post-industrial, pre-digital white elephant. That is being turned into the core of a new apartment block. The city once again finding a way to turn the remnants of the past into the foundation of the future.

And yes, I know this is all people. And companies. And councils. Trying to make money or make their mark on posterity. But almost all of life is a story of elements in a fascinating dance of codependency and competition. The cells in your body don't all die when you do. You are the pattern they make all working together. When the dance stumbles and stops, it's every cell for itself, but after so long working together they don't survive long alone. Cities are not so different. Longer lived certainly, but alive nonetheless.

As someone who doesn't often feel comfortable joining groups, feeling a part of this stately ageless dance is a way to be part of a story bigger than yourself. Not through a sacrifice, or great labour, but simply, being. Working. Playing. Living. Letting yourself be part of the city. 
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Injoyed reading about how you think.The little boy I recall has grown up .
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I really like the idea of this, and I can see the appeal to them of having lots of reviews, but I'm honestly not sure it's sustainable in a UK city outside of London...
 
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The glittering shape in front of you writhes, burrowing into the cold gritty sand. It is strangely mutable - one moment all hard and angles and gleaming flashes of light, the next smoxy tendrils. Your point of view draws back, receding from the flickering twitching impossibility. 

The landscape it reveals is not much better. The landscape shifts in a rhythm of it's own. As you watch it changes from ash, to sand, to a a fluorescent grey on black grid, to a fibrous flickering mesh. The sky... simply isn't there. The void pulls at your mind and you think, sometimes, that you can see the landscape rise upwards in the far distance. You refuse to look directly upwards for fear of what you might see. A voice starts speaking. 

"Of course this isn't an accurate depiction. It was chosen to best represent it, without the need for PhD level maths, strong pharmaceuticals or both. In the late 21st Century research into cluster headaches, migraines, and the multiverse implications of the big bang collided unexpectedly."

"It was hypothesised that creatures like the one you just saw might be to blame for these potentially crippling headaches. In the material plane - our everyday universe - they would be the equivalent of herbivores. There are several types, their behaviour inferred from the nature of the malady they inflict. Some are territorial, following a convoluted but regular route; some wander, never revisiting the same mind twice. The universe they inhabit however, is one of abstracts, thought and computation. And what they graze on is us."

As the narrator stops speaking, your viewpoint swoops again towards the monstrosity. You see now that it is burrowing into the ground, disturbing it. As the ground cycles through a mesh phase, you see flickers coursing through the mesh dim as they pass near the creature, which gets slowly brighter, pulsing more strongly. 

"It was discovered quite quickly - after several of the original researchers were hospitalised - that knowledge of this theory actually made the headaches worse. Much as thinking about the pain strengthened the connection to the creature, thinking about the creature itself made the connection much stronger. Ultimately though, through great sacrifice we found a way to deter the creatures."

Now you notice that the flickering of the ground is in counterpoint to that of the creature. It seems to strive to shift frequency, but the 'ground' - some poor persons mind - reacts just as quickly. The creature starts dimming, and quickly writhes away from the patch, the illusion/illustration somehow - perhaps in a shrinking, a drawing in - makes it clear the creature is exhausted from it's battle. 

"Of course, this just forced the creatures from one mind to the next. It privileged people who had heard of the research and had the time and energy to learn the techniques. A massive public education program was launched to teach the techniques to everyone on earth, in the hopes that with their food supply drastically reduced the creatures would move on."

With this, the viewpoint swoops up dizzyingly, until a vast array of what you now think of as thought-scape is revealed. What you see now is, you realise, being sped up, as specks of light, gradually growing dimmer are pushed outward. But outward into what?

"As the program continued successfully, two questions began to grow in importance. 'If we are such a small fraction of the thought-scape, who does the rest of it represent?' and 'Herbivores never evolve in isolation. Where are the predators?' Both questions have since been answered, and in the process changed humanity forever."

