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Joel Webber
Works at FullStory
Attended Georgia Institute of Technology
Lives in Atlanta, GA
6,751 followers|2,088,191 views
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Occupation
Senior Bit Twiddler
Employment
  • FullStory
    Founder, 2012 - present
  • Google
    2005 - 2012
  • Lotus Development
    Intern, 1991 - 1992
  • Pixel Technologies
    1992 - 1994
  • Heuristic Park
    1995 - 1997
  • Holistic Design
    1997 - 2000
  • AppForge
    2000 - 2002
  • Innuvo
    2002 - 2005
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Currently
Atlanta, GA
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404.425.9779
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153 Ponce de Leon Ct Decatur, GA 30030 USA
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Email
Story
Tagline
Dad. Software Geek. Xoogler. Reformed Game Programmer. Drummer.
Education
  • Georgia Institute of Technology
    Computer Science, 1990 - 1998
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Gender
Male
Birthday
February 3
Relationship
Married

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Joel Webber

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What is Vim? Vim is a highly configurable text editor built to enable efficient text editing. It is an improved version of the vi editor distributed with most UNIX systems. Vim is distributed free as charityware. If you find Vim a useful addition to your life please consider helping needy ...
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Stefan Haustein's profile photoScott Wilson's profile photoJoel Webber's profile photoAlex Rudnick's profile photo
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+Scott Wilson It exists! http://www.emacswiki.org/emacs/ViperMode  http://www.emacswiki.org/emacs/ViKeys 

... haven't tried it, but I've heard it's pretty good?
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Joel Webber

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This is absolutely awesome, and counts as a pretty big win for convolutional nets. All the manual DSP fiddling in the world has never managed to do a great job at vocal/instrument separation, yet falls quickly to a conv-net as soon as someone bothers to try.

I sure hope the same turns out to be true of other instruments. As it stands, you can't find more than 0.0001% songs available as separated instruments from masters (e.g., for practicing one instrument). And in many cases there are no separated masters, e.g., with old Rush songs where they just sat in a studio and recorded together.
 
\o/

!!!
Separating a singer’s voice from background music has always been a uniquely human ability. Not anymore.
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"Solves" is a bit of a stretch. It is just better than NMF. AFAIK single channel source separation problem, even in speech-music case is still a tough nut to crack.
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Joel Webber

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I don't even know where to start with something like this. I know there are good cops out there; probably lots, and I've known a couple personally. But they absolutely must stop defending the bad ones, which are becoming increasingly obvious of late (to those of us lucky enough to be born white and >= middle class; most of the rest of the country was already aware).

I can only hope that the ever-increasing number of personal cameras continues to expose the bad ones, creating pressure to change. I fear it's going to take a long time, though -- not just because such systems always resist change, but because it's going to take a long time for those of us lucky enough to believe we can trust cops to fully comprehend that not everyone shares that experience.
 
The 23-year-old and his family have been harassed and arrested by NYPD officers—treatment they say is retaliation for Orta's documentation of their misconduct.
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There is no such thing as a good cop. J. Cole summarizes https://youtu.be/xyRJ35NIOqE
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Joel Webber

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Seriously, Too Many Cooks (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrGrOK8oZG8) is behind a Blizzard game announcement? That doesn't even make sense. Please consider doing your part to rectify this injustice!

http://pv.webbyawards.com/2015/online-film-video/performance-craft/best-editing

[Yes, they want your email address to vote, but they're not spammy.]
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Joel Webber

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"The teenagers, he said, likely got into the car using a relatively simple and inexpensive device called a 'power amplifier.'"

Sounds like a very deep design flaw -- if your car opens in the mere presence of a fob, all you have to do is increase the distance at which it operates. There's no patching that.

You could at least stop car thefts by having the car shut down if it leaves the vicinity of the fob, but that's tricky to do safely.

Or you could do something utterly insane with the speed of light to measure the actual distance to the fob, as a function of propagation delay. But that's not trivial to measure by any means.

At those short distances, you'd need some kind of interferometer approach, I think, but that assumes clean propagation of the light wave, which isn't going to work through all that noise (we did this with optical fiber when I was working at GTRI, but that's a very simple scenario).

Reminds me yet again why I don't mind pressing a little button to open my car :)
 
A little black device available for $100 can give easy access to certain locked cars. But there may be a way to thwart the machine.
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Or you could do something utterly insane with the speed of light to measure the actual distance to the fob, as a function of propagation delay. But that's not trivial to measure by any means.

They do that with Wifi, though. :P
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Joel Webber

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Question for any Android watch owners with phones running Lollipop:

Does the "mute phone notifications" thing actually work at all? AFAICT, it seems to behave completely randomly. When you tap the volume rocker, the little popup says "Muted by Android Wear". But then it proceeds to vibrate and/or make noise regardless. Except sometimes it doesn't, for no obvious reason. I've tried "all" and "priority" notifications, but it makes little difference.

