Profile

Cover photo
John Bartram
820 followers|397,404 views
AboutPosts

Stream

Pinned
 
Some here kindly suggested that I look to Charlemagne as the founder of Christianity; I have now concluded that this is correct; the originator of the idea and the executioner of the grand design - with royal authority - is Alcuin of York.

#history #religion 
Carolingian Manuscript, c. 831, Rabanus Maurus (left), with Alcuin (middle), dedicating his work to Archbishop Odgar of Mainz (right) Having revealed how from the early-first century there was a religion termed Chrestianity ...
12
2
John Bartram's profile photoGnotic Pasta's profile photoOnze Plumes's profile photoMatthew Collins's profile photo
23 comments
 
Excellent! I know i for one will be looking forward to it.  Best of luck John. I don't have much to offer in the way of help, but if you think of anything, please don't hesitate to contact me. 
Add a comment...

John Bartram

commented on a post on Blogger.
Shared publicly  - 
 
See also my G+ posts:
Julia Crispina, Daughter of Berenicianus:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+JohnBartram/posts/f2f6P4uVAN2
Catacomb of Priscilla: https://plus.google.com/116463024107790571846/posts/KSvBghf1tPc
The Grapte Palace: https://plus.google.com/116463024107790571846/posts/5AWspw2q1F3

This woman plays an important role in early Chrestianity.
The Church of England consecrates today its first female bishop, the Reverend Libby Lane, in a ceremony at York Minster. The Established Church in England thinks this is new; archaeology long ago revealed the first bishop to ...
4
Add a comment...

John Bartram

Shared publicly  - 
 
Did the idea come from nowhere, or from what people believed at the time? I prefer the anthropological approach.
Paulina in the temple of Isis, by Fortunino Matania; based on the account by Josephus In our secular world, we know that there was no Virgin Mary, so from where did the idea come? From the beliefs and rituals of the time. I o...
6
Add a comment...
 
Alexander the Great is known to have been buried in Egypt.
Untrue: there is only one contemporaneous source for his existence - the astrological diary found in Babylon; the rest comes centuries later, when Alexander was become divine.

A contemporary account of the death of Alexander
http://www.livius.org/aj-al/alexander/alexander_t41.html

#alexanderthegreat   #history   #mythology  
9
John Bartram's profile photoWarren Lissel's profile photo
10 comments
 
Good luck and happy hunting. :-)
Add a comment...

John Bartram

Introductions & Personal Stories  - 
 
Many thanks for the invitation, which I am glad to accept.
The link I added below is to the latest subject I added to my site, which I hope some will find interesting.
My study, broadly, is how people conjured 'divine men' into existence in antiquity, and although this covers all the world's major religions, the focus of this site is Christianity. I use archaeological artefacts and the archaeological method, which produce results rather different to those in our history books.
Personally, I regard religion as superstition, dependent on a belief in the supernatural; I reject such as approach and I argue for universities to detach themselves from their schools of theology and divinity.
10
The Royal Fool - Sigmun Lloyd's profile photoChris Humphreys's profile photoJohn Bartram's profile photo
4 comments
 
Then I hope to not disappoint, +Chris Humphreys.
Add a comment...

John Bartram

Shared publicly  - 
 
The dreaded lurgy laid me low for quite a while, but I hope to post again soon.
The Vyne Ring or the Ring of Silvianus is a gold ring, dating probably from the 4th century, discovered in a ploughed field near Silchester, in Hampshire, England, in 1785. Originally the property of a British Roman called Si...
5
Ergun Çoruh's profile photoJohn Bartram's profile photoDirk Puehl's profile photo
5 comments
 
Tell me... but I think I have developed at least a vestige of resistance against the bacili from Emma's kindergarden. I have a few ladies with toddlers in my team at work though... well, don't ask :-) - but thank you, John, I hope that my little tales could help to pass the time a bit when you were laid low.
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
820 people
Gonos Topografia's profile photo
Terence Christian's profile photo
David Knuth's profile photo
Bruce Harry's profile photo
Stacie Riggin's profile photo
Rene Nieuwenhuizen's profile photo
Matt Caruana's profile photo
Britani Kessler's profile photo
Peter Roopnarine's profile photo

John Bartram

Shared publicly  - 
 
Archaeologists can be just as keen to echo the New Testament and false textual tradition as most historians. Here we look at what really was and is going on with the name Nazareth.
Samson and Lions, Rome 350-400 CE. He was to be a Nazirite from birth. Though we've seen repeatedly how there was neither a Jesus Christ, nor Christianity until well into the medieval period, and how the gospels (canonical et...
6
Add a comment...
 
