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John Cook
Works at Singular Value Consulting
Attended University of Texas at Austin
Lives in Houston, TX
28,476 followers|5,374,721 views
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John Cook

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A grapheme is visually one character, but may be made up of several characters in a file.
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Do they also make them using the Scotch Tape Method?


(Sorry, the physicist-punster in me just couldn't hold back.)
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Dome of the Stone Chapel at Lanier Theological Library. The chapel is a reconstruction of a church built in Turkey around 500.
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"Almost all current descriptions of the fundamental laws of the universe can be viewed as deep generalizations of Maxwell’s equations. Even more surprising is that these equations and their generalizations have led to some of the most important mathematical discoveries of the past thirty years. It seems that the mathematics behind Maxwell’s equations is endless." -- Thomas Garrity, introduction to E&M for Mathematicians.
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+John Cook Thanks John.  That's what I thought might be the case.  Now I'll buy it.
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Science and technology reporting: Reading the difficulties in the 1885 Scientific American
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:) By coincidence, someone asked me yesterday about my website of Scientific American covers. Which led me to rediscover my Scientific American weeklies collection. This particular weekly is in there:
http://chesswanks.com/SAW/1885-06-06.pdf
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Presented without comment
“Austin, TX takes a bold stance on the programming language wars.”
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ha!  (Btw, I actually live on Haskell now, just a few blocks from this sign :D)
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When a company thrives despite bad service and incompetent employees, they’re doing something right that isn’t obvious.
When a company thrives despite bad service and incompetent employees, they're doing something right that isn't obvious
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And a friend's observation quite some time ago.   All companies are incompetent in most areas.  They succeed despite this general incompetence because of some specific area of competence.

I also see some companies as having stumbled (through skill or luck) into a good situation.  Sometimes enduring, sometimes not.  See David Ricardo and his lamentations about all the good farmland being taken (as I recall).
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Have him in circles
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Oil on a parking lot this morning
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Hope you have not slipped
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The golden ratio is the limit of the sequence of roots below.

Proof: Let x be the right hand side of the equation. Then x^2 = 1 + x, and x> 0, so x = (1 + √ 5)/2, the golden ratio.
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This is simple and elegant but does not constitute proof unless you show independently that the limit indeed exists
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Sometimes a graph looks wiggly because it's actually quite flat. This isn't much of a paradox; the resolution is quite simple. A graph may look wiggly because
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Some people disdain simple solutions just because they're simple.
When people sneer at a technology for being too easy to use, it's worth trying out.
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One of the originators of category theory (forget his name, now) once described categories and functors as "easy mathematics made difficult".  But he insisted it was for a good reason that people would eventually realise!  (Memory of a seminar I attended back in the '70s.)
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It's natural to evaluate clinical trial designs by how often they select the BEST dose, but it's more reasonable to ask how often they find a GOOD dose.
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Got a fractal in our vegetable co-op basket this morning.
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It is certainly not photoshopped. Although the first time I saw it in real life I felt like in XKCD 331. Even if I knew this thing exists. 
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Have him in circles
28,476 people
Bhupinder Singh Anand's profile photo
Joe Sanchez's profile photo
nowon / binary thinking's profile photo
Greg Wigs's profile photo
Toby Tableau's profile photo
James Davis's profile photo
Jonathan Adkins's profile photo
Jitendra Gupta's profile photo
Stephan Paukner's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Applied mathematician
Skills
Mathematical modeling, Bayesian statistics, software design, writing clear prose
Employment
  • Singular Value Consulting
    Owner, 2013 - present
    I've consulted for some of the world's largest software and biotech companies, as well as for law firms and smaller companies.
  • M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
    Research Statistician, 2000 - 2013
    Bayesian statistics, clinical trial design, simulation, software project management
  • NanoSoft
    Senior consultant
    Desktop, web, and mobile software development
  • Western Atlas
    Software developer
    Desktop software development, digital signal processing
  • Vanderbilt University
    Assistant professor
    Research in nonlinear partial differential equations and modelling
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Houston, TX
Previously
Texarkana, TX - Nashville, TN - Austin, TX - Washington, DC
Contact Information
Work
Phone
(832) 422-8646
Story
Tagline
Connector
Introduction
I solve problems by making connections.

I work as a consultant, bringing together the experience I gained from my previous careers as a math professor, programmer, manager, and statistician. I enjoy combining ideas to solve problems and see the solutions carried out.

You can find out more about my work here.
Education
  • University of Texas at Austin
    Ph. D. in Mathematics
Basic Information
Gender
Male