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Jon Franklin
Works at Google
Lives in London
150 followers|546,894 views
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Jon Franklin

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Definitely an important watch.

Allan Savory: How to green the world's deserts and reverse climate change: http://youtu.be/vpTHi7O66pI
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It really is very compelling.
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Jon Franklin

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From leaps forward in evolution to devastating asteroid impacts, these were the turning points that shaped our world.
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Jon Franklin

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This needs to be a regular bit. 
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Jon Franklin

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This is a great site to find a good discount on quality items. As a group of people, you can order in bulk. The more place an order, the cheaper it becomes for everyone! 
Massdrop helps people buy together as a group to get awesome prices for things they want. The bigger the group, the better the price!
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Jon Franklin

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If you can't innovate, litigate

So, Europe is going after Google again.

I think this is especially dumb this time, for 2 entirely different reasons.

The first reason is that the underlying reasoning doesn't pass basic logic:

-If you assume that the functionality of Google's search engine is inherently unrelated to their other products (and therefore shouldn't be tied to those other products), you're implying that there's essentially zero "stickiness" to search, i.e. that the fundamental reason why a user would pick one search engine over another for any individual search is based purely on the quality of the search results. Under that assumption, you're implying that the market is purely competitive, and that the reason why so many people use Google's search engine over the competition is that Google's search engine fills those people's needs better.

-If on the other hand you assume that the functionality of Google's search engine is inherently related to their other products, you can't then hold the reasoning that they're artificially tied together. I actually think that Google is in that domain, where their products work very well together.

The second reason is that Europe's other behaviors naturally privilege larger players. One of many such examples is around the "right to be forgotten": the number of search results to censor is the same for a small search engine than it is for a large one, and the cost of censoring those results is disproportionately harder to bear for a smaller search engine than for a large one.

If Europe really wants more competition for Google, they can approach it in several other ways:

-They can take down the laws that favor big players. As an example, for the right to be forgotten, instead of censoring the news results (which isn't a scalable solution in a competitive environment), the information that people don't want to see should be censored at the source (or at least mark it as non-searchable), such that no search engine will show that information, regardless of that search engine's size.

-They can facilitate direct competition against the incumbents by legislating forms of neutrality. Net neutrality obviously comes to mind, but it isn't the only one. Pushing much further, licensing neutrality where copyright owners must license their works under equal terms to all companies, big and small.

-They can uniformize their laws a lot more. When it comes to IP laws, privacy laws, Europe isn't the 3rd largest "country" in the world, in fact they don't break into the top 15. To build products for Europe as a whole, you currently need an army of lawyers, because you're really still building for 28 individual countries, and that also favors large players over smaller ones.

Ultimately, coming back to my title, the behavior I'm seeing from Europe worries me a lot for the future. Europe is seeing itself as being non-competitive in Internet technologies, and as a result it plays a somewhat protectionist approach. However, that's also an isolationist approach, and isolating themselves from the state of the art isn't suddenly going to make Europe catch up in technology. Rather, Europe will fall even further behind as a result.
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Jon Franklin

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See who's in the lead!
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Vlad
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Have them in circles
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Jon Franklin

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NASA | SDO: Year 5: http://youtu.be/GSVv40M2aks
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Jon Franklin

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Vital to the building work!
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Hahahah glorious!!
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Jon Franklin

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This is amazing to watch. 
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excellent!!!
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Have them in circles
150 people
Claire Franklin.'s profile photo
Patrick Brendel's profile photo
Dexter Hartley's profile photo
Linda Hickman's profile photo
Ramesh Seetharaman's profile photo
Prof.iqbal Bukhari's profile photo
Neil deGrasse Tyson Fan Club's profile photo
Boni M Bo's profile photo
Marvel Movies's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Technology Specialist
Employment
  • Google
    2011 - present
  • United Business Media
    2009 - 2011
Story
Tagline
I bathe myself in tech. Technology Specialist at Google.
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Currently
London
Previously
Rugby
If you enjoy your steak beautifully cooked and served at epic speeds, there is no better option. Will definitely be returning.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
After recently living in a location overlooking the back entrance, I am able to see the extremely unhygienic conditions in which the Kosher Kingdom staff choose to handle their food before displaying them in store. I have also had food taken from me before purchase, later finding out that it had been partially eaten by rodents. After seeing first hand, how terrible the conditions can be, I now refuse to shop there again. For my friends, family and my own health.
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
4 reviews
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