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John Zaharick
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The Baltimore Science Fiction Society's Amateur Writing Contest opens today! For MD residents/college students who are 18 and over, submit your story of up to 5,500 words by June 19th, for NO FEE, for a chance to win $250, recognition at Capclave and Balticon, and other perks! Share with friends and family! 

http://bsfs.org/bsfsssc.htm
Science fiction, fantasy, space travel, contest, stories, writing
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The 2015 BSFS Amateur Writing Contest opens in less than a month!

http://www.bsfs.org/bsfsssc.htm

We are looking for speculative fiction in any category (Urban fantasy, hard science fiction, dark fantasy, etc.) from residents or students in Maryland.  The three winners will receive cash prizes and free attendance for Capclave 2015 and Balticon 2016!

The contest opens April 1 and runs until June 19.

2013's second place winner Rachel Kolar has had multiple publications since entering and earned membership in the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America after being inspired by the contest:

"Before I placed in the contest, I didn't really take myself seriously as a writer; writing was one of those things that I enjoyed and did when I got around to it, but I never went out of my way to make time for it and I didn't really think of myself as a writer. Placing in the contest, attending Capclave, and participating at Balticon changed all that. I take my writing much more seriously now. I think I've written as much in the past 18 months than in the preceding 5 years or so. I'm even about 40,000 words into the rough draft of a novel, which I don't think ever would have happened without getting the extra push for BSFS. You mentioned in the page for the original contest that you wanted to help amateurs reach the next level, and you absolutely did that for me." - Rachel Kolar
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Crowd funding for petunias that change color when watered with a dilute ethanol solution:
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/color-changing-flowers

#biotechnology   #GMO  #GMOplease
Beautiful flowers, amazing gardens, a whole new look at biotechnology. | Crowdfunding is a democratic way to support the fundraising needs of your community. Make a contribution today!
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By wearing goggles with video lenses and observing the world through a camera positioned outside the body, people have been able to induce minor out-of-body experiences when seeing themselves from the outside, or to feel as if they are inhabiting another person's body when the camera is attached to another's head.  People have had the experience of switching sex and race this way, but through robotics it's possible to have a completely alien experience (at least visually).

"Wells flies FPV, or First Person View. A camera attached to the drone sends a live video feed through to a screen or a pair of goggles on the ground, allowing the pilot to see what the drone sees. It’s the closest thing to one of those dreams in which you can fly. Your body is on the ground, but you are hovering above it."

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/fleshpilot-and-the-spiritual-vision-of-the-drone

#drones   #drones4good   #dronesforgood  
Jake Wells fell into a severe depression. His tricopter—and Jesus—saved him.
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"Be the higher dimensional Tesseract, bootstrapping humanity to a next level, space faring culture that you want to see in the world."

http://www.dailygrail.com/Essays/2015/1/finding-the-22nd-Century-HENRi-and-the-Non-Human-Space-Program

#singularity   #transhumanism   #future   #22ndCentury  
HENRi is an emotionally powerful short film, which explores human existence at the most fundamental, personal level—what it means to be a conscious individual. Hundreds of years in the future, a derelict spacecraft, controlled and powered by a human brain, floats aimlessly in the outer reaches ...
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The giant cannibals "speak" in a language of whole-body flashes that scientists are just now starting to understand.
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 Luis Vasquez's music has gotten really amazing.

The Soft Moon - Black

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iigmNuZRlqU
#postpunk   #darkwave   #industrial  
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John Zaharick

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Sex redefined - Escaping the binary prison

This collection of hard hitting snippets from an excellent Nature article worth reading in full makes clear how the societal boundaries between the sexes are beginning to break down under the weight of reality. Hopefully mainstream knowledge of work like this will ultimately help us move away from having to conform to expectations surrounding both sex and gender.  

