Profile

Cover photo
Joe Hanson
Worked at University of Texas at Austin
Attended University of Texas at Austin
Lived in Austin, TX
8,204 followers|2,803,917 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

Joe Hanson

Shared publicly  - 
 
Check out this week's new +It's Okay To Be Smart, it's 1.21 Gigawatts of electrifying energy essentials!

The world of energy, that complex system behind the gas pump and the electrical socket, can be confusing, but if you're going to be an energy-conscious citizen you've got to speak the language. This week's video gives you a fun intro to some important principles of energy (with the help of Doc Brown)
3
2
Dirk Van de Vyver's profile photoJacob Whitt's profile photo
Add a comment...

Joe Hanson

Shared publicly  - 
 
If this GIF featuring me and Flava Flav "filming" a cooking show doesn't make any sense, it's because you haven't watched this week's new video yet!  

Remedy that here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tuBWjY9BpEc
1
Add a comment...

Joe Hanson

commented on a video on YouTube.
Shared publicly  - 
 
Of course life itself, all the processes that make it possible and create complex forms from disorganized ingredients, that's a reduction of entropy. Schrödinger called this so-called "negative entropy" a universal sign of living systems "drinking orderliness from a suitable environment."

Life sequesters energy, if only for a bit, and lets us do interesting things with it before giving it back to the universe.
25
Luis Galvan (NochesSinLuna)'s profile photoDave Pentecost's profile photoJose  Martinez's profile photo
3 comments
Add a comment...

Joe Hanson

commented on a video on YouTube.
Shared publicly  - 
 
How did you make it through this entire episode, and a mention of Jay Rosen, without referencing the "View From Nowhere"?! He has stated, and I agree, that the VFN is really the root problem, the unrealistic ideal that simultaneously dumbs down journalism and sets up unrealistic expectations for it in the public's mind.

The value of a piece of journalism, and journalists themselves, is ultimately tied to authority. Today's media are challenging the source of that authority, and Serial is but one example of that (see also: bloggers, Twitter, YouTube). For most of American history (or at least how it looks from the perspective of today), journalism held an unearned, sort of assumed authority, based on this nebulous concept of "objectivity" and journalists saying "you should believe me because I am a sterile conduit for information who calls him/herself journalist" and that because they could zoom out infinitely that they were giving you the "whole story". 

Now people are starting to see that this unearned authority is hollow and doesn't always provide us with the most useful information. We are (I think) entering a time when authority is earned by, as you said, transparency, but also through experience, accuracy and verification, comprehensive (but not always equal) consideration, honest assessment of reality, and ultimately using the expertise gained by years or decades of exposure to a beat to deliver information that is useful and valuable. All of this rests on transparency, though.

And before anyone starts screaming "authority fallacy", I don't think this qualifies, because it is an earned authority, it is applicable expertise, and therefore has value.

"Objectivity" doesn't even have just one useful definition, at least in the public's mind. Here I'll rip off a few from Rosen: Should claims be based on verifiable facts? Yes. Should journos report what is and not what we want to be? Of course. Should it mean pulling back and showing where journos are coming from on an issue? Yes. Should journos be able to describe without offering opinion? Yep. But should should journalists only describe without offering opinion? That is where objectivity fails. 

Journalists establish a much more real authority by being honest about their process, their knowledge, their experience, and their POV. This is essentially what you said about transparency, but without the "A-word". Koenig didn't do this perfectly (her white privilege is a failure of POV, her failure to contact Urick is failure of process) but she did it openly. Mostly.

Jay Rosen also makes a point that American journalism is in almost every way dumber than the journalists who make it. That is a sign of a broken system. Koenig's transparency and openness wrt her process and research (and you alluded to this) allows us complete access to what she knows, the journalism she produces is no dumber than she is. It may not be perfect, but it is a reflection of her knowledge, her process, and makes her authority (even if it is limited) very clear.
57
1
Ram Villanueva's profile photoMaster Margarita's profile photodarkfire090's profile photoEric Smalley's profile photo
15 comments
 
+PBS Idea Channel +Joe Hanson 
Reminds me of something MedievalPOC from tumblr mentions directly, and indirectly, as well. She runs a blog about inherent biases in art academia and history and emphasise that there is no such thing as objectivity. There are plenty of codes and symbols that she points out which allude to objectivity, such as academic lingo or referring to unexamined texts of old translations and interpretations, that defend and obscure one's own biases and promotes those biases as factual knowledge decades after they've been made.