From your newly elevated perch, you can see a few examples of a new type of creature flying far above the shifting mind-scape, dotted with fleeing herbivores. Drifting, they look simply like clouds, but when they come near prey they change into elegant crystalline shapes, somewhere between a paper dart and a raptor. Seeming to skip at least some of the intervening space, the creature launches into the fleeing grazer, removing whatever vital spark it is that drives the creature.

As the predator launches, satisfied, back into the air, the land under the corpse seems to either shrink, or move further away, or perhaps both at the same time; while leaving the land to either side untouched. But the land here represents minds...

"The campaign to drive off the herbivores had unintended consequences. Thanks to the change in their behaviour, the creatures became easy prey, and whoever they were feeding on - no matter how lightly - at the time paid the price. Sometimes, if the creature was moving when it died, two people died at exactly the same time. While it was a tragedy, it prompted us to start mapping the mind-scape."

"That exact timing allowed us to find people who were close in the mind-scape. Surveys of the people they left behind let us find out about them, and how they related. Geography was found to be unimportant, as were race and gender. The co-ordinates of this strange other space were partly to do with how people conceived of the physical universe; and partly to do with how they related to other minds. It turns out that while telepathy as it was imagined was still impossible, people could communicate, however imperfectly, with their 'neighbours'."

The landscape starts to change beneath you. The rolling dunes start to shift, slowly rumbling together, to form ever larger peaks. There isn't a single peak, but what was a wide and seemingly random landscape now looks variously like a termite mound or crystalline palace as it continues to shift. The last few herbivores almost roll down the sides of the slope, while the lazy circles of the predators, once far above the dunes, are now below the highest peaks. 

"One of the many realisations during this incredible aligning of humanity was that the lost and forgotten people on the edges of society were vitally important. Thinking the least like everyone else, they formed our borders in the mindscape, making them part guard and part ambassador. How many races abandoned us at seeing the our treatment of those among us who thought most like them?"

Your viewpoint once again draws further upwards, and from the gloom around the spires of humanity, other peaks appear - interspersed among them patches of the desert you remember. Slowly, you see outcroppings from these marvellous constructions touch, gingerly, before a bridge is formed, gradually widening and thickening as these two people, impossibly distant in real-space become more alike. 

"We are in contact with a multitude of races, each of which is in contact with still more. Humanity is at peace with itself for the first time, and part of a grand project. A vast construction is taking place in the physical universe to allow our species to come closer together in mind-space, and allow us to connect with minds even further removed from our own - from other physical universes entirely. When you wake, you will be one of the billion humans selected to be part of the Babylon Project."

Windows open on each of the towers you can see. Each reveals a vessel, of massively variable construction; you see examples of every type of ship humanity has imagined and some that refuse to resolve into anything recognisable at all. All are rushing, at impossible speeds to the same point where orbiting a  strange new star you will learn to think like each other, relaying everything back to those you have left behind. 

Already you see the mindscape starting to change. After all, there are now untold minds with the same goal, the same fascination with new exotic ways of being of thinking. 

"Good luck."

#flashfic #sf
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How's it going?
Neale.
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And so the ponzi pyramid of curses grows...
 
http://gabrielecirulli.github.io/2048/

When you curse my name, I shall laugh.
Join the numbers and get to the 2048 tile! Careful: this game is extremely addictive!
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Twitter as a protocol
I spend a lot of my life on twitter. I get a lot of my news from it. It helps communities form and react to events quicker than ever. It is unique in it's reach. 

It's also unique for another reason. It is all a single company. I find this deeply disturbing. Unless you are willing to engage with this one company, you are shut out of a vastly important swathe of online communication. Imagine if email or web pages were owned in the same way - everyone around the world with a hotmail account an a google-plus page. Layers over the top providing some distinctiveness, but the whole edifice vulnerable to the whims of one corporation. 

So. What could be done about this? Well, way back when, twitter was referred to as microblogging. Blogs are not homogenous(1). Why not? Well, there is a vague consensus about structure, and a simple syndication/subscription process allowing people to follow lots of them. Couldn't microblogging go the same way? I think it could - and probably should. This has two prongs: the tech and the company. 

