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Johannes Schindelin
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Reposting my response to this comment: http://sarah.thesharps.us/2015/10/05/closing-a-door/#comment-148420

Willy, I think you’ve hit upon the exact spot where I and most of the senior Linux kernel developers disagree. I believe you can be technically brutal without being personally brutal and still get your message through. In fact, most times, your explanation of the issues will be clearer, because you’ll focus on expressing what they did wrong, rather than your own emotions.

As for your comments about the emotional mapping of Europeans to what they say, we will have to respectfully disagree. If you saying “I wish someone would kill you” is equivalent to feeling disappointment over someone’s skills as a maintainer, that mapping is just broken.

http://marc.info/?l=linux-arm-kernel&m=137877061404509&w=2

What do you say when you’re past disappointment into anger at a larger broken system? Well, in Linus’ case, it seems that he slips into homophobic slurs. That means he thinks that being gay is worse than being dead. What kind of message does that send LGBTQ developers who want to get involved with your kernel community? (I almost said “our community” there but it’s no longer my community.)

The most frustrating thing for me is that as a woman, I don’t get to participate in the same skewed emotional spectrum without harming myself professionally. I have had other kernel developers imply that I’m being “too emotional” and that I should “calm down” when I raise my voice even in the slightest. Women are socially trained to care about the community around them and other people’s feelings, and they get called nasty sexist slurs when they don’t have empathy.

From reading articles and talking to other minorities, they also feel the awful double standard here. Black men and women get labeled as violent or deviant when they speak in anger. Or get shot by police if they attempt to assert their rights. If they express anger at a system that oppresses them, they get told to pay attention to white men’s feelings. They can’t win.

When you say Europeans have a habit of exaggerating their emotions, to the point of tearing down other people, what minorities hear is “I have the privilege to not be able to care about other people’s emotions."

I would highly recommend checking out Scalzi’s post on privilege, “Straight White Male: The Lowest Difficulty Setting There Is”. It explains privilege with as gaming metaphor that I think most people can connect to.

http://whatever.scalzi.com/2012/05/15/straight-white-male-the-lowest-difficulty-setting-there-is/


Yep, it's true, I am working for Microsoft now! http://thread.gmane.org/gmane.comp.version-control.git/277194

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Too true!

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Today the ImageJ team is proud to announce a new public release candidate for ImageJ2: version 2.0.0-rc-11. This release contains several critical bug-fixes as well as new features, including tracking of anonymous usage statistics, as well as Groovy scripting support.

For details, see the News post on the ImageJ web site at:
    http://imagej.net/2014-08-08_-_ImageJ_2.0.0-rc-11_released

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+Jan Nieuwenhuizen I always meant to ask you: is there comprehensive documentation how LilyPond achieves the layout? Even after having hacked on it for a while, the unholy mix between seven languages (C++, Scheme, Python, PostScript, TeX, Shell, XML, not to mention LilyPond's language itself, ohloh lists even more: http://www.ohloh.net/p/lilypond/analyses/latest/languages_summary) makes it pretty obscure to understand.

I would actually only be interested in the layout algorithm itself...

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I wonder how many Ubuntu freezes it will take me yet to finally realize that ext4 is good only for corrupting my beautiful Git repositories by truncating random files to 0 bytes.

ReiserFS never did that to me.

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This maybe perhaps the smallest oldest surviving ecosystem in the world. A garden in a bottle, planted by David Latimer in 1960 was last watered in the year 1972 before it was tightly sealed. David Latimer, 80, from Cranleigh in Surrey wanted to experiment how long the ecosystem will survive and to everybody’s amazement the little world is still thriving entirely on recycled air, nutrients and water.
 The only external thing fed to this bottled-garden was light without which there would be no energy for plants inside to create their own food and continue to grow. Other than that this is an entirely self-sufficient ecosystem, with the plant and bacteria in the soil working together.
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