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John Arrington Woodward
Attended Florida State University
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John Arrington Woodward

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+Sam Harris clearly comes off poorly in this exchange (though I appreciate his honesty in putting it up for all to see). Most of his responses begin with decrying the 'tone' from Chomsky rather than leaving that imagined tone (this is an email exchange) to the side and sticking with addressing the issues.

Chomsky's argument is most powerful when he addresses the question of whether violence with the intent to help is essentially different than violence with the intent to harm. Harris gets lost in a moralist argument rather than recognizing that 'the intent to help' is laden with its own nationalist overtones that border on supremacist. 
 
A pretty amazing internet cat-fight.

April 30, 2015
From: Noam Chomsky
To: Sam Harris

Very glad to see that we are terminating this interesting non-interchange with a large measure of agreement.
Sam Harris and Noam Chomsky attempt to have a conversation about the ethics of war, terrorism, state surveillance, and related topics--and fail.
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+John Arrington Woodward his honesty is a result of the delusions he carries of himself which knows no bounds. He added a postscript that basically acknowledges that he misrepresented Chomsky, but very very narrowly -- again pure ego once you read between the lines.
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Pop culture colonizes the imagination. 
 ·  Translate
Le dessin d'un moine qui ressemble beaucoup au maître Jedi a été retrouvé dans un manuscrit par un conservateur de la British Library.
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Via +Boris Borcic

See his statement that this is evidence against Friedman's 'flat earth' thesis.
 
"Neodymium is no rarer than copper or nickel and quite evenly distributed throughout the world's crust. While China produces 90% of the global market's neodymium, only 30% of the world's deposits are located there. Arguably, what makes it, and cerium, scarce enough to be profitable are the hugely hazardous and toxic process needed to extract them from ore and to refine them into usable products. For example, cerium is extracted by crushing mineral mixtures and dissolving them in sulphuric and nitric acid, and this has to be done on a huge industrial scale, resulting in a vast amount of poisonous waste as a byproduct. It could be argued that China's dominance of the rare earth market is less about geology and far more about the country's willingness to take an environmental hit that other nations shy away from."

The neodymium and cerium used in tech products start in mines in Inner Mongolia, the province of northern China that borders Mongolia, such as the Bayan Obo mines just north of Baotou. Then they are processed in Baotou, and the "tailings," the toxic waste, are dumped in a "tailings pond", a big toxic lake.
Hidden in an unknown corner of Inner Mongolia is a toxic, nightmarish lake created by our thirst for smartphones, consumer gadgets and green tech, discovers Tim Maughan.
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Bukowski arrests murderer with Gertrude tattooed on his neck. Isn't that from one of his books?
Authorities: Chicago police captured Kamron Taylor -- a convicted murderer who'd overpowered a jail guard and escaped days earlier -- after a 5-block chase.
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Josh Blackman provides some clarity on the Indiana law. Yes, it is similar to the federal law. But there seem to be some clear distinctions. 1) it would seem to almost specifically punish progressive cities and towns in Indiana (such as South Bend) that have ordinances preventing discrimination based on sexual orientation; 2) it clarifies some potential vagueness when dealing with the federal law, i.e. whether the federal government must be a party in the case or if it also applies to private persons--the Indiana law makes sure these protections apply to all corporations and private individuals.

The comments are just as (if not more) interesting and cogent than the blog post (mostly written by legal wonks).

In the end, Blackman indicates that this is not immunity or a blank check for discrimination. I would hesitate to say that, especially given the publishing of the law. That atmosphere is there for the license to discriminate, a license which may be more in the heads of the bigots than not. And proving discrimination seems to have been made more difficult in the post-Pence era.
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+Jay Gordon I'm hesitant to blame the mainstream gay rights groups for all of this, especially the corporatization of the American society, the gutting of the American economy by oligarchic neo-industrialists, the decline of public housing and welfare assistance, or the criminalization of being black. They may have had a hand in supporting much of this. But so have we all--willingly or not.

I'm always sympathetic to pragmatism in the face of horror. It may not be the best road to take, but given the need for anti-discrimination in late capitalism, it would seem the only options are pitchforks and baguettes or using the market forces against the establishment, i.e. immanent change over transcendent change.
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Some excellent resources for fans of Tartovsky. I had no idea about the conflict between Bresson and Tartovsky at the '83 Cannes festival.

The Mirror is still one if my favorite films. Though, as with most geniuses, it is hard to rank his films in any 'better-than' format. Perhaps as important as his own work has been his influence on such current masters as Nuri Bilge Ceylan, whose Once Upon a Time in Anatolia is transcendent. 
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John Arrington Woodward

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I don't agree with the conclusion of this article. Wes Anderson's 'violence' has the 'raw emotional pain' of Godard's dead policeman in Breathless. 
Conversation about Wes Anderson tends to be confined to a few shopworn talking points: his symmetrical compositions, his manicured dialogue, his whimsical sensibilities. Less discussed, but more interesting, is the curious undercurrent of violence that courses through his work—those moments when his impeccably appointed worlds collapse and something more brutal,...
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" Pensioners are seven times a lot of seemingly to develop dangerous carcinoma than they were within the 1970’s, in step with Cancer analysis Britain "

