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Joe Naylor
Lives in Bountiful, UT
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Joe Naylor

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Crazy.
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Finally!
The latest addition to The Lost Lands: Bard's Gate is a massive city full of exciting adventures in one massive full color book!
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Wayne Rossi's profile photoAnders Hedenbjörk Lager's profile photoJoe Naylor's profile photo
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Yeah, I put off Stoneheart at first because Bard's Gate is right in the middle of it, I finally bought the d20 version but by then had started into a different campaign.

I'll probably get this one because I've been looking forward to it for so long, and the kickstarter is long enough that I can spread out the cost in my budget. But we'll see, that also means I have a lot of time to have second thoughts. :)
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Someone in a private post was complaining that as people have uncircled or blocked them over political debates they've lost access to non-political posts they were interested in. I think my comment there is relevant to G+ as a whole:

Google took a long time to implement any kind of topic filtering on posts, so many people used circles for posting topics and asked others to tell them which circles to put them in. I warned about that for a long time, circles are a privacy mechanic and a reader stream filter. Google+ was designed for the reader to control what they see, not for the poster. So that habit kinda "broke" the system. Now for anyone who did that, if they uncircle you then you don't get their posts anymore, because topics=private.

I can't blame people too much, Google really screwed that up. It's no wonder they got the "ghost town" reputation since everyone felt like they had to hide all their posts in private topic circles.

But now, people ought to move their topic circles into collections instead. If you really do want a post to only be privately accessible to a limited group then circles are perfect, otherwise using circles for topics is slowly causing G+ to get quieter over time as people come and go.
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The Wrath of Kahn's profile photoJoe Naylor's profile photoArcamedes Thorn's profile photo
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ahh gotcha, thank you for the break down much appreciated.
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Isn't it interesting that we take all the domesticated cats and spay/neuter them, which means most breeding is done by feral cats, so basically we're selectively breeding cats to be wild again.
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That's a good point, we're breeding dogs into purses but cats will probably eventually eat us all.
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I just read a comment, "Do you not follow the hashtag on Twitter?"

Twitter? What is this, 2010?
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That's... weird. And awesome.

Via +Will Keaney
 
An eye moving at 700fps: you can see the retina wobble.
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Yeah. Gif name has it right, though. Cool. 
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Is it just me, or did Google just announce a bunch of products that largely do what we're already doing with different Google products?
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No school like the new school!
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Joe Naylor

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Don't give your rat a cell phone.
 
A major U.S. government study has linked cell phones with an increased risk of cancer among male rats. The findings are certain to add new fuel to a long-burning controversy. #NOVAnext
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Yup, there is no such thing as secure.

Via +Will Keaney
 
This is the most demonically clever computer security attack I've seen in years. It's a fabrication-time attack: that is, it's an attack which can be performed by someone who has access to the microchip fabrication facility, and it lets them insert a nearly undetectable backdoor into the chips themselves. (If you're wondering who might want to do such a thing, think "state-level actors")

The attack starts with a chip design which has already been routed -- i.e., it's gone from a high-level design in terms of registers and data, to a low-level design in terms of gates and transistors, all the way to a physical layout of how the wires and silicon will be laid out. But instead of adding a chunk of new circuitry (which would take up space), or modifying existing circuitry significantly (which could be detected), it adds nothing more than a single logic gate in a piece of empty space.

When a wire next to this booby-trap gate flips from off to on, the electromagnetic fields it emits add a little bit of charge to a capacitor inside the gate. If it just happens once, that charge bleeds off, and nothing happens. But if that wire is flipped on and off rapidly, it accumulates in the capacitor until it passes a threshold -- at which point it triggers that gate, which flips a target flip-flop (switch) inside the chip from off to on.

If you pick a wire which normally doesn't flip on and off rapidly, and you target a vulnerable switch -- say, the switch between user and supervisor mode -- then you have a modification to the chip which is too tiny to notice, which is invisible to all known forms of detection, and if you know the correct magic incantation (in software) to flip that wire rapidly, will suddenly give you supervisor-mode access to the chip. (Supervisor mode is the mode the heart of the operating system runs in; in this mode, you have access to all the computer's memory, rather than just to your own application's)

The authors of this paper came up with the idea and built an actual microchip with such a backdoor in it, using the open-source OR1200 chip as their target. I don't know if I want to guess how many three-letter agencies have already had the same idea, or what fraction of chips in the wild already have such a backdoor in them.

As +Andreas Schou said in his share, "Okay. That's it. I give up. Security is impossible."
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No contact with a network, only powered when you use it on an independent generator, no removable media, physically secured location. But even then human engineering is the biggest weakness, not even considering some crazy x-ray technology they invent tomorrow.

It seems to me that after the industry-standard security measures to thwart the common hackers, the best "security" is just to always assume you've been breached already and to have an efficient clean-up process when the problems arise. And that's mainly to protect against litigation, don't even pretend to have secrets you can keep secret.
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I gotta be honest, watching Game of Thrones this season often just makes me wish I was reading the next book.

Yeah, I'm referring to the craziness at the end of this week's episode. I think it really could have been better. It was good! But it was the Martin side that was good, the HBO side was kinda weak.

I started seriously considering if I really want the show to spoil the books for me, but then I remembered that if I don't keep up on the show the internet will do that anyway.

Ah well, what can you do. It's still the best fantasy-genre show on television right now.
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+Bobby Martin  Well... Yeah, technically it could be considered a Roman period piece. There is no magic or dragons. I thought about that when I said it... but it fits within the same broad genre in my head.

I do highly recommend it, especially the first season. Unfortunately the lead actor died after that, so there was a gap where they did a short prequel season and then returned with a new actor. It floundered a bit after that but I loved how it all ended up.

But I need to give a caveat. It's more explicit than GoT is, and just about anything else on TV.

The violence is graphic to the point of absurdity. Many scenes I just had to uncomfortably laugh/groan, "He chopped off his face! If his brain slides out.. Gah!" And there's a lot of sex and nudity. If you can handle the first four episodes, you're good.

But the writing is what kept me watching. Twists and backstabbing and all the rest, it's good. The showrunner is Steven DeKnight, who was a writer on some Joss Whedon shows and later ran the first season of Daredevil.
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Music underwater. Surreal.
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Yeah, it's weird. I know there's a mic, but I'm still surprised that we can hear their voices as well as we can.
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So true.
 
These are hilarious! I love the "mood swing" part.
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Yippy!
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Bountiful, UT
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Bountiful, UT - Pocatello, ID
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