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John Pearce
234 followers -
Author of Treasure of Saint-Lazare
Author of Treasure of Saint-Lazare

234 followers
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John Pearce's posts

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Opening Peter Steiner’s new novel The Capitalist was like visiting an old friend in his quaint Screen Shot 2016-02-18 at 9.41.57 PMcottage in the Loire — comfortable, relaxed (with a glass of good wine) and confident you’re about to hear a great story.

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Every serious writer should at least look at Scrivener. Its unmatched ability to reorganize manuscripts on the fly, plus its slick outlining interface, makes it easy to use and very productive.

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Last Stop: Paris Named Finalist in Shelf Unbound Competition for Best Indie Book

Last Stop: Paris by John Pearce has been honored as one of six finalists in the 2015 Shelf Unbound Competition for Best Indie Book. Held annually, the competition, hosted by Shelf Unbound magazine, receives about a thousand entries and is, according to publisher Margaret Brown, “a highly competitive field.”

“Last Stop: Paris exemplifies the best of independently published books and we are thrilled to spotlight it and include an interview with John Pearce in the December/January 2016 issue of Shelf Unbound magazine,” says Brown. You can read it at http://j.mp/1mMtvoI

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Last Stop: Paris a best-seller in France

The sequel to Treasure of Saint-Lazare has strong sales in both the U.S. and Europe. Yesterday it appeared on the Top 100 Kindle books in the "Action & Adventure" and "Suspense" categories in France.

It's "A full-throttle adventure through modern Europe and the Mediterranean in a book that’s part thriller, part mystery, and all rollicking ride," says Kirkus Reviews.

Last Stop: Paris is available in paperback, Kindle and audiobook editions at http://buff.ly/1NL2niR
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Introducing the Band-Aids of the Future - electrogel and electronics. From Smithsonian Magazine. http://j.mp/1QUCUHf

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"Great Sequel" - Another 5* review for Last Stop: Paris

Amazon reviewer CLM writes:

"I read the Treasure of Saint-Lazare shortly after it came out and I loved it. In my review I said I'd be interested in reading further into these characters. Mr. Pearce responded and said there would be a sequel, so every few months I'd check his page. I ordered this the day it came out and was not disappointed. It was like visiting old friends, catching up with Eddie, Aurelie, Icky and the rest. It was another suspenseful adventure figuring out who was out to get them and how to stop it. Khan is a pretty great nemesis, very cunning and intelligent. The connections between Eddie and Khan go back a long time. Overall, this was an excellent follow-up to the first novel. I'm not sure if this is the end of these characters or not - if so, it was a very satisfying ending. I'd recommend this to anyone who enjoys mystery/suspense - but start with Treaure of Saint-Lazare so you have the full picture.""

Thanks.

His review is here: http://j.mp/1QDiXmK

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A friend sends this along - there's no putting down the French spirit.
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“An exhilarating journey that will satisfy the most avid thriller reader” (Kirkus) Last Stop: Paris, the sequel to Treasure of Saint-Lazare, is available now for pre-order on Amazon, at a discount.  http://j.mp/210Vj8L
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Middle-aged white Americans are dying of despair

A study by two Princeton economists shows a startling change in demographics. Since about 1998, middle-aged white Americans of modest education are dying much earlier than they should be -- and much earlier than the equivalent cohorts of other countries.

Look at the chart in this story from The Atlantic. It will, and should, shock you.

What could be causing it? "Despair," says The Atlantic -- lack of societal support, lack of retirement support, massive inequality in incomes.

 It's worth noting that this group is the one most severely affected by the flattening of incomes over the last 20 years. They are trying to get by on basically the same, or less, money than they had two decades ago, as the share of corporate profits that used to go to the employees has been shifted to the shareholders and top management. And they don't have the public retirement assurance that every other western democracy offers -- their pensions and health insurance are still tied to their jobs, rather than to their citizenship.

Shame on us.

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