Profile

Cover photo
Joachim Stroh
Worked at Towers Watson
Attended New York University Stern School of Business
Lives in New York City
1,733 followers|702,949 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

 
Chris Granger introduces a new kind of symbolic programming language, calls it "a medium for thought". 

http://www.chris-granger.com/2014/03/27/toward-a-better-programming/ (via HN) 
9
2
Steve Flowers's profile photoJohn Kellden's profile photoDoug Breitbart's profile photoEdouard E's profile photo
7 comments
 
If we add to the above the analogy:

Code and Culture as Code, the implications are enormous.

In short, we need to design, build and ship: GitHub for Culture Code.
Add a comment...

Joachim Stroh
owner

Visual Metaphor  - 
 
We're doing another webinar with Socialcast on April 3rd and you can register here: http://goo.gl/iFXkbE  Speakers are Harold Jarche and Carrie Basham Young!
4
1
Eric Ziegler's profile photo
Add a comment...
 
H/t +Jon Husband How To Negotiate With People Around The World

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/communication-charts-around-the-world-2014-3
18
9
John Verdon's profile photoGrizwald Grim's profile photoJohn Kellden's profile photoDoug Breitbart's profile photo
29 comments
 
+Colin Kilburn yes. Storytelling as Code. Storyweaving as Coding.

What FB and Google is eg for automatic facial and pattern recognition (our digital avatars and habits turned mechanical turks),

Project Mixtape is for snap-to-grid, automagical mind recognition (our digital avatars and habits augmented).
Add a comment...

Joachim Stroh
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
Here's another collaborative pattern [1] we've developed for our Socialcast webinar [2], part of the 2014 Socialcast Thought Leadership Series. After initial conversations in the stream, the outline was created (with multiple authors), reviewed (in realtime) by SC and then condensed into a raw slide deck (focusing on the content only). After another round of reviews, the visuals were added to the same deck (edits were still permitted so that changes could happen until the very last minute). The final step was a simple export to pptx and pdf handing the files over to SC for the webinar presentation.

[1] https://docs.google.com/drawings/d/1JD_lmooVQLJLY6R4RxarWeD6qMr0rjiXeQBLG3nyn1A/view

[2] http://www.changeagentsworldwide.com/webinar/2
4
2
Joachim Stroh's profile photoSusan Emerick's profile photoJohn Kellden's profile photo
2 comments
 
Absolutely, Susan. What's nice about this process is that you can take the final result and embed it directly in your webpage, allow for downloading or share it through your social media channels, all without moving or converting  it! Here's an example for the previous webinar - the presentation you see it the final step in the process:  http://www.changeagentsworldwide.com/webinar/1

p.s. added your suggestion to the visual to make it more clear, thanks!
Add a comment...

Joachim Stroh
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
If you've missed our First Year Anniversary cake on our Twitter feed, here it is again.. complete with a proper narrative!
10
Deborah L Gabriel's profile photo
 
thanks for the share, +Joachim Stroh 
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
1,733 people
hereth Nuwan's profile photo
Jerry Michalski's profile photo
Jeff Willinger's profile photo

Joachim Stroh

Deep Stuff  - 
 
Just wanted to do a deep dive on some themes from the last HoA [1], namely adding layers to the meta-cognition matrix. One layer is topology from a previous post (+Doug Breitbart talked about architectural and geographic overlays with an increasing resolution and +Michael Josefowicz's idea of content levels). The community topolopy below opens Content x Context, the structured content/posts (left, down, the static part) and what the community does with it (across, the dynamic part, creating the conversation space). Each square can be another artifact ([2] as an example) ; the yellow ones are community-cocreated (sprouts) vs. the red ones are individually authored (roots). There's also a fractal dimension to it as you zoom into a square. Lastly, the aspect of Intelligence Amplification that John brought up a few times that can be (one) outcome. Now back to the surface.

