Profile

Cover photo
John Lieske
Works at Places
4,581 followers|1,181,645 views
AboutPosts

Stream

John Lieske

Shared publicly  - 
 
Note to Self: Buy Your Own Drinks When at a Party With This Guy
17
Darryl Barnes's profile photoJen Edwards's profile photoCaleb Varns's profile photoDavid Bowles's profile photo
27 comments
 
You held your own, brother. You held your own. Plus all the metal in your body neutralized Ian's death ray. That's badass in and of itself.
Add a comment...
 
Incompetence or Omnipotence? You Can't Be Both.
 
We spend a lot of money on our nation's security apparatus. Instead of long explanations, I'll just break it down to our largest intelligence spending basically consists of a blank check. Whether you agree or disagree, the basic reasoning for the blank check is the assumption that it pays for the best of the best.
 
If what Clapper is saying is accurate and that they never knew, the what the hell are we paying for? If what he's saying is the opposite of accurate (in other words, a lie), then why are we trusting this agency with so many resources to begin with? Trust is a big deal when it comes to intelligence and security, and this latest information is just more information bringing into question the usefulness of the security apparatus we've created over the past decade and a half. I'm not saying that it's a bad idea for our country to have in place an agency to collect intelligence, but more and more it's becoming clear that the agency we wanted isn't the same agency that we've received.
 
There's a catch to all this, you know.
 
For nearly a decade now, it's been a common mantra of some sources ( *cough* Fox News *cough* ) that the federal government is the single largest employer in the United States. Between intelligence and military contractors as well as direct NSA employees, the largest expense and employment by far comes from the very same apparatus that we're now finding has been spying on us in the name of our own security for at least a decade and a half.
 
We could cut the cord of spying and surveillance tomorrow. The unintended consequence would most likely be a near doubling of our unemployment numbers. There are probably things we could do to avoid this kind of result, but even that would cost money that we're currently spending on defense and intelligence.
 
So there's the problem: we spend X amount of a nearly unlimited budget on our intelligence and support for it; we could remove that apparatus, but it would cost Y and would require our government to admit it was spending X in the first place. Either way, government spending happens. Cutting spending without action is tantamount to economic suicide.
 
Welcome to the world of zero easy answers.
 
quote: Either one of two things happened: Bloomberg got screwed over by its sources, or the U.S. government is outright lying and clambering to save face with the already disgruntled public.

Clapper's response instead disclosed a seismic vulnerability in the intelligence agency's own mission, to "protect U.S. national security systems and to produce foreign signals intelligence information."
Summary: In admitting it didn't know about a massive security flaw in one of the Web's most used encryption libraries, the NSA inadvertently revealed a massive institutional failure.
6
Add a comment...
 
The challenge has been met and exploited. We have our answer:
 
Heartbleed Was Pretty Fucking Bad
 
How Bad Is Heartbleed?
 
Update: The Challenge Has Gone From NO to YES At The Link
 
Based on the assessments and theoretical dangers, it would seem like the flaw is catastrophic. The flaw has been sufficient fodder for tons of tech blogs and news sites to tell us just how much danger we're in. Those of us who work with Internet technologies have done our due diligence in patching our systems and recreating our certs.
 
+CloudFlare seems to want to test this vulnerability and is asking for someone to provide a proof that an exploit actually works. I'll be watching this closely, since it's relevant to my interests. So far there's been no success in demonstrating the vulnerability on CloudFlare's server.
 
https://www.cloudflarechallenge.com/heartbleed  
Anyone up for the challenge?
10
2
Mike Crosson's profile photoSteve Tarantola's profile photo
Add a comment...

John Lieske

Shared publicly  - 
 
How Bad Is Heartbleed?
 
Update: The Challenge Has Gone From NO to YES At The Link
 
Based on the assessments and theoretical dangers, it would seem like the flaw is catastrophic. The flaw has been sufficient fodder for tons of tech blogs and news sites to tell us just how much danger we're in. Those of us who work with Internet technologies have done our due diligence in patching our systems and recreating our certs.
 
+CloudFlare seems to want to test this vulnerability and is asking for someone to provide a proof that an exploit actually works. I'll be watching this closely, since it's relevant to my interests. So far there's been no success in demonstrating the vulnerability on CloudFlare's server.
 
https://www.cloudflarechallenge.com/heartbleed  
Anyone up for the challenge?
26
27
Ahron Darnell's profile photojeanny wati's profile photoRobin van Kekem's profile photoMorio Murase's profile photo
24 comments
 
+jeanny wati if you're not sure don't click the link in the email. Go to the site separately through your web browser. 
Add a comment...

