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Joel Webber
Works at FullStory
Attended Georgia Institute of Technology
Lives in Atlanta, GA
7,028 followers|2,451,435 views
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Collections Joel is following
Education
  • Georgia Institute of Technology
    Computer Science, 1990 - 1998
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
February 3
Relationship
Married
Story
Tagline
Engineer, dad, Xoogler, startup founder @fullstory.com. Reformed drummer and game developer.
Work
Occupation
Senior Bit Twiddler
Employment
  • FullStory
    Founder, 2012 - present
  • Google
    2005 - 2012
  • Lotus Development
    Intern, 1991 - 1992
  • Pixel Technologies
    1992 - 1994
  • Heuristic Park
    1995 - 1997
  • Holistic Design
    1997 - 2000
  • AppForge
    2000 - 2002
  • Innuvo
    2002 - 2005
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Atlanta, GA
Contact Information
Home
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404.542.6258
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Address
153 Ponce de Leon Ct Decatur, GA 30030 USA
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Apps with Google+ Sign-in
  • Zen Pinball HD
  • Wayward Souls
  • Spirit Storm
  • Cardinal Quest 2

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Joel Webber

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Nice to see 538 doing a fairly comprehensive piece on basic income. Very thoughtful, and supportive of experiments:

http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/universal-basic-income/
Daniel Straub remembers the night he got hooked on basic income. He had invited Götz Werner, a billionaire owner of a German drugstore chain, to give an independent talk in Zurich, where Straub was…
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Joel Webber's profile photoRay Cromwell's profile photoAlex Rudnick's profile photo
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The Human Fund: Money For People. What's not to like?
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Joel Webber

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What a wonderful idea. I've never visited Sweden, though I've spent a little time nearby in Denmark, and I'm sorely tempted to try this out myself.
 
This is the kind of initiative each country should use. Making the world a smaller place !
On April 6th, the Swedish Tourist Association launched "The Swedish Number" an actual phone number people from all over the world can dial to speak with a random Swedish person. The marketing...
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Per Siden's profile photo
 
It's a fun idea, and a cool way to celebrate 250 years of freedom of speech. I actually signed up myself, and so far I've had the pleasure of taking several calls from curious people around the world.

The world is getting smaller...
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Joel Webber

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This has to be the most weird and wonderful cultural juxtaposition I've seen in ages.

Western speed/thrash metal
-> Japanese Pop
-> Back to the Late Show

Quoth Colbert: "I have no idea what I'm about to see."
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Frenchy Capalini's profile photoIsaac Truett's profile photoTau-Mu Yi's profile photoBill Neubauer's profile photo
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Seeing them live a few years ago was a treat.
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Joel Webber

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Brilliant.

(Courtesy of one Matt Crawford on Facebook)
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Joel Webber

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After the recent `leftpad()` debacle in Node-land, here we have the horrifying logical conclusion of non-hermetic insanity: https://gist.github.com/rauchg/5b032c2c2166e4e36713
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Robert Cooper's profile photoJoel Webber's profile photoRichard Vowles's profile photoGünter Zöchbauer's profile photo
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I Dart it seems they did it right. Couldn't find a flaw so far.
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Joel Webber

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The beginning of this video is just some slow-mo magnet recording.

But, you should watch through to the demonstration of the truly cool part, which involves a technique for printing arbitrary patterns of N/S poles on the surfaces of steel. These allow for some very novel mechanical interactions, from devices like "spring" magnets (a response curve that changes from attractive to repulsive along a single axis), to arbitrary patterns of pole switching along the surface, which can be used to guide movement in complex patterns. It's not difficult to imagine all kinds of novel mechanical uses for these!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IANBoybVApQ

[h/t +Jaime Yap]
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derek ha's profile photoBoris Callens's profile photoJoel Webber's profile photo
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There are a few cool ideas here: https://plus.google.com/+MarkBruce/posts/MnyyfZZv7JB
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Joel Webber

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Tl;dr -- presubmit code reviews have more to do with culture, security, and knowledge sharing than with catching bugs early.
 
Great post from +Bruce Johnson about why we embrace presubmit code reviews at +FullStory .
A big chunk of the FullStory engineering team formerly worked at Google, where there is a famously strong emphasis on code quality. Perhaps the most important foundational tenet at the big G is a prac
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Richard Vowles's profile photoChung Wu's profile photo
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Maybe it's a different version of gerrit? Looks like they are running the latest (2.12)
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Joel Webber

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There's a good chance you still harbor suspicion of fat, saturated or otherwise. And there's also a good chance your doctor is still giving you the advice that you should minimize your intake of the stuff. If your doctor's telling you this, then they're not a little bit off -- they're flat-out wrong, the evidence is overwhelming at this point, and was actually pretty strong even before the "fat hypothesis" took over in the 50s and 60s. This article does a good job explaining how that came to pass, and was driven by one of the well-known failure modes of the scientific process -- specifically, deference to authority, and to the strong-willed-but-wrong.