[1] https://plus.google.com/u/0/101010252943098026073/posts/ACrjnZdB9YM
[2] https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1E-lCvuHHNYQJa2NFC4rXAbmFVQcTZ-uO4kcL4BZu7jc/edit
10
Joachim Stroh's profile photoMichael Josefowicz's profile photoJohn Kellden's profile photoGrizwald Grim's profile photo
26 comments
 
I like the Carcassone in its own right +Joachim Stroh. You know how I love terrain. I'm interested in the idea of the generalized co-op version, and in stewarding and tiling the Commons.
Add a comment...
1
Marie-Louise Collard's profile photo
 
Always good to know what the pro-emailers are saying - and its almost convincing - but not! "So old that we've moved on".
Add a comment...

Joachim Stroh

Visual Narrative  - 
 
Looking at this photograph by Fabian Oefner, I was thinking how some posts in the Conversation Community start as bright-colored blots and then expand and become multi-colored, creating new shades of color that weren't there before. Color reflecting conversation.

http://fabianoefner.com/
9
Joachim Stroh's profile photoColin Kilburn's profile photoJohn Kellden's profile photo
Add a comment...
 
Sharing another collaborative pattern here:
 
Here's another collaborative pattern [1] we've developed for our Socialcast webinar [2], part of the 2014 Socialcast Thought Leadership Series. After initial conversations in the stream, the outline was created (with multiple authors), reviewed (in realtime) by SC and then condensed into a raw slide deck (focusing on the content only). After another round of reviews, the visuals were added to the same deck (edits were still permitted so that changes could happen until the very last minute). The final step was a simple export to pptx and pdf handing the files over to SC for the webinar presentation.

[1] https://docs.google.com/drawings/d/1JD_lmooVQLJLY6R4RxarWeD6qMr0rjiXeQBLG3nyn1A/view

[2] http://www.changeagentsworldwide.com/webinar/2
2
1
John Kellden's profile photo
Add a comment...

Joachim Stroh
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
Fascinating discussion on Google in the Enterprise (and what it means for corporations in general) ignited by +Leland LeCuyer 
 
Google in the Enterprise: Squeezing Through the Revolving Door
When I saw the Tech Republic article, "The three factors keeping Google from a full-scale enterprise assault," I first thought of sharing it with +Robert E. del Sol, because helping businesses build their operations around Google's apps has been his business for several years running. But then I thought this article really ought to be shared with the entire erstwhile SynaptIQ+ gang, because each of us brings to the party such diverse experiences and talents that, collectively, we can arrive at a more complete description of the whole elephant than any of us, standing alone, possibly could: a horn-like tusk, a snake-like trunk, a leaf-like ear, four tree-stump legs, a rope-like tail etc. So let me tag +Shaker Cherukuri, who has worked extensively in and consulted for many large corporate enterprises, +Meg Tufano who lives in the future and depends upon Google's services to remain there, +David Amerland who climbed to the peak of the corporate infrastructure then leapt, figuratively, out the window so that he could soar even higher on the updraft of his expansive global social network. As for me, in a prior life I spent over two decades alternating between academic to commercial enterprises integrating Macs with Windows, then learning how to construct and administer large scale data storage networks before taking my current residence as the fool on the hill.

Then, I thought, why not just share this with everyone? If anyone finds it interesting, great! If not, she or he can ignore it. The more diverse and distinct perspectives that may be brought to witness, the more complete and more accurate the description will invariably become. +Gideon Rosenblatt once upon a time worked at Microsoft but has since moved on to become a, no the, sage visionary regarding good business. And +Adam Johnson, who has retreated from Google+ to devote more time to the establishment of his recycling concern, has such a clear-eyed view of these kinds of matters, that he is someone whose opinion and insight I alway take seriously. 

