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John Callery
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129 followers
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Can natural language processing be used to predict US Supreme Court outcomes? +Chris Nasrallah has done some interesting work on this:

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Analytics can help us understand our employees as well as we understand our own customers. This article suggests that asking "What should we predict?" rather than simply "What can we predict?" is often just as important. I'd suggest that communicating well and building trust with employees and leaders can help make the gap between "can" and "should" quite small...

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Podcast for the day: +Ford Motor Company's "Data Science Leader", +Michael Cavaretta, talks connected cars, dealer recommendation systems and hadoop (interview starts 18 minutes in). +GigaOM 

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This is a good look at an areas that can use a lot more focus on analytics, though I'm not sure why we're considered 'scary'... :-)

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Really great work on extracting value from old and challenging data sets, plus finding ways to create/combine new data to come up with some interesting conclusions.

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Great projects like this help support the need for open data initiatives.

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Catchy headline, but it sounds like more of a case of "maturing" and "focusing" than "shrinking" to me...

"In the case of Big Data, this probably means less focus on back-end technologies like new types of storage or database frameworks, and a rethinking about how best to integrate human knowledge, algorithms and diverse sets of data."

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Interesting look at 'closed' data sets and the implications for privacy, accuracy and peer review inside the walls of 'corporate science'. +WIRED 

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+The Economist is having an interesting debate on cities' use of data and what value it can provide.

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Nice viz of TLDs
Geography of Top-Level Domain names.
This graphic maps a combination of generic top-level domains (gTLDs) and country code top-level domains (ccTLDs) in order to provide an indication of the total number of domain registrations in every country worldwide.

All gTLDs are mapped through an analysis of information returned by the WHOIS Internet protocol, that provides contact information for any given domain. For instance, this meant that for every .com domain name, the location registered in that domain’s WHOIS data was retrieved and stored in a database.

#domainnames   #map   #infographic  
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