Tech
Any micro blogging platform needs to supply two things, a publishing platform and a subscription ability. 

The publishing is, I think, the easy bit. A microblog-stream is essentially an XML stream, with content surrounded by a cloud of metadata, detailing who posted it, where, and a direct link to the specific microblog. It would be quite straightforward to turn a well formed XML stream of this type into a web page, or use it to drive an app. 

Subscription is slightly harder. You don't have a single database of every microblog stream being published. You'd need to spider the web to find them and add streams to your list of streams to merge and display. I'd also expect display rules to be part of the subscription - character limits, picture harvesting, short-link resolving etc. 

With the right open source packages, anyone could host this on their own site; allowing the hosted stream to be spidered and pulling in and displaying the requested streams in a channel alongside. Which people with their own website or a dedicated tech department could do. Hooking this up to third party clients and authenticating posts/changes is eminently possible. 

The company
I've just described a ton of tech. Where does it come from? Well, the hosting process I've just described above has non-zero technical requirements. What about a hosting company? I admit I'm cribbing wildly from the WordPress business model here, but I'd expect the company that built this software to have a massive advantage in hosting it. 

Fundamentally, as open as you make this, not everyone will want to host this themselves. I'd anticipate two tiers of users. On the one hand you have people required to use default settings and the ad-supported website, on the other you have people willing to pay £Xpcm for the right to use third party apps, have an ad-free experience and tweak their settings more. 

Also, there is a ton of b2b potential here: Have a giant database of spidered microblog streams? Sell access to people who want to also provide a hosting experience who can't afford to spider the web. Have a ton of data about how people connect and communicate? Don't just sell the data, sell insight (selling raw material is rarely as lucrative as selling a manufactured product). Have a dev-team with bone-deep knowledge of the micro-blogging standards? Sell custom clients to companies with specific customer-service requirements. 

Risks
Of course, it does need to be interoperable with Twitter - at least initially. It's the only way to build a user base. This will be tricky. I would say that it needs to be done in an if-this-then-that(2) way, except twitter recently deliberately stopped ittt from working with Twitter. It will also be messier, more asynchronous and more varied than twitter. Personally I think this is a good thing, but it may limit adoption rates. It also raises the issue of abuse. How to spot it and how to stop it. 

In some ways having this be open, paradoxically makes it easier. If companies are just hosts, they can have policies, which when breached just get you kicked off (since they aren't denying your right to participate, they just don't wish to help). I can imagine trolls migrating to "@subscriber.trolls.com" or "@troll.mydomain.com", which should make them easier to manage. 

Conclusion
So, why aren't I working on this in coffee shops on my laptop rather than write this? I'm not a web-developer. I'm a kinda-developer in a ludicrously high level language, with a tendency towards requirement analysis and design. Also, while I think this is important and should be done, honestly, it's not something I feel so strongly about I'm willing to spend all my free time for the foreseeable pursuing it - which is what it would need. However, if you see anyone trying something like this, point me at it and I'll contribute where I can. 

(1) Ignoring the recent trend toward everyone and their dog having a tumblr instead of a blog. 
(2) A web-service that monitors other web services, when they update/report a specific result, it performs some activity you describe - emailing you or cross-posting to another service etc. 
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Jon: Yes, a lot of those types are on it.  But not many others are on it to actually read them....  This is why it's hyped well beyond it's actual reach.
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More #Hugo thoughts - this time for the #novellete category.

First thing, I haven't read Vox Day's nominated work. The man is, by all accounts, odious. I have no intention of giving the man a chance to get inside my head.

Kowal's The Lady Astronaut here is a standout. I'd read it before, though I can't remember where. I do remember it made me cry then, just as it did on re-reading it, which is exceptionally rare. A beautiful piece.

de Bodard's The waiting stars is similarly a piece about longing and difficult decisions. I'd happily read a novel from this setting, but it felt very compressed.

Chiang's The Truth of fact, the Truth of feeling is an interesting piece about relationships, thought and personhood. For some reason didn't resonate with me as strongly as the others, but I think that's a reflection on me and my experiences/preferences rather than the writing.