I've searched a bit for issues related to this, and found lots of people complaining, but it's not clear whether it's being resolved, or if there's a workaround. I really love the idea of just muting the phone and having my wrist buzz whenever something happens, but in this half-baked state it's driving me nuts!
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Yeah, that part kind of sucks. If I didn't charge it at night, I'd probably get ~1.5 days. And while you can use a standard USB cable, you have to remember to bring the inductive charger as well, or... no watch for you!
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Have him in circles
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Joel Webber

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Watching the latest season of Archer (which, if you appreciate great, utterly sophomoric dialog, you simply must do as well), and pleasantly surprised to see this random R. Land reference (http://shop.rlandart.com/product/loss-cat-jr-wall-art). Obscure Atlanta things FTW!
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Joel Webber

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It still cracks me up that Apple uses a 90s era CRT with a Blue Screen of Death™ as the icon for a Windows box on the network. I mean, it's honestly funny, but you'd think that in 2015, with Apple ruling the roost, they'd make their digs at Microsoft a bit more... subtle?
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+John A. Tamplin NT fails a strict, classic definition of microkernel, because it runs relatively lots of stuff in ring 0. But as you know the kernel is broken into several layers, everything above the HAL & kernel drivers is highly modular and portable. Since Vista it also moves most drivers to userland too. But most important, different also from traditional monolithic OSes, NT implements the bulk of OS services in userland: take filesystems for example, NTFS is all userland, but it relies on kernel services such as the I/O Manager, Security Manager, VMM and Object Manager.

Another way to put that is that the original concept of microkernel had VASTLY underestimated the complexity of the kernel. NT only includes the really fundamental things in the kernel (which makes it conceptually a microkernel), the catch is that it has very sophisticated fundamentals. For example, both LPC and the I/O Manager are just ways to invoke kernel services via messages (a concept you find in the classic microkernel theory), except that NT does these things in a really feature-rich, flexible, efficient way, including things like asynchronous dispatch, cancellation, prioritization etc. For another example, NT says that you really need a rich security system even at the lowest levels of the OS, because you want fine-grained access control of the most fundamental kernel objects. Now if you make such assumptions a small microkernel is impossible, there's no way to have these things implemented in userland — it's not just an optimization.

The big compromise of course was the graphic subsystem, not originally but post-v3.51 (IIRC) they had stuffed the old GDI into the kernel purely on performance reasons. But that's a hard problem, graphics/GPU  are a big corner case in the entire PC architecture. And I think they finally solved this problem too with WDDM user mode / miniport graphics drivers.
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Joel Webber

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This wonderful article reminds me of a quote from a doctor I respect (back in the 70s): “We’ll know we’ve achieved gender equality in medicine when we start seeing bad female doctors.”

https://medium.com/@amyngyn/i-need-terrible-female-engineers-1023a2e973dd
Think of a woman in the tech industry you admire. Describe her. If you’re thinking of someone particularly memorable, yo…
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Joel Webber

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Random: All my messages on commits that fix "NaNNaNNan"-esque bugs just say "fixed Batman bug".
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Joel Webber

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This is absolutely beautiful. Someone has simulated the 6502 (used in the Apple ][, C=64, and many other 8-bit micros), by quite literally photographing the traces and transistors, then building a functional model directly from that. The in-browser simulation (http://www.visual6502.org/JSSim/expert.html) is simply mesmerizing to watch. Don't miss the part that allows you to zoom in and trace individual lines as it's running.

This may seem like a giant waste of time, but think about this -- as it becomes harder and harder to find actual working CPUs from this era, we might have a bit of a preservation problem. There were probably few, if any, computers capable of dealing with a CAD design of this complexity (if the software was even available). So the original design is sitting somewhere on a pile of mylar sheets (or perhaps already destroyed).

Comment from +George Talbot on the original: "There's a great account in "On the Edge: the Spectacular Rise and Fall of Commodore" of the engineers that designed that chip (Commodore had bought MOS Technologies), using layers of colored mylar hand-assembled with scalpels and clear tape that were photographed and reduced.  It's kinda fascinating that these folks are doing the reverse of that...tracing the polygons and recreating them.  Interesting that an important skill at the time was the ability to manually check that the circuit was correct by visual examination of the mylar films.  Now that's dedication."
 
Okay, this is awesome. A complete transistor level simulation of the 6502 processor, done via a process that involves melting the cover of the chip with 200°F hot sulfuric acid to expose the die, taking 72 microscope images, stitching then together to make a 342Mpixel image, and then finding polygons that represent wires and transistor to then emulate the whole thing in software.

The slides from the SIGGRAPH talk are great:
http://www.visual6502.org/docs/6502_in_action_14_web.pdf
Visual Transistor-level Simulation of the 6502 CPU and other chips! Welcome to Visual6502.org! Here we'll slowly but surely present our small team's effort to preserve, study, and document historic computers. We aim to present our work in a visual, intuitive manner for education and inspiration, ...
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+Mark Wilbur Oh wow, I hadn't even noticed that. Epic.
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Joel Webber

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Looks legit. I bet she's from Llanfairpwllgwyngyll.
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In last two days two such account added me. What is the motivation behind fembots?
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Great selection, helpful and knowledgeable staff, and storytime is a godsend for those of us with little ones. They're also great about bringing authors in for book signings and to meet the kids.
Public - 9 months ago
reviewed 9 months ago
We've been going to carpe diem since it opened, and have always loved it. I don't know where reviewers who didn't like the food went, but it must not have been the same restaurant. We've never had a problem with the service, either.
Public - 5 years ago
reviewed 5 years ago
2 reviews
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