How I think I'm right to point the finger at Alcuin for he seems to have begun the Christian textual tradition, as 'Chrest' is changed to 'Christ'.

#history   #Carolingian   #Christianity   #Chrestos   #Charlemage   #iconoclasts   #historicity   #archaeology  
Codex Sinaiticus is regarded as one of the oldest versions of the New Testament; it - like all the texts mis-termed early-Christian - made no mention of Jesus Christ, or Christian/Christianity; we now know they are Chrestian,...
9
Philo stratus's profile photoJohn Bartram's profile photoDirk Puehl's profile photo
14 comments
 
I'm quite an Eco-fancier, you know +Philo stratus ... and the "Name of the Rose" is... speaking of multi-layered... one of the most complex and allusion-rich texts I've ever read (besides "Foucault's Pendulum"...) and, as you say, after all is said and done, truth, whatever that is, might be stranger than fiction indeed. 
Add a comment...

John Bartram

commented on a post on Blogger.
Shared publicly  - 
 
+Haleh Brooks I hope you find this interesting and I would most appreciate learning your expert opinion on this.
  Golden larnax and the golden grave crown of Philip II of Macedon. Vergina (a small town in northern Greece) became internationally famous in 1977 as the burial site of the kings of Macedon, including the tomb of Philip II...
9
Add a comment...

John Bartram

Shared publicly  - 
 
The syncretisms of Iran and Egypt, Greece and both Iran and Egypt, then Rome and both Greece and Egypt; with Alexander the god king at their centre as an exemplar.
10
Antony Jackson's profile photoJohn Bartram's profile photo
6 comments
 
+Antony Jackson: I agree totally with your comment (two above) on how the divine men of the imperial period used Alexander as a type.
For the archaeology, I must stand my ground - in none of the battlefields traditionally associated with Alexander (and none of the numerous cities named for him) has any archaeology been found which can be identified as either his, or directly related to him. He belongs almost completely - if not entirely - to a textual tradition of the Roman imperial period.
Add a comment...
 
Conclusion: One may question the basis for the repeated, academic claim that "vivas in deo" is a sure indicator of Christianity, as reported by the BBC. The answer is simply that the UK is not a secular state and its institutions, such as the BBC, English Heritage, the British Museum and its great universities are all pillars of the Christian Church. Proper archaeological interpretation cannot begin until at least the disestablishment of the Church, along with all education (universities and schools) becoming secular. If that were to happen, centuries of misinterpretation would need to be undone.

#archaeology #history  #earlychristianity  
Numerous artefacts have been discovered by archaeologists and others, bearing an inscription as invocation to "live with God", an expression and sentiment found in the New Testament. It is likely Chrestian and part of a Greek Magic spell.
10
Add a comment...

John Bartram

Shared publicly  - 
 
BBC 6 July 2014
Files which may be linked to child abuse claims seem to have been lost "on an industrial scale" at the Home Office, the chairman of the Commons home affairs select committee has said. The Home Office has said its own review last year found that 114 potentially relevant files could not be located.

Lord Tebbit said he hoped any inquiry would be conducted quickly.
The former Tory minister and party chairman also said there may have been a political cover-up of abuse in the 1980s.
He told the Andrew Marr programme: "At that time most people would have thought that the establishment, the system, was to be protected.
"And if a few things had gone wrong here and there that it was more important to protect the system than to delve too far into them.
"That view was wrong then and it has spectacularly shown to have been wrong because the abuses have grown."
Lord Tebbit added that "it was the thing that people did at that time, you didn't talk about those sort of things".
5
John Bartram's profile photoMarguerita Farrell's profile photo
5 comments
 
+John Bartram true that, can't argue there (darn as the arguments with interesting minds are always fun, oh well, such is life ;)
thanks for the chat, have a great remainder of the day ;)
Add a comment...
People
Have them in circles
820 people
Gonos Topografia's profile photo
Terence Christian's profile photo
David Knuth's profile photo
Bruce Harry's profile photo
Stacie Riggin's profile photo
Rene Nieuwenhuizen's profile photo
Matt Caruana's profile photo
Britani Kessler's profile photo
Peter Roopnarine's profile photo
Links
Contributor to
Story
Tagline
Studying cultural layers
Introduction
Shovelbum
Lived and worked across the world, including western Europe and various Mediterranean islands, West Africa, the Far East and Polynesia. Best for history and archaeology: Malta.
Been on television many times as both presenter and interviewee.
Started archaeology in Cambridge, late 60s, and now entering retirement in my 60s. I enjoyed getting my hands dirty.
Bragging rights
Don't get me started.
Work
Skills
geophysical surveying, archaeological excavation, writing
Employment
  • Archaeology, present