Torgersen's The Exchange Officers is in awkward company. A relatively straightforward SF yarn, with relatively little emotional content. It is fun, if a little choppily structured, but has nowhere near the impact of the others.


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Didn't really need one. It (to me) was a very forgettable story. 
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Finally starting to read my #Hugo fiction. Starting with the short stuff (since I've read most of the novels already). I'm listing them by author, since that's how they're organised in the pack. (Note: I'm posting these publicly for ease of sharing. Apologies to any authors upset by my thoughts. I don't often wrote reviews and I'm probably too tired to word things as politically as I might!

Short stories
1: Chu (The water that falls on you from nowhere) Unique genre premise is used to heighten what would have been a fascinating story about family which then pivots to something even more personal.

2: Swirsky (If you were a dinosaur) Very sweet. The shortest of the four. Elegantly clever, migrating effortlessly to poignant during the piece.

3: Olde Heuvelt (The ink readers of Doi Saket) Very close to equal second. While it is a lovely piece, I think it is a little overcomplicated. But that is part of the charm, with all the asides and world building. Hmm, not sure.

4: Samatar (Selkie Stories) Second shortest. In some ways the most traditional flash/short fic. A nice piece about alienation but without perhaps some of the punch of the others. 
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not got round to reading if you were a dinosaur yet as it was a late addition to the packet and I haven't uploaded it to my kindle yet. If agree on the order of the other three though. 
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Homo sapiens polis?

I like running late at night. It terrifies my family, but honestly, it's perfectly safe. It's also one of the few times that, as an antisocial atheist I get to experience really powerful feelings of belonging and what I can only think of as reverence.

To set the scene, I run along the canal towpath towards Wolverhampton and back again - turning around when the robot in my phone I obey unconditionally tells me I'm half way. (I know which side I want to be on come the uprising.)

The night is incredibly still, and hazy, so the skyglow over the city is intense, a yellow glow, that somehow manages to fill the sky. To one side of me are train tracks, with the occasional rattling train. In the distance behind it the BT tower; still a magnificent sight despite having been denuded of satellite dishes and being shorter than it's sibling in London. To the other are a series of derelict Victorian warehouses and light industrial buildings; encrusted with the additions and changes of 100 years or more of existence, engrimed with graffiti, litter and signs of decay. At my feet is the canal, reflecting all this, adding a bare ripple to the image.

And I feel part of something. Something amazing. Humans have been setting lights to fend off the dark for as long as we've been human. The canals and the buildings they fed with men, raw materials and access to markets led to the very existence of this city - Birmingham still boasts (perhaps unwisely) of having more miles of canal than Venice.

The canals now are a tourist trap. The accretion of riverside bars and appartments hasn't made it out this far yet, leaving them in their faded grandeur, but it is only a matter of time before they too are drawn back into the living city; since it is built, as all cities are, from - and on - their own remains.

The trains have probably changed the least. The basic principle would be familiar to anyone from the age of steam - though the safety, speed, comfort and capacity we take so for granted would astound them. The BT tower, conversely, is perhaps the saddest. The youngest addition to the city, since found surplus to requirements, but preserved thanks to the efforts of those who appreciate it's presence on the horizon. (I love it - I've never lived anywhere where I can look up and see immediately which way is home.) A post-industrial, pre-digital white elephant. That is being turned into the core of a new apartment block. The city once again finding a way to turn the remnants of the past into the foundation of the future.

And yes, I know this is all people. And companies. And councils. Trying to make money or make their mark on posterity. But almost all of life is a story of elements in a fascinating dance of codependency and competition. The cells in your body don't all die when you do. You are the pattern they make all working together. When the dance stumbles and stops, it's every cell for itself, but after so long working together they don't survive long alone. Cities are not so different. Longer lived certainly, but alive nonetheless.