She also openly promotes critical engagement of audiences by stating that she doesn't supply factual historical proof (which she explains is impossible) but instead gives access to information and objects that might create debate and criticism which would allow said audience to identify their own social/cultural biases and misinformation and promote their critical thinking. But even then it's more complicated than merely objectivity and authority and facts. There's agenda and biases, and who gets access to what information, and who has permission to discuss said information (without ridicule or dismissal). I think it also ties a bit with the Hank Green article linked earlier, relating to who has the 'legitimacy' nowadays. Trust in something, be it academia or or journalists, is a layered concept that I think we like to pretend or hope is objective but has so many other issues packed away under it all. 

Either way I probably made a mess but it's a great tumblr page and I think it has a lot of interesting and potential topics for the Idea Channel to tackle! 
Add a comment...

Joe Hanson

Shared publicly  - 
 
NEW VIDEO! 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnMULQDHIjk

Do you ever talk to your dog? Do they ever talk back? Humans and dogs have a truly amazing relationship, developed along an evolutionary journey that goes back nearly 10,000 years. Do they really understand what we say, think, and feel? Recent research suggests dogs know more about our language and emotions than you might think.

Find out more on this week's +It's Okay To Be Smart!!!
10
2
ucktay's profile photoDiamondKnightHD's profile photoBjörn Simon's profile photoMaria Eduarda Grimaldi's profile photo
6 comments
 
+ucktay because of  google plus
Add a comment...

Joe Hanson

Shared publicly  - 
 
NEW VIDEO! Where Do Birds Go In Winter?

As winter approaches, V-shaped flocks glide overhead as the world’s birds begin their long treks to warmer climates. Humans used to have some pretty crazy theories about where birds went when it got cold, like the moon, or to the bottom of the ocean. Seriously.

How did we learn the real story of bird migrations? Which bird takes the longest/highest trip? How do birds store up energy for their long journey? How do birds navigate? Why do they fly in a V-shape?

Find out in this week’s video! http://youtu.be/ds2XFvSQzBg

If you like the videos we're making, please consider subscribing on YouTube: http://bit.ly/iotbs_sub
10
2
Gail Lewis's profile photoSinisterSkyline's profile photoDirk Van de Vyver's profile photoMadhusudan S's profile photo
2 comments
 
Hey, a friend of mine told me about a study he did about tribes through the theme of peace making people weaker, prosperity spoiling to the point they had no incentive to be strong and how that facilitated their annihilation at the hands of other tribes that were in dire need of resources... I'm paraphrasing, but I wanna know... Is there any truth in it?
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
8,204 people
NZ Hcrime's profile photo
Scott Fedor's profile photo
Rizal Rashid's profile photo
lex hamers's profile photo
Pyro MoverHD's profile photo
mithra loi's profile photo
Sylvain Gagnon's profile photo
Rob Holmes's profile photo
Matty John's profile photo

Joe Hanson

commented on a video on YouTube.
Shared publicly  - 
 
I agree wholeheartedly with your "passing through" concept, but w.r.t. infrastructure, I'd argue that the interstate highway system did far more to hurt the road trip than to help it. Rather, the original U.S. highway system is the quintessential piece of pavement for "passing through". The road trip is more Route 66, less I-10. 

The interstate highway system seems to encourage less passing through and more passing around. Sound insulating walls and off-ramps don't really encourage experiencing the trip as much as using the road as a conduit from point A to point B (which is exactly what Eisenhower et al. wanted, because HoJo's and the Corn Palace aren't strategic centers). The highway exit itself, which came along with the interstate, determines when and where you pause your trip and what you see there. It's a pretty unempowering arrangement.