In case you may not be aware of what "a lot of seemingly" might mean, think of synonyms for each. Someone apparently used a translation program or the very dangerous dictionary to translate this into English.
Pensioners are seven times a lot of seemingly to develop dangerous carcinoma than they were within the 1970's, in step with Cancer analysis Britain, that blames the rise on the increase of low cost package holidays and therefore the desirability of a tanned look. Figures collected by the charity ...
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Fresh out of the oven. Bread porn
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I'm done.
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" We live at a time when it is more crucial than ever to believe that the university is both a public trust and social good. At best, it is a critical institution infused with the promise of cultivating intellectual insight, the imagination, inquisitiveness, risk-taking, social responsibility and the struggle for justice. In addition, higher education should be at the “heart of intense public discourse, passionate learning, and vocal citizen involvement in the issues of the times.” Underlying this vision of the university are some serious questions about its relationship to the larger society. For instance, how might the university’s responsibility be understood with respect to safeguarding the interests of young people at a time of violence and war, the rise of a rampant anti-intellectualism, a devastating gap in income and wealth, the rise of the surveillance state, and the threat of ecological and nuclear devastation? What might it mean to define the university as a pedagogical space that disrupts, disturbs, inspires and energizes young people to be individual and social agents rather than as an institution that redefines itself in terms of market values and reacts mostly to market fluctuations? It is in the spirit of such considerations that I first want to address those larger economic, social and cultural interests produced largely by the growing inequalities in wealth, income and power that threaten the notion of higher education as a democratic public good. "

I was present for the keynote, and it was pitch perfect. Giroux encapsulates the moral hazards of corporatized higher education, directed by EdDs whose research is the definition of paucity.

The focus, even in public institutions, on maximizing 'profits' (or balancing budgets on the backs of the students and faculty) is only the symptom of the deep moral hazard. It is the cough that signals the cancer within. And that cancer of 'metrics' erodes the ideals of the institution, ideals that cannot be expressed in the standard metrics of testing but is only demonstrable in qualitative analysis--and even then not so much. How could one 'measure' the importance of the university during the social movements of the sixties? The aids crises of the 80s? Etc?
Higher education is defined more and more as simply another core element of corporate power and culture, viewed mostly as a waste of taxpayers’ money, and denied its value as a democratic public sphere and guardian of public values. - 2015/03/21
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It turns out that reading is not the culprit of my slight myopia, lack of sunlight is. Struggles of the (recovering) night owl...
 
The myopia boom: Short-sightedness is reaching epidemic proportions

East Asia has been gripped by an unprecedented rise in myopia, also known as short-sightedness. Sixty years ago, 10–20% of the Chinese population was short-sighted. Today, up to 90% of teenagers and young adults are. In Seoul, a whopping 96.5% of 19-year-old men are short-sighted.

#shortsightedness  
#myopia  
Short-sightedness is reaching epidemic proportions. Some scientists think they have found a reason why.
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  • Florida State University
    2010
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I am union. I am pastafarian. Our creation story will one day be told in schools next to creationism.
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*Notice*: this account is *not* verified. I am not the real me. 

If you know me, then you know me. Otherwise, I'm a socialist (as is every American who has ever driven on a highway) and progressive. I also have a lovely family, enjoy European films, science fiction, and, well, pretty much anything 'literary'. 

I'm also a would be member of the Missionary Church of Kopimism. Join now, or you will not go to where ever you may really want to go. http://kopimistsamfundet.se/english/

I speak French and German.

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I had the Brisket Dip, which was very good. The brisket has a heavy, smoky flavor, a bit salty, but the salt is nicely countered by caramelized onions and a sweet sauce. The dip was standard, canned, deli fair and, while very salty, not bad in combination with the brisket. However, the serving was very small for what I paid. It was served on a standard hamburger bun (store bought quality) with perhaps six slices of brisket (which, since the bun was so small, was about right). It was perhaps perfect for a lunch serving, but this was dinner. There were a small handful of fries that were relatively fresh, but not enough to counter the minuscule portion of meat. The service was okay. It did take a bit too long to get the food, but the server was capable, though not terribly convivial. The kicker was the bill. Not only was it more expensive (for less food!) than the excellent Metro Diner and, indeed, any similar restaurant, but there was also a small extra charge. It is called the ACA Surcharge. It amounted to a piddly 1%, so I'm not outraged at the cost. I'm outraged at the politics. The ACA surcharge, it turns out, is a charge added on to every costumer's bill to counter the increased costs of giving the workers healthcare. I'm fine with paying the extra. I'm also NOT a big fan of the ACA. But to play politics with your customers is, frankly, ridiculous and stupid. It makes the whole meal feel like a sales pitch. Half of the population was just spit on by the owner. I left feeling dirty. I'll not be returning to Gator's again (not that it's a big loss). I'm hopeful the owners feel comfortable with their politics. But, if I want to go to a political rally, I'll head to the nearest park and watch the loons. I've no interest in supporting someone so crass and gauche as to behave in this fashion.
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