As someone who doesn't often feel comfortable joining groups, feeling a part of this stately ageless dance is a way to be part of a story bigger than yourself. Not through a sacrifice, or great labour, but simply, being. Working. Playing. Living. Letting yourself be part of the city. 
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Nerdiness quantifier. Do you see:
A: a doughnut
B: a doughnut with some 'exotic' script on
C: a doughnut with generic fantasy writing on
D: a doughnut with that writing on from that film
E: a doughnut with LoTR writing on
F: a doughnut with Tolkien Elvish on
G: a doughnut with an obvious spelling mistake on
 
Fried over the fires of Mount Doom, the One Donut to rule them all: http://j.mp/1lGMM5l by MirachRavaia
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I've had several people point out that it looks like the text from the inside of the one ring, which means that while it's in the Elvish alphabet, it's actually orcish, or black script.

Apparently my quiz containing no right answers was causing quite a few twitches...
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Some photos from the recent family weekend away for my Mum's birthday at the faintly ludicrous - but in a good way - Old Hall in rural Norfolk. http://www.theoldhall.net/

Photos: The #QX10 is fun, but I'm still not quite convinced. It takes just a fraction too long to set up and respond. Also, since it disconnects when the screen locks, it causes you to burn phone battery at a phenomenal rate. That said, there are shots here I'm reasonably sure I just couldn't get with a phone. 
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Copied here from twitter for easier reading. And a bit of editing.

Via +Michael Newton I saw a link to a test I vaguely remember doing years ago - though I don't remember the result, purporting to return an Autism Quotient. http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/9.12/aqtest.html I finally got around to it & despite when answering bearing in mind my recent attempts to get out more, got 36, which is quite high given that 80% of people with ASD score 32+. While it's not diagnostic & high scorers are often perfectly capable, it's a timely reminder that I am probably not NT [neurotypical].

At least not all the time. I definitely mode-switch. Which is, being uncharacteristically optimistic, actually quite useful. Switching between laser-focus and fuzzy-mode is handy. However, I think there's something underlying the two modes which I think is why http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/09/magazine/reaching-my-autistic-son-through-disney.html?_r=0 hit me so hard. I can relate, not to the parent, but the son. Particularly the description of building rules of behaviour from stories first, then testing them against experience, rather than starting with experience. It sometimes feels like I have to use slow logic where others use instinct. Especially since I tend towards intuition in almost every other sphere it can be immensely frustrating.

It's perhaps also why stories/songs about learning to be human matter so much to me. It's how I learnt. Am learning. Some things still throw me. People pretending to be angry while joking (or any combination thereof) confuse me utterly. I cannot read it at all and find it weirdly stress-inducing.

And thus concludes my nightly self-analysis. End credits: http://mariancall.bandcamp.com/track/fret-bonus-track ("I think instead of feel, but if that’s okay with you")
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Education
  • University of Warwick
    Physics, 1999 - 2003
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I know there are lots of Jon's out there: I'm the quiet bookish one with the big laugh.
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Jon Knight's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
unimaginable Inscape Landscape organizes everything within sight ...
landscape.blogspot.com

In a keynote address delivered to the Berlin Open Knowledge Festival earlier this year, Googler Eric Hysen set up some big stakes for Google

Much Ado About Nothing (2012)
market.android.com

Shakespeare’s classic comedy is given a contemporary spin in Joss Whedon’s film, Much Ado About Nothing. Using the original text, the story

Throne of the Crescent Moon
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Traditional swords & sorcery fantasy with an authentic middle-eastern spin. The Crescent Moon Kingdoms, land of djenn and ghuls, holy warri

Blondie - Heart Of Glass (Stretched 7" Version)
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Time-stretched version of 'Heart Of Glass' by Blondie. http://www.blondie.net https://www.facebook.com/Blondie https://twitter.com/blondieof

Kids can't use computers... and this is why it should worry you - Coding...
coding2learn.org

TL;DR? Why not just go watch another five second video of a kitten with it’s head in a toilet roll, or a 140 character description of a meal

Waking Mars
market.android.com

Praise for Waking Mars:"One of the most satisfying gaming experiences I've had on this platform." - TouchArcade, 5/5“The most interesting st