As a staunch advocate of transhumanism I can draw a lot of inspiration from the LGBT community who is in many ways our advance guard. For decades they have been trying to establish the right to construe one's own identity instead of being forced into one of the two rigidly defined prefabricated package deals. They have done so in the face of enormous adversity which makes their perseverance especially admirable. Considering that the LGBT community has trouble getting the world to accept them for who they are, it's nigh impossible to imagine a world embracing people for who or what they want to be. If people are forced to make their case by explaining that they were born this way and thus don't have a choice, this does not bode well for the expanded cognitive and morphological rights transhumanism hopes to enshrine.

I can only hope that some day soon my home country of Belgium follows Germany's excellent example and will too introduce a third gender. It's rather infuriating that we currently lack both the common decency and the basic courtesy to implement even the barest minimum.


http://www.nature.com/news/sex-redefined-1.16943

As a clinical geneticist, Paul James is accustomed to discussing some of the most delicate issues with his patients. But in early 2010, he found himself having a particularly awkward conversation about sex.

A 46-year-old pregnant woman had visited his clinic at the Royal Melbourne Hospital in Australia to hear the results of an amniocentesis test to screen her baby's chromosomes for abnormalities. The baby was fine — but follow-up tests had revealed something astonishing about the mother. Her body was built of cells from two individuals, probably from twin embryos that had merged in her own mother's womb. And there was more. One set of cells carried two X chromosomes, the complement that typically makes a person female; the other had an X and a Y. Halfway through her fifth decade and pregnant with her third child, the woman learned for the first time that a large part of her body was chromosomally male.

doctors have long known that some people straddle the boundary — their sex chromosomes say one thing, but their gonads (ovaries or testes) or sexual anatomy say another. Parents of children with these kinds of conditions — known as intersex conditions — often face difficult decisions about whether to bring up their child as a boy or a girl. Some researchers now say that as many as 1 person in 100 has some form of DSD.

When genetics is taken into consideration, the boundary between the sexes becomes even blurrier. new technologies in DNA sequencing and cell biology are revealing that almost everyone is, to varying degrees, a patchwork of genetically distinct cells, some with a sex that might not match that of the rest of their body. Some studies even suggest that the sex of each cell drives its behaviour, through a complicated network of molecular interactions.

These discoveries do not sit well in a world in which sex is still defined in binary terms. Few legal systems allow for any ambiguity in biological sex, and a person's legal rights and social status can be heavily influenced by whether their birth certificate says male or female.

That the two sexes are physically different is obvious, but at the start of life, it is not. Five weeks into development, a human embryo has the potential to form both male and female anatomy. 

For many years, scientists believed that female development was the default programme, and that male development was actively switched on by the presence of a particular gene on the Y chromosome. In 1990, researchers made headlines when they uncovered the identity of this gene which they called SRY. Just by itself, this gene can switch the gonad from ovarian to testicular development. For example, XX individuals who carry a fragment of the Y chromosome that contains SRY develop as males.

By the turn of the millennium, however, the idea of femaleness being a passive default option had been toppled by the discovery of genes that actively promote ovarian development and suppress the testicular programme.

These discoveries have pointed to a complex process of sex determination, in which the identity of the gonad emerges from a contest between two opposing networks of gene activity. Changes in the activity or amounts of molecules (such as WNT4) in the networks can tip the balance towards or away from the sex seemingly spelled out by the chromosomes. “It has been, in a sense, a philosophical change in our way of looking at sex; that it's a balance,” 

Studies in mice suggest that the gonad teeters between being male and female throughout life, its identity requiring constant maintenance. In 2009, researchers reported deactivating an ovarian gene called Foxl2 in adult female mice; they found that the granulosa cells that support the development of eggs transformed into Sertoli cells, which support sperm development. Two years later, a separate team showed the opposite: that inactivating a gene called Dmrt1 could turn adult testicular cells into ovarian ones. “That was the big shock, the fact that it was going on post-natally,” says Vincent Harley, a geneticist who studies gonad development at the MIMR-PHI Institute for Medical Research in Melbourne.

Many people never discover their condition unless they seek help for infertility, or discover it through some other brush with medicine. Last year, for example, surgeons reported that they had been operating on a hernia in a man, when they discovered that he had a womb. The man was 70, and had fathered four children.

Studies of DSDs have shown that sex is no simple dichotomy. But things become even more complex when scientists zoom in to look at individual cells. The common assumption that every cell contains the same set of genes is untrue. Some people have mosaicism: they develop from a single fertilized egg but become a patchwork of cells with different genetic make-ups. This can happen when sex chromosomes are doled out unevenly between dividing cells during early embryonic development. 

Biologists may have been building a more nuanced view of sex, but society has yet to catch up. True, more than half a century of activism from members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community has softened social attitudes to sexual orientation and gender. Many societies are now comfortable with men and women crossing conventional societal boundaries in their choice of appearance, career and sexual partner. But when it comes to sex, there is still intense social pressure to conform to the binary model.

This pressure has meant that people born with clear DSDs often undergo surgery to 'normalize' their genitals. Such surgery is controversial because it is usually performed on babies, who are too young to consent, and risks assigning a sex at odds with the child's ultimate gender identity — their sense of their own gender. 

In most countries, it is legally impossible to be anything but male or female. Yet if biologists continue to show that sex is a spectrum, then society and state will have to grapple with the consequences, and work out where and how to draw the line. Many transgender and intersex activists dream of a world where a person's sex or gender is irrelevant. Although some governments are moving in this direction, Greenberg is pessimistic about the prospects of realizing this dream — in the United States, at least. “I think to get rid of gender markers altogether or to allow a third, indeterminate marker, is going to be difficult.”

So if the law requires that a person is male or female, should that sex be assigned by anatomy, hormones, cells or chromosomes, and what should be done if they clash? “My feeling is that since there is not one biological parameter that takes over every other parameter, at the end of the day, gender identity seems to be the most reasonable parameter,” says Vilain. In other words, if you want to know whether someone is male or female, it may be best just to ask.

http://www.nature.com/news/sex-redefined-1.16943


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sex
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intersex
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disorders_of_sex_development
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender_identity
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender_role
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Androgyny
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_gender

photo; Andreja Pejić

#ScienceSunday  | +ScienceSunday 
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John Zaharick

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I'm deeply fascinated by the effects of technology on human experience and how people intentionally alter their reality with tech, like using virtual reality gear to swap gender with another person or experience flight through the eyes of a drone.

Sarah's short story "A Stretch of Highway Two Lanes Wide" is about a man given a robotic arm who then obtains strange experiences from the new information entering his brain, specifically that he is the highway in the title.  It's a very original and insightful examination of transhumanism (as opposed to the "modified humans are frightening others" I usually see in fiction), and I definitely think it deserves the recognition it's gotten and should probably win a Nebula Award.
 
My story "A Stretch of Highway Two Lanes Wide" was nominated for a Nebula! 
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John Zaharick

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Patricia Piccinini's monstrously beautiful works

Piccinini was born in 1965 In Sierra Leone but moved to Australia in 1972 with her family. She initially studied economic history before enrolling at art school in Melbourne. Since 1991 her work has been exhibited around the world.

Piccinini works in a variety of media, including painting, sculpture, video, sound, installation and digital prints. She has an ambivalent attitude towards technology but enjoys exploring what she calls... the often specious distinctions between the artificial and the natural. She is keenly interested in how our changing understanding of these concepts will effect the further evolution of our society. Specific works have addressed concerns about biotechnology, such as gene therapy and ongoing research to map the human genome. She is also fascinated by the mechanisms of consumer culture. 

Probably one of my all-time favorite artists, each and every one of her works invites and rewards closer study. What at first sight appears shocking often reveals something surprisingly tender. Most of her work is very layered and can be interpreted in a multitude of ways. 

http://www.patriciapiccinini.net/

#ArtAndDesign  | #Art  | #Sculputure     
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John Zaharick

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Four-finned robot swims like a cuttlefish:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQG05uGTmzQ
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My story "Anthracite Weddings" is in the running for Best of the Year at Apex Magazine

http://www.apex-magazine.com/apex-magazine-story-of-the-year-2014/

#horror #darkfantasy
It's that time of year again. Time to vote on your favo…
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An ecologist studying small mammal dispersal of mycorrhizae and an author writing short stories.
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