John Lieske

Shared publicly  - 
 
Worried about sites you have a login that might be affected by Heartbleed? Got LastPass? Use this to check.
5
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
4,581 people
Hillary Beemer's profile photo

John Lieske

Shared publicly  - 
 
This is fascinating to watch, and +Denise Case provides several other interesting links that are worth reading as well.
 
We're still very early in the research, but the data so far seems to imply that we have a vast field of information just waiting to be discovered.
 
Mostly Microbe. Our microbes may be essential to our health - and our happiness.  For every human gene in our genome, there are 100 bacterial genes in our microbiome; in many ways we are "more microbe than human."   

5 minute video from +NPR offers a quick and engaging introduction to our invisible partners:
The Invisible Universe Of The Human Microbiome

+Lacerant Plainer's informative article on Our Microbial World:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+LacerantPlainerWrites/posts/dn3tBDhvApK

NY Times:  Some of My Best Friends are Germs
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/19/magazine/say-hello-to-the-100-trillion-bacteria-that-make-up-your-microbiome.html
(+Michael Pollan May 15, 2013)

Excerpt 1: Gut microbes may have a powerful influence on metabolism:

Justin Sonnenburg, a microbiologist at Stanford, suggests that we would do well to begin regarding the human body as “an elaborate vessel optimized for the growth and spread of our microbial inhabitants.” This humbling new way of thinking about the self has large implications for human and microbial health, which turn out to be inextricably linked. Disorders in our internal ecosystem — a loss of diversity, say, or a proliferation of the “wrong” kind of microbes — may predispose us to obesity and a whole range of chronic diseases, as well as some infections. “Fecal transplants,” which involve installing a healthy person’s microbiota into a sick person’s gut, have been shown to effectively treat an antibiotic-resistant intestinal pathogen named C. difficile, which kills 14,000 Americans each year. (Researchers use the word “microbiota” to refer to all the microbes in a community and “microbiome” to refer to their collective genes.) ... A similar experiment was performed recently on humans by researchers in the Netherlands: when the contents of a lean donor’s microbiota were transferred to the guts of male patients with metabolic syndrome, the researchers found striking improvements in the recipients’ sensitivity to insulin, an important marker for metabolic health. Somehow, the gut microbes were influencing the patients’ metabolisms.

Excerpt 2:  Thinking with your gut (microbes) :)

Our gut bacteria also play a role in the manufacture of substances like neurotransmitters (including serotonin); enzymes and vitamins (notably Bs and K) and other essential nutrients (including important amino acid and short-chain fatty acids); and a suite of other signaling molecules that talk to, and influence, the immune and the metabolic systems. Some of these compounds may play a role in regulating our stress levels and even temperament: when gut microbes from easygoing, adventurous mice are transplanted into the guts of anxious and timid mice, they become more adventurous. The expression “thinking with your gut” may contain a larger kernel of truth than we thought.

It's a Gut Feeling - how the gut microbota affects the state of mind:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1113/jphysiol.2013.270389/pdf

Gut microbiome-host interactions in health and disease:
http://genomemedicine.com/content/pdf/gm228.pdf
(Kinross et al. Genome Medicine 2011, 3:14)
See Figure 1 for a quick overview of some promising medical areas.

PharmacoMicrobiomics or How Bugs Modulate Drugs
http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2105-12-s7-a10.pdf

Nanotechnology and Learning to Talk to Bacteria:
Nanotechnology and learning to talk to bacteria: Reginald C. Farrow at TEDxNJIT
TEDx talk by 

HMP: NIH Human Microbiome Project 
http://hmpdacc.org/

Infographic:  A map of diversity in the human microbiome
https://bytebucket.org/nsegata/metaphlan/wiki/hmptree13_nl_bb.png

+Mark Bruce's SciTech Digest this week includes an entry for nanobots that can dynamically fold DNA sequences to deliver custom cellular payloads.  

"DNA Researchers have produced a variety of DNA Origami sequences that self-assemble into different nanorobots capable of interacting with biological substrates, and each other, while inside a living animal"

https://plus.google.com/+MarkBruce/posts/c2fAHw5nVWx

Happy #ScienceSunday  - the world is more amazing than we could have imagined. :)

#sciencesunday   #stemeducation   #genomics #medicine
6
2
Julien Dodokal's profile photoPkmmte Xeleon's profile photo
Add a comment...