Me and Sad Keanu: A 3D-Printing Story
www.theatlantic.com

I ordered him one day from a website that sells 3D-printed objects, a marketplace for goods created in the new way. Then I forgot all about

Marian Call
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Marian Call is an Alaskan artist who tours the world on a shoestring singing for her supper. She will probably be playing sometime this year

Olympic Medals per Capita
medalspercapita.com

Total Medals per Capita; Gold Medals per Capita; Weighted Medals per Capita; Total Medals by GDP; Total Medals; Gold Medals; Population; Abo

Galaxy Nexus
www.google.com

Galaxy Nexus. First phone with Android 4.0, Face Unlock, Android Beam, an amazing HD screen and 4G LTE fast.

Remote for VLC
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Remote control for VLC media player. Instructions, source code, and license available at: http://code.google.com/p/android-vlc-remote/ *** A

Frozen Synapse: Original Soundtrack
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Shop Google Play on the web. Purchase and enjoy instantly on your Android phone or tablet without the hassle of syncing.

Deus Ex: Human Revolution "Original Soundtrack"
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Shop Google Play on the web. Purchase and enjoy instantly on your Android phone or tablet without the hassle of syncing.

Where's My Water?
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WHERE'S MY WATER IS THE HIT DISNEY APP! NOW WITH OVER 200 LEVELS! WHERE'S MY WATER IS THE HIT DISNEY APP EVERYONE IS PLAYING! NOW WITH OVER

Steubenville: this is rape culture's Abu Ghraib moment
www.newstatesman.com

The pictures from Steubenville don’t just show a girl being raped. They show that rape being condoned, encouraged, celebrated. What type of

Aldiko Book Reader
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Read and download thousands of eBooks right on your Android phone or tablet. Download one of the best Android eBook Readers now! ★The leadin

vinepeek
vinepeek.com

vinepeek shows you newly posted Vines in realtime. Sit back and watch the world in 6 second bites. Best viewed on a desktop browser. Unlike

Ultimate Fudge - Nestlé Carnation
www.carnation.co.uk

"Carnation condensed milk gives the perfect texture and traditional flavour to your fudge. Box them up and give them to your friends at Chr

First visit. The lentil doughnuts were crisp, tasty and fluffy (finally lentils I like!) - though neither of us were overly fond of the dips; the kayal (kingfish) curry was really good, as were the paratha and appam (leavened rice pancakes - fluffy/crispy discs of awesome); OH had the Alapphuza Konju masala which was nice but a little spicy for her.
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
Good combination of cocktails, craft beer and food (tending toward southern American). Can get *ludicrously* busy (with an unfortunate tendency towards braying idiots, which isn't their fault). Decor is modern eclectic and quite cool. Big event space upstairs, which is used to host all sorts of things.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
I live in the middle of town, so probably wouldn't trek out to the hinterlands of Broad St if I didn't get a cheap Cineworld card (free movies) through work. A fairly standard multiplex. Generally disinterested staff, not always quite as clean as you might like, but the screens are generally good and there are certainly lots of them - giving a good range of films, and ensuring they show 2D and 3D version of films - not to mention IMAX.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
5 reviews
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One of my current favourites in Birmingham, great value good food (if you like cherry tomatoes, try the nachos) and a fantastic selection of beer and cider. If you want a quiet meal, head in early evening, it can get get busy later - not least for being tiny. Has a very friendly feel to it, and attracts a nicely mixed crowd, with suited grey-haired older folks rubbing shoulders with younger people sporting tattoos and even the odd hipster. (Plus a load of people in all of these categories or none.)
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
The old owners had to sell due to ill-health just before Christmas, but the new owners (three I believe) are carrying on in the same tradition of selling good food - sourced locally where they can - at great prices. If you get there early enough they have some lovely farmhouse bread. Try it with egg or bacon and the Russian Caravan tea, black. Just be prepared to vibrate for the rest of the day!
Food: Very GoodDecor: Very GoodService: Very Good
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago