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John Redden
Works at College of the Sequoias
Attended GCC, CSUN, UA
Lives in Visalia, CA
12,603 followers|8,819,174 views
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Ten opportunities to transform teaching and learning.
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John Redden

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Good points here... adaptive solutions add value.
courosa/Flickr As Chief Content Officer of a learning company, people frequently ask me: “Won’t all of your content eventually be free? After all, when technology enters the market, free is right behind it.” Then they’ll point to something like the music industry, where annual revenues have declined more than $20 billion from their peak over a…
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John Redden

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Awesome idea!
Liz Krane originally shared:
 
30 Days of Web Development
I'm at the start of a career change: I want to try doing freelance web development. I think. :) In any case, I need to get myself to actually make stuff so I figured I'd learn by creating a website or web app every day this month. Here's day 1: http://learningnerd.github.io/30DaysOfWebDev/day1/

Eh, it's better than nothing. I have to start somewhere. :) I was very much inspired by this similar project: http://jenniferdewalt.com/

To anyone who knows anything about web development: I'm all ears for any advice, inspiration, horror stories, cool links, anything you've got! :)
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to bookmark this, i am sharing it. :-)
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John Redden

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Competency based learning and the data that comes with it can allow us to iteratively improve the content. 
Learning and the related management systems have come a long way in the corporate world, especially in the past decade. These systems have typically focused on some of the enterprise related aspects of learning - for e.g., the ability to support hundreds of thousands of learners, provide compliance reports that date back in time and simplify the process of managing the To Do List and related tasks for a learner. As for the core aspect of the Lear...
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John Redden
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Technology  - 
 
A free worksheet and question generator that might be useful.  I really like the drag and drop user interface.
Welcome to Problem-Attic! Problem-Attic gives you access to more than 105000 questions from a variety of sources, all for free! Use the questions to easily create your own teaching materials, from tests and worksheets to flashcards and overheads. Overview; Select; Arrange; Format; Print ...
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Thanks a lot.It is really useful for Maths lovers.
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Actual research is hard and sometimes the results are hard to swallow.
Lessons from a handful of the most-viewed papers from the American Educational Research Association last year.
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John Redden

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This is interesting.
 
A new <i>Consumer Reports</i>-style review of instructional materials for K-8 math has found that 17 out of 20 series fail to fully align with the Common Core State Standards.
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John Redden

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ugh!
 
Drought in California - my home

The picture shows snow in the mountains of California, 2013 and 2014.  Snow usually provides 30% of California's water, so that was bad news.  But 2015 was much worse.

"We're not only setting a new low; we're completely obliterating the previous record," said the chief of the California Department of Water Resources.  There's now only 5% as much snow as the average over the last century!

California has been hit by new weather pattern: the Ridiculously Resilient Ridge.  It's a patch of high atmospheric pressure that sits over the far northeastern Pacific Ocean and stops winter storms from reaching California.  It's been sitting there most of the time for the last 3 winters. 

We did get 2 big storms this winter.  But the water fell mainly as rain rather than snow, because of record-breaking heat.  It was enough to half fill Shasta Lake and Lake Oroville.  But it didn't help the snow pack, which holds more water.

For the first time, the governor has imposed mandatory water restrictions: a 25% cut in water use in every city and town.   This will save about 1.8 cubic kilometers of water over the next 9 months - nearly as much as Lake Oroville now holds.

He said:

People should realize we're in a new era. The idea of your nice little green grass getting lots of water every day - that's going to be a thing of the past.

But what about agriculture?   In California, about 50% of water is used by "the environment": rivers, wetlands, parks and the like.  40% is used by agriculture.  10% is left for businesses and residents. 

Brown didn't impose any cuts on agriculture!  That sounds unfair, and people are complaining.   More water is used to grow walnuts than to keep Los Angeles going!

We definitely need to improve agriculture.  But don't forget: for the second year in a row, farmers in California's big Central Valley are getting hit with big water cutbacks.  The ones who get water from the State Water Project will receive only 20% of their usual amount.  

Is all this due to climate change?  I heard a wise answer to that question:  instead of a definite yes or no, just: this is what climate change looks like.  This is the kind of thing we can expect.

And on the Road to Paris, this week the US submitted a plan to cut carbon emissions by 25% by 2030... but that's another story.  Or another part of the same big story.

What California is doing about the drought:

http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-ag-water-20150403-story.html

Water used by agriculture in California:

http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2015/01/almonds-nuts-crazy-stats-charts

Make your own graphs of the California snowpack:

http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cdecapp/snowapp/swcchart.action

There's lots more water data here, too - click items on the menu above.

More on the Ridiculously Resilient Ridge or Triple R by Daniel Swain, the guy who coined the term:

http://www.weatherwest.com/archives/tag/ridiculously-resilient-ridge

In February he wrote:

In this sense, the Triple R of 2014-2015 is notably different from 2013-2014. California has certainly received more precipitation this year on a liquid equivalent basis, though we’re once again falling rapidly behind average as February turns out to be mostly dry. The extreme warmth and low snowpack, however, are very reminiscent of recent winters–as is the occurrence of infrequent but intense warm storms. It’s interesting to note that nearly the entire western United States has been exceptionally warm in recent months, while the eastern part of the country remains locked in a recurring nightmare of extreme Arctic outbreaks and almost inconceivable snow accumulations in parts of New England. This overall setup–with a big Western ridge and a deep Eastern trough–has become known as the “Warm West/Cool East” dipole pattern, and it has been a common feature of recent winters in North America. There are a number of hypotheses currently being investigated regarding the causes of an apparent recent increase in the occurrence of this pattern, though there’s not yet compelling evidence pointing to a singular cause (that’s a topic for a future blog post!).

What is more certain, at least as far as California is concerned, is that our severe long-term drought is unlikely to improve substantially until this newly-invigorated pattern of persistent West Coast high pressure is no longer dominant.
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John Redden

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Very good article here.
 
The Automation of the Publishing Industry

This is a new piece, a super in-depth look at the impact that automation has had on the publishing industry. There's lots of research in this one, as I dug into the actual impact that automation has had on newspaper, magazine and book publishers, as well as employment amongst writers, editors and other people in this industry. The results actually surprised me;  it's a more nuanced story than what I'd imagined. 

The other thing this piece does is look at what the automation of publishing is doing to the packaging of human knowledge, and how we are starting to see the early signs of a very new type of publishing, a wrapping of our information in a layer of artificial intelligence along the lines of Google Now and other virtual personal assistants. 

This piece was a lot of work and I'd like to get it to people in the publishing sector who might find it useful. If you know someone in that industry, and you find this piece interesting, please consider helping me get this to them. 

#automation   #publishing   #media   #ai  
An in-depth look at the automation of the publishing industry.
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Thanks very much, +John Redden. I really appreciate your passing this along. 
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John Redden

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Seems like it's all about DATA... storage, processing, and analytics.
 
Skills that may net you a $110,000+ job in the tech sector.

I'm guessing that most of this list will be completely foreign to readers in this space. Check it out. See how many of these skills/languages you recognize. 

http://venturebeat.com/2015/03/19/30-tech-skills-that-will-get-you-a-110000-plus-salary/
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The changing times are exciting.
 
I was honored to be the first guest on the pilot of new TV series called “The Future of Work,” created and hosted by +Katy Tynan. I got to talk about #contentstrategy , building an audience, and making the transition from employee to small business owner. #startups   #business  
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John Redden

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I like the idea of nanodegrees... something to work towards is a good idea.
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Merit badges is how I think of them.
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Education
  • GCC, CSUN, UA
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Professor of Mathematics, author, father of four, and education technology enthusiast.
Introduction
Professor of Mathematics at the College of the Sequoias in Visalia, California.  In addition, I have authored two Algebra textbooks and am the father of four. I enjoy computer science, technology, photography, and nonfiction.

Circle me on Google+:  www.google.com/+JohnRedden
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Educator, Author, Content Creator
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  • College of the Sequoias
    Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science, present
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Currently
Visalia, CA
Previously
Tujunga, Los Angeles, CA