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John Hummel
Works at U of Illinois
Attended U. of Minnesota
Lives in Urbana, IL
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John Hummel

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Yet another family values republican
Update, 4:30 p.m.: NBC News reports via a federal law enforcement official that Hastert's payments were made to a man with whom Hastert had "a sexual relationship" when the man attended the high school where Hastert taught from 1965 to 1981. Original post, 2:56 p.m.: The million-dollar payment that led...
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John Hummel

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Among the problems we could substantially ameliorate were it not for the vested political and economic interests of an elite, selfish and lethally short-sighted few

thanks, +Edward Morbius 
Edward Morbius originally shared to Horsemen:
 
"The most predictable disaster in the history of the human race"

...What happens when the world faces a lethal disease we're not used to, with a reproduction number of five or eight or 10? What if it starts in a megacity? What if, unlike Ebola, it's contagious before the patient is showing obvious symptoms?

Past experience isn't comforting. "If you look at the H1N1 flu in 2009," Klain says, "it had spread around the world before we even knew it existed."...

Gates's modelers found that about 50 times more people cross borders today than did so in 1918. And any new disease will cross those borders with them — and will do it before we necessarily even know there is a new disease. Remember what Ron Klain said: "If you look at the H1N1 flu in 2009, it had spread around the world before we even knew it existed."

Gates's model showed that a Spanish flu–like disease unleashed on the modern world would kill more than 33 million people in 250 days....

http://www.vox.com/2015/5/27/8660249/gates-flu-pandemic?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=voxdotcom&utm_content=wednesday
Bill Gates on what the world needs to learn from the 20th century’s "death chart."
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I look forward to having the opportunity to buy your book, +Edward Morbius!
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The ultimate con

thanks, +Godless 
 
I wouldn't be surprised if some believers are avoiding breaking free of their religion in part because it would involve having to admit being taken for such a long and costly ride.

~JD
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I think you're absolutely right, +Chris Conger. We have moved into Full Reaction Mode, largely ignoring the putting forth of our own agenda. Notable exceptions to this generalization include our remarkable recent success on the LGBT rights issue and the work of Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders. But otherwise, you're right (e.g., how much time does Obama spend worrying about republican reactions to x, y or z?). And you're right that it is fear working on us as well.
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John Hummel

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A glimpse inside ALEC

You are probably already aware of what ALEC is. But I, at least, was unaware of just how devious and pernicious their tactics are. Here's a snippet:

When trying to verify that with in-person reporting, Keefe was turned away and, in fact, "kicked out with the aid of off-duty police officers on orders from ALEC staff." But not before seeing Bethanne Cooley, Director of State Legislative Affairs for CTIA—the Wireless Association in the room—talking to Georgia Rep. Ben Harbin. Cooley is not a registered lobbyist in Georgia, but here she was working with that state's lawmakers. Under the auspices of ALEC, a non-profit educational 501(c)3, Cooley talking about or even actually writing legislation—which is what ALEC does—doesn't have to be reported as lobbying, and neither does the "scholarship" money they provide to legislators to travel to these meetings, or the food and drink and hotel costs that are covered. When the station tried an open records request to get receipts and reimbursement records for legislators' travel to ALEC-sponsored events, they were denied. [emphasis mine]

That's right: They use off-duty cops as thugs and they get around the law by declaring themselves to be an educational organization.

Orwellian, much?
An Atlanta, Georgia television station has made national news with its fantastic ...
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Yes, there are always fevered imaginations, +G Kochanski, and like you I am always extremely leery of conspiracy theories. But as the saying goes, "Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get you." Some of them, including ALEC, are out to get us. ('Tis an interesting problem in induction to figure out which crazy theories out there are just crazy and which are crazy because they reflect a crazy reality.)
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thanks, +Armando Lioss 
 
In their effort to make it seem like everyone's against them, they've become their own worst enemy. There's nothing "Christian" about the Republican party.
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Since money is god, maybe they are right.
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Paul, I'm going to disagree with you here. I think having accountability is a good thing, and that people should know how their elected officials are voting. I understand your point, but believe that transparency is better than secrecy, as there is no guarantee a politician isn't just pandering to the masses to get elected then voting the exact opposite way once their in there. 
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+John Hummel yes, exactly. Has that stopped smoking? Or has contribution to the black market and hijacking trucks due to high taxes made the situation better?

Keeping it legal and regulated and then charging a smokers premium to insurance rates or even better the tax on cigarettes is used to treat smoking related costs would be far less stressful for all concerned. Instead you chaotic justification for haphazard attempts at linking actions to consequences. 
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Nothing changes because the rich don't want anything to change

(Things are working just fine for them, thankyouverymuch.) And, of course, they are in charge.

thanks, +Susan Stone 
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True, +Hudson Child, and especially of late, that is largely by design: Recent republican efforts to make voting more difficult (requiring ID, restricting voting days, restricting polling locations, restricting absentee voting, etc.) are aimed specifically at making it more difficult for the poor.
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On the truth behind school "reform"

Blaming teachers is good for profit and power.

thanks, +Jennifer Freeman 
 
Before getting to the big news, let’s review the dominant fairy tale: As embodied by New York City’s major education announcement this weekend, the “reform” fantasy pretends that a lack of teacher “accountability” is the major education problem and somehow wholly writes family economics out of the story (amazingly, this fantasy persists even in a place like the Big Apple where economic inequality is particularly crushing). That key — and deliberate — omission serves myriad political interests.

It's not about reform. It's about providing taxpayer money to political cronies. 
Poor schools underperform largely because of economic forces, not because teachers have it too easy
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In their defense, it is much harder to enslave the educated populous +John Hummel​. 
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In his circles
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24,702 people
MRKG 37's profile photo
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Work
Occupation
Professor
Employment
  • U of Illinois
    Prof. of Psychology, 2005 - present
  • UCLA
    Prof. of Psychology, 1991 - 2005
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Urbana, IL
Previously
Los Angeles, CA - Minneapolis, MN - Fredericksburg, VA - Annandale, VA - Culver City, CA - Bloomington, IN - Greensboro, NC
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not amused
Introduction
Professor of cognitive psychology at the University of Illinois.
Bragging rights
To a computer scientist, I look like a neuroscientist. To a neuroscientist, I look like a psychologist. To a psychologist, I look like a computer scientist. Evading responsibility like a master.
Education
  • U. of Minnesota
    PhD, Experimental Psychology, 1986 - 1990
  • U. of Mary Washington
    BS, Experimental Psychology, 1982 - 1986
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Gender
Male