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John Costigan
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Attended Virginia Tech
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John Costigan

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I'm not generally a zombie guy, but I just heard this song on Google Play Music Radio, and while I realize I'm nearly a decade late to the party, I still thought it was pretty funny.  Especially since I heard it at the office. ;)
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Hi☺
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Auto Enthusiasts Community Rules and Guidelines

This community is popular, and as with any large society, a set of rules can help us all coexist more peacefully.  Please abide by these rules.  Moderators have been appointed and are authorized to remove comments, posts, or members (either temporarily or permanently) for egregious or repeated violations.

While some of these rules may be helpful in contexts outside the community, moderators inside this community are only empowered to enforce them within this community.  In particular, moderators are not authorized to take action in the community based solely on behavior observed outside the community.

1. Be respectful.  Everyone has opinions.  You're welcome to debate and argue, so long as you remain civil.  I know that's a lot to ask on the internet, but please help me prove to the world that it's possible. :)

2. Stay on topic.  The topic, in case you don't know, is automobiles.  Not politics.  Not religion.  Certainly not Get Rich Quick schemes.  (Trucks and motorcycles are okay.)

3. Abide by copyright and Fair Use law.  Don't blatantly copy content without adding your own commentary.  Link to your source(s), especially in the case of images.  If the source is you, then give yourself the credit.

4. If your comment or post is automatically flagged/removed, please don't appeal to a moderator to approve it.  With apologies, there are simply too many flagged posts for moderators to spend their time reviewing them.  Instead, consider reformulating your content in such a way that it isn't automatically flagged.

5. If your comment or post is manually flagged, and it's not obvious why, then the moderator who flagged it should provide an explanation.  In that case, you are welcome to appeal to the moderator who flagged it.

6. Post high-quality content.  I realize that this rule is subjective, but we have so many members and get so much content, and everyone benefits if we can avoid (e.g.) low-resolution images, duplicate posts, posts with little or no commentary, or multiple small posts when a combined post would be better (think 5 separate image posts vs. 1 album post).

7. If you witness a moderator violating these rules or abusing their power, please report the behavior to the community owner (+John Costigan), with a link as evidence.  Abuse by moderators will not be tolerated.
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John Costigan
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Help Me Moderate

This community is huge.  Google+ does an okay job of automatically flagging many abusive posts, but with the number of posts created in this community, there are bound to be a number of false positives and false negatives.

So I'm looking for a few brave souls to help me keep this place in order.  I have some ideas of what makes a good moderator (active, respectful, non-confrontational), but rather than make appointments, I'm asking you all to choose your own.

Rules

1. First, review existing nominations and add +1's to comments where you agree with the nomination.  You may +1 a nomination for yourself.

2. After reviewing existing nominations, you may nominate other members (not yourself) by +-mentioning them in the comments below.  Optionally, you may include a short supporting argument - no more than 20 words.  See my sample below.  Please add a separate comment for each nomination; i.e. one nomination per comment.

3. Do not add comments that aren't original nominations.  That includes comments inviting others to nominate or vote for yourself or someone else.

4. After some period of time, I will appoint moderators based on nominations, votes, and brief (private) interviews.

5. I reserve the rights to (a) remove comments that violate these rules; and (b) add more rules as necessary.
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No offense to those whose comments were deleted, but I've cleaned up this thread to lock down the number of nominees.  You can still vote on those already nominated.

Thanks to all the nominees and to all those who submitted nominations.  I'll be promoting new moderators soon.

John Costigan

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Other than the hyperbolic title, this article is spot on. Separation of church and state doesn't grant you the right to violate law on behalf of your religious beliefs. If it did, this would be a much scarier world.
Kim Davis’s supporters are protesting what they believe to be an affront to her religious freedom. Credit Photo by Ty Wright/Getty
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wait so is she a christian?? 
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Congratulations, San Francisco Giants! :)

Saving Bumgarner for the 7th game was wise.  Making him the "relief" was brilliant.  Well done, Bumgarner!

Why isn't this a more prominent strategy in MLB?  "Starter" stats are over-rated....
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The "Highlights" feature is my favorite; I love being able to--for example--see expected delivery dates on packages without even having to open the email.
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please send me invitation for inbox
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iOS 6 Passbook vs. Google Wallet

I googled "Google Wallet vs Apple Pay" to figure out how the latter improves on the former, which I've been using for years. (Anonymity seems to be the main benefit.)