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/apr/07/the-sugar-conspiracy-robert-lustig-john-yudkin

"[...] the science writer Gary Taubes has assembled a critique of contemporary nutrition science, powerful enough to compel the field to listen. One of his contributions has been to uncover a body of research conducted by German and Austrian scientists before the second world war, which had been overlooked by the Americans who reinvented the field in the 1950s. The Europeans were practising physicians and experts in the metabolic system. The Americans were more likely to be epidemiologists, labouring in relative ignorance of biochemistry and endocrinology (the study of hormones). This led to some of the foundational mistakes of modern nutrition." [emphasis mine]

This, for me, is the most damning part. Loose correlations from shoddy epidemiological studies are the bane of health science. Epidemiology has an often-deserved reputation for being only a step up from reading tea leaves. Such studies should be used to support or refute an underlying hypothesis, but taken as truth on their own, they're more likely to obscure than illuminate.

Imagine if we tried to do physics or chemistry with only correlation studies, underlying theory be damned? That's obvious nonsense, yet largely representative of how we study health and nutrition.
The long read: In 1972, a British scientist sounded the alarm that sugar – and not fat – was the greatest danger to our health. But his findings were ridiculed and his reputation ruined. How did the world’s top nutrition scientists get it so wrong for so long?
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Marla Caldwell's profile photoJoel Webber's profile photoJohn “Catnip” Williams's profile photoTau-Mu Yi's profile photo
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I need to read Taubes book to comment on it more intelligently. However I am somewhat familiar with Lustig's Fructose hypothesis and it is still speculative. Physiology is quite complex and we really don't understand all of the various feedback loops yet.
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Joel Webber

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When Bloomberg is suggesting that a Basic Income makes more sense than a minimum wage (I agree), that lends credence to the idea that it's not just some crazy fringe scheme.

http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2016-04-01/a-basic-income-is-smarter-than-minimum-wages
Governments brave enough to try basic income may be able to abandon labor market regulation.
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Steve Yuan's profile photoSanat Gersappa's profile photoJoel Webber's profile photoRobert Cooper's profile photo
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Also, just randomly: That people think we have arguments today that our "founders" didn't have. Jesus Christ: those bastards didn't get along AT ALL.The Constitution and Bill of Rights are a split decision between the people of the day, not fucking commandments handed down. Paine and Franklin were socialists. Hamilton (and maybe Madison) were damned near fascists. Adams and Jefferson were usually who you thought they were, except they were slaver southerners. 

Our founding was complicated, and honestly we are still fighting all the same fights we fought back then today. 
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Joel Webber

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Yes, I'm pimping my company's blog, but this one's really good, I promise :)

http://blog.fullstory.com/2016/03/6-things-we-learned-making-a-feature-launch-video/
If you’ve used FullStory, Googled our name or followed us on any form of social media lately, you likely already know about our latest and greatest product release: Searchies. A huge company milesto
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Joel Webber's profile photoMarla Caldwell's profile photo
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+Joel Webber LOL. I'll go with "secure in your masculinity." I hope you also have the sad little birthday horn to go with it ;).
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Joel Webber

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As the evidence mounts to the point of being overwhelming, and the generations brought up on reefer madness and drug-war era propaganda die off, we'll eventually get change even in the US.

Sometimes these things change in a kind of "punctuated equilibrium", where change that seemed impossible one year becomes inevitable the next (see also: same-sex marriage). Crossing my fingers that this is the case here.
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Tau-Mu Yi's profile photoAndres Soolo's profile photoJoel Webber's profile photo
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Ha, yeah. Probably more actual damage than all the PCP ever consumed.
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Joel Webber

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Wow, this is pretty amazing. This implies to me that Apple's simply not going to bother becoming good at datacenters. I think this is a wise move, of course -- every big tech company doesn't need its own datacenters, and as long as there are 2-3 major choices, then no one competitor in other areas can get you "over a barrel", so to speak, just because you use them to host machines.

But it's also nice to see that contention and competition in one product area needn't lead to acrimony across the board. This is comparable to Apple being arch-enemies with Samsung in handsets, yet using them to fabricate chips (that's changing, of course, but the analogy still holds).

It's also a nice coup for Google's cloud division. They've been doing a great job on many fronts lately (full disclosure: I have friends working on it, and my own company's a big customer), and I'm glad to see this fact being recognized.

http://www.businessinsider.com/google-nabs-apple-as-a-cloud-customer-2016-3
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Emanuele Ziglioli's profile photoDan Weese's profile photoJoel Webber's profile photo
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It's also worth noting that Dropbox could easily be doing some core bits in Rust (or raw C, for that matter), while leaving plenty of performance-insensitive bits in Python, since they already have tons of it.

Just like Google has an extraordinary amount of C++ code in production, but also plenty of Java, Python, and Go. Actually I sometimes suspect Google has too much C++ code, but that's mostly a historical artifact.
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Joel's Collections
Great selection, helpful and knowledgeable staff, and storytime is a godsend for those of us with little ones. They're also great about bringing authors in for book signings and to meet the kids.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
We've been going to carpe diem since it opened, and have always loved it. I don't know where reviewers who didn't like the food went, but it must not have been the same restaurant. We've never had a problem with the service, either.
Public - 6 years ago
reviewed 6 years ago
2 reviews
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