The U.S. highways used to, and in many places still do, pass right through the centers of towns. They very nearly literally defined "Main Street USA", although that does sort of invite the paradox of "which came first, the street or the city?" The U.S. highway system also coincides better with the rise of car culture in Amurika, being implemented in 1926 and likely enabling the evolution of the car from lumbering city carriage to sleek, gas-guzzling ship-o'-the-highway.

We can discuss this more during our road trip from Phoenix to the Grand Canyon after Phoenix Comic-Con which everyone should come see me and Mike at yayyy!
2
Add a comment...

Joe Hanson

commented on a video on YouTube.
Shared publicly  - 
 
I like to imagine that, like, one day in the past, he was just Hozy. And then he became more himself than he was before, and he was like "Guys, I think that, now… I'm Hozier"
1
Add a comment...

Joe Hanson

commented on a video on YouTube.
Shared publicly  - 
 
Here's an idea: Everyone in the comments who is providing an opinion on "objectivity" should have to define what they mean by "objectivity" because there is no objective definition of that word
17
Beef Chavez's profile photoGabriel Rangel's profile photonicodemous52's profile photoxander johnson's profile photo
19 comments
 
Objectivity: striving for absolute truth. What you really mean is that different entities have different definitions of objectivity which isn't really a new concept. Try again.
Add a comment...

Joe Hanson

commented on a video on YouTube.
Shared publicly  - 
 
Here's one of Facebook's worst repeat offenders: https://www.facebook.com/willyfoo

What if we all messaged him this video and posted it on his wall? Let's try!
15
1
Nathanael Walsh's profile photoYouTube Junkie's profile photoDavid Niedbala's profile photoDavid Bockman's profile photo
6 comments
 
Sucks this never took off. I have the page made and all. 
Add a comment...

Joe Hanson

Shared publicly  - 
 
NEW VIDEO! Climate Science: What you need to know (in 24 easy steps!)

Maybe you believe what climate scientists are telling us, that the climate is changing and we're to blame, but you have trouble explaining exactly WHY? This video is for you.

Or maybe you don't believe what climate scientists are telling us? Fear not, this videos is for you too! 

Please SHARE with your friends. Knowing is half the battle!
35
6
Sheril Kirshenbaum's profile photoJoze Bregar's profile photoJim McKay's profile photoKevin Murray's profile photo
10 comments
 
+delray gunnr Wot?
Add a comment...

Joe Hanson

Shared publicly  - 
 
NEW +It's Okay To Be Smart VIDEO! There's a whole lot of dying going on. Welcome to the Sixth Extinction.

Earth's species are dying at an alarming rate, and, well… I don't know how to tell you this, but it's your fault.

Check out more: https://www.youtube.com/user/itsokaytobesmart
31
2
DudV2's profile photosykoelf's profile photoLuis Galvan (NochesSinLuna)'s profile photoWalter Méndez's profile photo
8 comments
sykoelf
+
1
2
1
 
I am LOVING your environmental videos!
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
8,204 people
NZ Hcrime's profile photo
Scott Fedor's profile photo
Rizal Rashid's profile photo
lex hamers's profile photo
Pyro MoverHD's profile photo
mithra loi's profile photo
Sylvain Gagnon's profile photo
Rob Holmes's profile photo
Matty John's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Chief Science Dude at It's Okay To Be Smart
Skills
Science + Teaching + Internet
Employment
  • University of Texas at Austin
    Graduate Research Assistant, 2006 - 2013
  • Amgen
    Quality Associate, 2004 - 2005
  • M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
    Research Assistant, 2003 - 2004
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Austin, TX - Los Angeles, CA - Houston, TX - Albuquerque, NM
Story
Tagline
Ph.D. biologist, science writer and video-maker, whiskey-lover, man-about-town
Introduction
The universe is awesome. It's my job to show people the how and why.
Bragging rights
Once did the Kessel Run in less than 12 parsecs, with a beer in my hand and one hand tied behind my back.
Education
  • University of Texas at Austin
    Ph.D. - Cell and Molecular Biology, 2006 - 2013
  • University of Texas at Austin
    B.A. - Biochemistry, 1999 - 2003
Basic Information
Gender
Male