This old article from 2012 showed up, and it's a pretty funny read in light of yesterday's Apple Pay announcement. :)

I wonder what changed Apple's mind....
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The iPhone uses a secure element which is what Google initially used - until it became apparent how easy it was to trigger the self destruct on the secure element rendering it useless, and as it is built into the phone - the only fix is a new phone. If you didn't unlink Google Wallet from the secure element before doing a factory reset, when you tried to use Google wallet again, the secure element would fry itself. Google learned their lesson and moved to Hosted Card Emulation. I hope Apple has thought this through.....
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John Costigan

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Can't go. Can't stop. What can I do!?
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The best one is in Kansas city it say black history museum with ⬅pointed the same direction on both signs right next to each other and the other sign says county corrections facilities lmao not making up
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Should I upgrade my Windows 7 PC to Windows 10?

It's "free" for me, but from what I've read, the major advantages of Windows 10 over Windows 7 are drawn from Windows 8, specifically those relating to touch input.

I don't use touch input on my desktop.  It doesn't even have touch input.  And I don't use Cortana; and I won't use Edge.

So... is there any reason that I should upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 10?
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i have windows 7 and i love it. i wouldn't upgrade.
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I agree completely with Susan.

It's an interesting coincidence (I hope) that this measles fiasco occurred in the same week as the poll about how public views (on climate change, GMOs, etc.) differ from those of scientists[1].  Of course, the percentage of people who think vaccines are bad is (thankfully!) lower than that of people who think GMOs are bad, but there's still a parallel: a surprisingly-nonzero number of people think they're smarter than scientists with years of formal training.

[1] http://www.nbcnews.com/science/science-news/survey-shows-scientists-public-odds-over-climate-gmos-more-n296231
 
I wasn't going to weigh in (because I'm a passive-aggressive non-confrontational coward ;)) but just in case there are still people on the fence and trying to decide for their kids and for themselves, I wanted to at least offer my POV. I could say that my 8 years in graduate school and 2 degrees and 14 years spent in public health give me a certain amount of background on this topic, but I'd rather speak as a mom of two little ones.

Infectious disease used to be the number one cause of death in the entire world. It was the advent of vaccinations and antibiotics (along with improved sanitation) that made them fade from the industrialized, 1st world (keep in mind that infectious disease still runs rampant in 3rd world nations). I keep hearing that people want "proof" that vaccines work. We have historical records for hundreds of years of devastating infectious disease outbreaks (Black Death, anyone? 1918 flu epidemic? Small pox??), and we have documented proof that those numbers have been dramatically decreased since vaccines became available and routine. We eradicated smallpox. Besides landing on the moon, this is possibly mankind's most amazing achievement. We eradicated (completely wiped-out) the existence of one of the most infectious and greatest killers to humans with the use of vaccines. Just 30-40 years ago, we were on the verge of eradicating measles as well. So measles is just a rash and a high temp and runny nose, you say? During the last run of unchecked measles epidemics in the mid 20th century, it also had a death rate of 20% in many areas that were affected. That's 1 in every 5 children, dead.

The vaccines have adverse side effects/events? Yes, sometimes they do. But the number of children who are affected by serious adverse events (serious side-effects like those that are caused by measles: deafness, brain swelling, death, disability) are very rare. You know someone whose child had a serious reaction to a vaccine? You've read about someone's child who had a serious reaction to a vaccine? Yes, it does happen. Consider how many people vaccinate their children though - how many of those numerous vaccinated children then had serious side effects? It is a very, very small number. In epidemiology (my field for the last 14 years), we call this a risk-to-benefit ratio. The risk, although life-changing and devastating to the families that are affected, actually affect a very, very small percentage of the entire public. But we as a society no longer see the benefit, and I think that's the crux of the problem.

We no longer see children in iron lungs or paralyzed due to polio. We no longer see children born with severe birth defects because moms were exposed to rubella (German measles) while pregnant. We no longer see body counts in the thousands due to childhood deaths from measles, mumps, whooping cough, or rotavirus. You want to be a cautious vaccinator and delay Hep A and Hep B vaccines? I hear you. I understand that. You question whether to give your child the HPV vaccine? Okay, I can understand that (although HPV is highly common/prevalent in the population and increases your odds of cancer). But for the love of all that is good in this world, do not decide against vaccinations of preventable childhood, infectious diseases. Because not only is that irresponsible towards your own child, that is negligent and unethical towards the children of others who cannot receive the vaccine (because they are babies and simply too young, or immune-compromised, or allergic to the ingredients).