John Lieske

Shared publicly  - 
 
A Lesson On Why Partisan Politics Leads To Bad Decisions
 
First, read: http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/04/11/nj-lawyers-call-for-constitutional-amendment-after-christies-questionable-judicial-picks/
 
Basic breakdown: The NJ governor has been a complete dick about reappointing judges in the state. In response, the state senators are thinking about changing judge positions into lifetime appointments.
 
Why It's Stupid: I get it, the state senate is trying to do the job that the governor is failing to do. The problem is that this is exactly why we separate branches of government. What's even more of a problem is lifetime appointments means waiting out stupid choices becomes way longer. A perfect example of this is the current Supreme Court of the United States-- there's tons of evidence that despite political leanings most SCOTUS judges are at least dedicated to balance, but at least one judge (Thomas) has been constantly accused of pretty egregious conflicts of interest ( http://goo.gl/k8QXH4 and http://goo.gl/xTK4E7 ). Other judges in the past have been accused of conflicts, and some removed from their seats, but the process is sufficiently difficult that the chances of removing a judge with a lifetime appointment are next to slim and quite nearly none.
 
So, to spite a governor who has been kind of a dick to his legislature and has a habit of being spitefully partisan when the consequences aren't catastrophic (so at least he's not a nihilist), the legislature is going to remove a check and a balance in place between branches.
 
If this doesn't sound immensely stupid to you, then partisan leanings might be in play. (or you're a lawyer hoping to be a judge someday)
 
I honestly do think that, whether conservative or liberal or whatever, most people really do want our system of governance to provide justice, freedom, and opportunity. But these occupations (and yeah, politics is an occupation instead of a service these days, it seems) have the same flaw that being chief officers and board members at a corporation have: they force people to sacrifice long term stability for short term brinkmanship. It's a shortsightedness that twists any ideals people have into a medium for idiots and hotheads to make stupid moves that make all of our lives worse.
 
I'm not saying that big changes in government always equals something bad. I'm saying that every time you see a big change proposed in politics, think about how that will affect us all when the other side has political control.
36
5
viruus g. m o's profile photoDyno Mike's profile photoAdel Alsabeeha's profile photoJason Bauman's profile photo
7 comments
 
+viruus g. m o good point
Add a comment...

John Lieske

Shared publicly  - 
 
Congrats to @AbrahamHanover and @JamesSACorey for this!
 
This is really great news and gives me something I definitely will watch on television. If you want to know more about what "The Expanse" is, here are some reviews of the books (with titles you can search for at your favorite bookseller):
 
https://www.goodreads.com/series/56399-expanse
5
Jeniffer Johnson's profile photoDaniele Vega's profile photo
2 comments
 
Awesome! Added to my "to read" shelf. 
Add a comment...
 
I don't know about democracy being broken, but I would say it's a great example of giving government a comments section. So far the petitions page along with change.org have been about as productive as reading the comments on YouTube.
 
Maybe I should go start a petition about it.
6
Add a comment...

John Lieske

Shared publicly  - 
 
Looks like +WIRED has put a patch in for heartbleed, and in the process broken links that were working just fine earlier.
 
Or they were broken. Now it looks like things are back to normal.
1
1
Omer Younus's profile photo
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
4,581 people
Hillary Beemer's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Director of Technology Development
Skills
Stuff
Employment
  • Places
    Employee, present
Story
Tagline
You Live and Learn. Or You Don't Live Long.
Introduction
Okay, I admit my tag line isn't original. Sorry to disappoint.
 
I may or may not be the droid you're looking for.
 
Things I Like:
  • Technology
  • Dogs
  • Science
  • Funny Stuff
  • Stuff that makes me think
  • Words
Things I Might Not Like:
  • This Space Reserved For Whatever I Feel Like Not Liking Today

I'm not a genius, but I know a lot of really smart people, some of whom may be geniuses. My hope is that it someday begins to rub off on me. I think I'm better for being lucky enough to know great people, because great people make me want to be better. I like to think I'm pretty okay right now, so maybe someday I can be awesome.
 
Gotta have goals, right?
 
I still haven't figured out what I want to be when I grow up, so I'm open to suggestions.
 

Bragging rights
I'm a better dog whisperer than the Dog Whisperer.
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
Johnny Software