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John Bartram
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John Bartram

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Wonderful work.
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that is a beautiful blade.. some serious craftmanship. 
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John Bartram

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We need C14 dating, both absolute and relative, for multiple samples and by multiple laboratories, for Christian, Chrestian, Gnostic and Manichaean sacred texts.
This fragment is virtually unique, in being found within a secure, archaeological layer. When I credulously believed in a "Jesus Christ" appearing in the New Testament, I was most concerned in dating the early codices (and f...
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Radiocarbon dating found the manuscript to be at least 1,370 years old, making it among the earliest in existence.
These tests provide a range of dates, showing that, with a probability of more than 95%, the parchment was from between 568 and 645.
"According to Muslim tradition, the Prophet Muhammad received the revelations that form the Koran, the scripture of Islam, between the years 610 and 632, the year of his death."
Prof Thomas says the dating of the Birmingham folios would mean it was quite possible that the person who had written them would have been alive at the time of the Prophet Muhammad.

Now we have to consider what this may mean.
What could be the world's oldest fragments of the Koran have been found by the University of Birmingham.
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Yes +John Bartram , your thesis is enormous and powerful . They could not help but fear your ideas.
What you brought new to me was the idea of the creation of the Christian out an assemblage of various religions , for political gain.

They are standing on sand if they cannot present documents with references to the Christ earlier than the eighth century . It seems to be a fight they are bound to lose .
It reminds me of the various Shrouds of Turin which , no matter how carefully examined they might be , seem be immune to scientific study.
Because they have to be , else the truth with show itself.
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The manuscripts of Classical Antiquity were collected and copied by Alquin and succeeding generations of monks. Where are the originals - the manuscripts that were supposedly copied - now?
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* Great steaming gorillas.. I may have the next best seller on my hands that will outpace the Da Vinci code comedy.....must start writing..wish I had studied more.....
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More on the messiah(s) at Qumran in the early-first century.
This unprovenanced, limestone tablet was likely found near the Dead Sea some time around the year 2000 and has been associated with the same community which created the Dead Sea scrolls. Israel Knohl, an expert in Talmudic an...
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John Bartram

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Help wanted and deserved.
 
Now with the added incentive of two free ebooks. :) All donors to the cause of the just... well, me being able to have a working computer, will get a free copy of my current ebook, Hinterland, as well as copy of my second collection, Sing Along With the Sad Song, which is due out this autumn.  
My name is A (W) Hendry and I'm just starting out in my writing career. I have had a couple of stories accepted for publication and have put out a wee ebook collection on Amazon Kindle. Unfortunately the ancient clockwork computer I was using has finally given up the ghost -it is an ex computer,...
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John Bartram

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Rafique Jairazbhoy - whom I was fortunate to call a friend in the late 1960s - tried to convince me of such archaeology (for Oriental, pre-Columban contact) ; I kept an open mind. But I think that this field is slowly coming to agree with him.

Ancient Egyptians and Chinese in America
(Old World origins of American civilisation) 29 Apr 1974
by R.A. Jairazbhoy (Author)
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ancient-Egyptians-Chinese-American-civilisation/dp/090400001X/ref=sr_1_2/277-7790769-9895938?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1429198764&sr=1-2

Resources for R. A. Jairazbhoy
http://trove.nla.gov.au/people/1280133?c=people

#archaeology #history #Americas #Alaska
Bronze artifacts discovered in a 1,000-year-old house at the Rising Whale site suggest trade was occurring between East Asia and the New World centuries before the voyages of Christopher Columbus.
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Yes, of course +John Bartram . I got distracted by words like Thule and Inuit, and pictured a system of trade through the north between hunting groups and tribes, not necessarily needing large or complex shipping methods.
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John Bartram

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Post-Doc Openings in Dyson Robotics Lab and Robot Vision Group at Imperial College

We are currently looking for excellent computer vision / robotics post-doc researchers to fill two open positions. One is a Dyson Fellow position in  the Dyson Robotics Lab at Imperial College, focusing on using vision to open up new horizons in home robotics. The other is a post-doc position in my Robot Vision Group working on the PAMELA/SLAMBench project which is investigating the future of high performance real-time vision and SLAM algorithms and how these developments can interact with and drive other trends in computing and processors.