You want to argue that it's a big ploy between CDC/WHO and big-pharma to put toxic chemicals in your children for profit? I assume that you do not abstain from antibiotics if your child has a major ear infection? Or you have over-the-counter drugs like ibuprofen and Tylenol for high fevers? Vaccines are not a big-profit generator for big pharma. They would rather sell you something that comes in a pill that you will have to take for the rest of your life. One or two doses in your lifetime is a pretty small financial venture for them. Also, most vaccines are already around - there's not much drug discovery and profit to be made there. Viagra on the other hand, or Ambien or Prozac . . . blockbusters. If you can trust antibiotics and over the counter treatments, if you can let your child play on grass that has been treated by pesticides, or pools/waterparks that have been cleaned with chlorine, or brush your teeth with fluoride toothpaste . . . don't pick and choose your science based on a handful of "doctors who disagree" or cherry-picked websites about the dangers of vaccines. Choose peer-reviewed publications like Nature or Science, New England Journal of Medicine or the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). Or choose to believe the medical establishment and your doctors, the CDC or WHO or NIH.

My last argument will be this, and the one that I hope carries the most weight: I vaccinate my own children. So does my pediatrician and all of my friends in medicine and public health. If these vaccines really were as poisonous as you may fear or those blogs may claim, why in the world would we "poison" our own children? Surely if there is anyone we are going to protect first, it would be our own kids. Or maybe we are all ignorant and stupid? That may be, but we went to the same schools as the people who built the roof over your head and the car that you drive and the plane that you travel in. You can choose to trust that humans are innately good and believe in our collective talents at developing advanced technologies, or you can believe that it's all a conspiracy aimed at harming children (why?? there's no profit in that, really). I believe in the good in people, and I believe in a personal and professional responsibility to try to help others. Trust me, no one goes into public health for the money.

I love my children as much as you love yours, I will bet on that any day. I vaccinate my children for their safety, as well as for yours. I would do it for you. You should seriously consider why you won't do it for their sake or for mine.
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I agree with you, Ryan - there is a lot of misinformation on both sides of many issues, and the result is confusion in the public. I mentioned GMOs because it was the largest discrepancy between scientists and the public, but there are a LOT of other examples listed in that article, including a smaller discrepancy (12% vs. 30%) regarding vaccines.

In rebuttal to your (probably true) assertion, however, the poll suggests that the majority (63%) of the public thinks it is unsafe to eat (not grow) GMOs, as compared with scientists (12%). I have little doubt that the result would be different if that question had read "grow" instead of "eat," but that is orthogonal to the study I linked.
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Okay, finally.  Android L = LOLLIPOP

But wow, the Nexus 6 is huge.  I had been hoping for a smaller Nexus option - I like being able to use my phone with just one hand.  I guess I can stick with my good ol' Nexus 5....

(Who am I kidding?  I can't resist the latest and greatest.)
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You can't wait for a circular one?  (You just know Gen-2 will be circular.)  Or do you actually prefer a rectangular watch?
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Amen.

The only problem with manual transmissions is figuring out how to make them work with hybrid drivetrains, i.e. those that can take full advantage of the low-end torque provided by an electric motor.

For example: is it possible to give the BMW i8 a clutch?
Save the Manuals! The official home for the Car and Driver Save the Manuals campaign. Join the cause, share stories and photos, and find out how to get involved!
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Education
  • Virginia Tech
    M.S., Computer Science and Applications, 2001 - 2003
  • Virginia Tech
    B.S., Computer Science, 1999 - 2002
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Other names
gnuite
Story
Tagline
Maemo Mapper creator gone Google
Introduction
Known online as gnuite, I am a Software Engineer by trade, currently working for Google in Mountain View, CA. I have a B.S. and M.S. in Computer Science from Virginia Tech, with a concentration in Information Visualization. I began my full-time-professional career at Argon ST in Northern Virginia (since acquired by Boeing), but relocated across the country to California to work with Google and enjoy free lunches.

In addition to my professional work as a Software Engineer at Google, I also harbor a passion for software as a hobby, in the form of Free and Open Source Software. For example, I am the founder of open source software Maemo Mapper, one of the first projects that made its home in the Maemo GarageMaemo is an open-source embedded operating system targeted at internet tablet devices.

I am happily married to the beautiful Kristin Costigan, a.k.a. Kristin Von Kundra.

Disclaimer: I work for Google, but I do not speak for Google in any official capacity.  My thoughts in Google+ or elsewhere do not necessarily reflect those of Google or its affiliates.
Work
Occupation
Software Engineer
Employment
  • Google
    Senior Software Engineer, 2008 - present
  • Argon ST
    Software Engineer, 2003 - 2008
  • SAIC
    Junior Software Engineer, 2002 - 2003
  • Virginia Tech
    Undergraduate/Graduate Researcher, 2001 - 2003
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Currently
Sunnyvale, CA
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Mountain View, CA - Fayetteville, North Carolina - Fort Kobbe, Panama - Novato, California - Lavaca, Arkansas - De Ridder, Louisiana - Burke, Virginia - Centreville, Virginia
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