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John E Adams
17,538 followers -
but it's not like that; I never knew nothing about no Mississippi. - Buddy Guy
but it's not like that; I never knew nothing about no Mississippi. - Buddy Guy

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1939 Alfa Romeo 8C 2900B Lungo Spider

In the 1930’s, the 8C 2900 Alfa was not a mere sports car but was the most advanced, modern and compelling sports car money could buy. Milan’s own Carrozzeria Touring patented the ‘Superleggera’ construction which coincided with the birth of Alfa Romeo’s masterpiece. Approximately 32 of the 2.9 chassis were made and it is believed only 12 are Touring Spiders, seven of which are the long chassis like this car.

This car’s known history starts in 1949. In February 1949 it was raced in Sao Paulo by amateur driver Mario Tavares Leite who had the car imported from Italy to Brazil. Mario won races with the car in 1949 and 1950 after which the car disappeared. Later it had a Corvette engine installed and the chassis was modified. It is possible this car traveled to Brazil from Argentina in the mid-to-late 1950s without the Touring body and with the Corvette V-8 only to be reunited with the original Touring coachwork some four decades later.

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1965 Bultaco M16 Matador
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1938 Talbot-Lago T-23 Teardrop Coupe

This 1938 Talbot-Lago Type 23 with body work by Figoni and Falaschi became the prototype and first production model of the Teardrop Coupe. The T23 Model rides on a 116 inch wheelbase and 4-liter six cylinder engine producing 115 horsepower with a Wilson four-speed pre-selector gearbox. This Talbot-Lago “Coupe Royal” is the only 9220 style Tear Drop to be built on the T23 chassis and was the prototype to the subsequent run of T-150 SS Tear drops. It is also the only Tear Drop to be equipped with exposed Marchal headlamps. A previous owner initiated a restoration in the early 1960’s which resulted in a partial disassembly but which was never completed. The current owners acquired the car in 1998 and commissioned a restoration to original condition.

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1933 Delage B8S

This 1933 Delage D8S Roadster with coach work by DeVillars was the star of the 1934 Paris Auto Salon. Delage sold the car for over 100,000 francs (approximately $20,000) It has a 130-inch wheelbase and four-liter push rod overhead valve straight eight producing 145 bph @ 145 rpm. The engineering team designed a new military aircraft engine and the D8S carburetor was an aviation type to avoid icing, surrounded by heated oil. The cable operated brakes, unusual for the period, are vacuum assisted. Some unique details are a jack mounted to the steering box, a handy wrench attached to the fuel pump and the head lamps have diffuser lines worked into the silver-plated bowls. The first owner was Alejandro Lerroux, Prime Minister of Spain. It was passed through the Lerroux family and then to the Gran Hotel Velasquez in Madrid. This is the original white color scheme. The frame is white, the brake drums and steering wheel are white and the instruments on the chrome trimmed dashboard are white faced.
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1939 Triumph Speed Twin

The Speed Twin is a motorcycle that was made by Triumph at their Coventry, and later Meriden factories. Edward Turner, Triumph’s Chief Designer and Managing Director, launched the Triumph Speed Twin at the 1937 National Motorcycle Show. It was a 500 cc OHV vertical twin in a lightweight frame and the first truly successful British parallel twin, setting the standard for many twins to follow. After World War II the Speed Twin was responsible for the survival of Triumph - and every major British marque offered a 500 cc twin designed on similar lines to the Speed Twin.

Edward Turner’s Triumph twin was a major turning point for the British motorcycle industry, as although a 500 cc parallel twin of medium capacity was not revolutionary, the 5T Speed Twin model was lighter than many contemporary singles with significantly more power and torque. Its performance proved exemplary for a road-going 500, better than 100mph being attainable under favorable conditions. Early models were only available in 'Amaranth red' with hand painted gold pinstripes to set off the chrome.

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1923 Duesenberg A Roadster with Rumble Seat

The eight cylinder Duesenberg Model A was introduced in 1922. It was the first production car bearing the Duesenberg name. The Model A features an inline, eight-cylinder engine with a single overhead camshaft. The engine develops 100 horsepower and has a displacement of 259.7 c.i. The advertised top speed was 90 miles per hour and was fitted with 4-wheel hydraulic brakes adapted from their race cars. This 1923 Model A Duesenberg features a roadster body that was built by the coach building firm of Millspaugh & Irish. It sold new for $6,850 and was one of the most expensive American vehicles of the period. Slightly more than 600 Model A Duesenberg’s were built.

#Duesenberg

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1969 Bultaco El Tigre

Among the rarest of all Bultaco the El Tigre is the only scrambler style bike the factory ever offered, it was available only in the US and for just one year, 1969.

Though based mechanically on Bultaco’s road oriented Metralla the El Tigre used many ,model specific components. The resulting lack of availability of parts makes restorations very challenging and as a result there are probably only a handful of show quality El Tigres left in the county.
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1931 Harley Davidson VL74

1931 was the first year for the VL model, a twin-flathead which was one of the most popular touring bikes Harley ever produced. It was designed to replace the pocket-valve engine in the Model J they had been building since 1911. Soon considered reliable and sleek the VL 74 captured the imagination of motorcyclists worldwide and established new standards for the industry.

They ended up producing 4 models, the V was the standard, the VL had a higher compression engine, the VS was geared for sidecar work, and the VC had cast iron pistons for the 3-wheeled Servi-Car.
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