Here are links to the adverts with full details on how to apply:
http://www.imperial.ac.uk/dyson-robotics-lab/work-with-us/join-the-team/dyson-post-doctoral-research-fellow/
https://www4.ad.ic.ac.uk/OA_HTML/OA.jsp?page=/oracle/apps/irc/candidateSelfService/webui/VisVacDispPG&akRegionApplicationId=821&transactionid=22904502&retainAM=Y&addBreadCrumb=S&p_svid=46784&p_spid=1732220&oapc=17&oas=s867UCb-nxuFCCEHF7roSA

Please feel free to contact me with informal enquiries if you need more information

(Sorry for the obviously posed photo of me and the guys... "Researchers laughing with camera" reminds me a bit of "Women laughing with salad" http://womenlaughingalonewithsalad.tumblr.com/ :) )
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A study shows how experts don't know nearly as much about this as they claim.

#history   #papyri   #gospels   #scholarship
P. Chester Beatty I, (P45) folio 13-14, containing portion of the Gospel of Luke For all the years, decades - centuries in some cases - scholars have studied manuscripts claimed as 'early-Christian', they have managed to lear...
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John Bartram

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So no suggestions as to what happened to these many manuscripts, or if they were not destroyed, where they might be now. A pity and I will try to make this my last post here on the subject.

As I leave the topic, I will add two suggestions:
1. The many purported copies made from the 8th century and onwards include fake histories, such as all the anti-heresies, national histories for their Dark Ages (e.g. Gildas), and Church histories (e.g. Eusebius of Caesarea). Let me make this clear: Alquin & co. did not just copy, they also revised and faked.
2. There are two strong possibilities for where the manuscripts are, assuming the Church did not destroy them:
a. The monasteries where they were copied.
b. The Vatican.

I've discussed before the Abbey of St Gall and how it played an important role in making the Christian textual tradition. It's history has this episode:

In the fourteenth century Humanists were allowed to take away some of the rarest of the classical manuscripts and in the sixteenth the abbey was raided by the Calvinists, who scattered many of the most valuable books.
("Abbey of St. Gall". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 1913.)

If they really were taken, then where to - and where now? Does this account have historicity, or is it a cover?
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+most diggity and +John Bartram excellent leads , thank you.
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Image: my (Canadian) father aged 21 in 1935, just before sailing to his new life in England.
I remember him with great fondness. He never spoke to me harshly and as I moved through adult life, I realised how much of the wisdom he passed on to me was good and useful.
Happy Father's Day to you all.
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Lovely thoughts !
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The historical, Jewish messiah at the Qumran monastic community of observant Jews seems to me to be the single-most critical factor in the conflict which included the three Jewish-Roman Wars. The alterations to the Book of Baruch lead, I think, to the first gospel account(s).
"The Pierced Messiah Text" The War of the Messiah is a series of Dead Sea scroll fragments describing the conclusion of a battle led by the Leader of the Congregation. The fragments that make up this document include 4Q285, ...
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The more I study the materials in your Google Drive, John, the stronger appears the case that the messiah of the New Testament is derived from, but different to the Jewish messiah of the Dead Sea Scrolls, and this reworking began early, perhaps after the end of the First Jewish-Roman War.

BOOK OF BARUCH: Date of Second Part.
Kneucker, Marshall, and several other recent critics, however, place its composition after the capture of Jerusalem by Titus, holding that the "strange nation" of iv. 3 ("give not thine honor . . . to a strange nation") refers to the Christians, and relates to a time when the antagonism between Judaism and Christianity had become pronounced.

As the enemies of the Jewish messiah are Chrestian, rather than Christian, we see here the start of the gospel Chrestology.
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Shovelbum
Lived and worked across the world, including western Europe and various Mediterranean islands, West Africa, the Far East and Polynesia. Best for history and archaeology: Malta.
Been on television many times as both presenter and interviewee.
Started archaeology in Cambridge, late 60s, and now entering retirement in my 60s. I enjoyed getting my hands dirty.
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Don't get me started.
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geophysical surveying, archaeological excavation, writing
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