Google the Corporation
Global corporate conglomerates operate today in the best of times and the worst of times. Never have profits been greater. Never has the future been more uncertain. In many ways these behemoths have grown into monstrosities that serve no human purpose whatsoever and leave in their wake a legacy of destruction and devastation. Yet business is one human endeavor that holds out the possibility of everybody "winning." In other words, in a world where too often people have been pitted against other people so that victory for one side comes at the expense of loss for the other, business promises something better. Political elections produce winners and losers. Either the plaintiff or the defendant prevails in the courtroom. But business, when conducted properly, holds out the possibility that I get what I want in exchange for you getting what you want. Satisfying the customer is as central a part of the business ethos as generating a profit.

So where does Google, along with its many apps and services — ranging from the Drive suite of apps to Hangouts, to Ad Sense, to the Google+ network —fit into this narrative? Clearly Google competes against a deeply entrenched Microsoft. Apple has all the ingredients to launch an assault on the enterprise market were it inclined to do so, but I think Apple sees itself too much as a jeweler, an exquisite artist who makes incredibly beautiful, shiny electronic baubles, not the nuts and bolts that tie everything together. So Google, mostly, competes against Microsoft for access to the mindscape of the corporate overlords; even while Microsoft struggles to recover from its ugly heritage of monopoly which left it peculiarly out of touch with its customers.

Will global corporations still be around 100 years from now? Or have they become dinosaurs awaiting the asteroid of their own manufacture? And where, if anywhere, does Google fit in?

I suspect that Google is experiencing difficulty penetrating into the corporation because so many executives are clinging to a nostalgic past that is, well, past. They yearn for a bygone era where command and control allowed them to dictate what they make and what they sell by fiat. Take it or leave it. The only competition they faced in this bygone era came from other dinosaurs roaming the prairie. But today its the fleas that are more dangerous. Fleas that swarm and bite and harass. Little guys. Entrepreneurs. Inventors. Bloggers.

I have a suspicion that if the global corporations can somehow be saved from extinction, indeed if they are even worthy of being saved, is in some unclearly defined way symbolically linked to the acceptance of the Google suite and the new way of engaging in business that this represents. Oh it's not the apps that are revolutionary. No, what is so revolutionary is the entire ecosystem within which the apps operate. Those who want to preserve the old regime of top-down domination instinctively, if not quite consciously, recognize that this new order, this new framework, is very dangerous to the old way of doing things they have desperately resolved to preserve.

This resistance to change, I fear, is what Google is really up against. But I, unlike Rob, have no vested interest whether or not Google chromebooks populate row after row of cubicles instead of the array of PCs that sit there nowadays. However I and you and every living creature on this planet do hold a vested interest in maintaining life on planet earth. I wonder whether the people who work in the corporate environment can actually change their workplace and their culture and the entire understanding of what they are actually doing and actually trying to accomplish before, like Dante, they drag civilization through the Inferno, then through Purgatory, before anybody can entertain any hope whatsoever of ever reaching Paradise?

So there we have it. I have just confirmed that I am indeed the fool on the hill. Please Rob, please rescue me from these ravings. Please find some way to make sense of this so that it may be translated into a practical and effective course of action.

Links:
The Tech Republic article, "The three factors keeping Google from a full-scale enterprise assault" by Conner Forrest, which precipitated these ravings may be read in full at http://goo.gl/9ZWj5Z.

The Beatles song "The Fool on the Hill," clipped from their feature length film, The Magical Mystery Tour, may be enjoyed at http://youtu.be/EDtK7xUIDxk.

And if you happen to Google "the corporation," as I subliminally suggested, more likely than not you will receive this link as your top hit: http://www.thecorporation.com/. It's a spellbinding documentary that everyone should watch and think about.

A shortened link to this post is http://goo.gl/gx2NPd.

Thank you for taking the time to read this.

#google   #business   #corporations  
6
Susan Scrupski's profile photoCarsten Rose's profile photoGregory Esau's profile photoJon Husband's profile photo
5 comments
 
BTW: That thread is an excellent example of what I love Google+ for!
raison d'être
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
1,733 people
hereth Nuwan's profile photo
Jerry Michalski's profile photo
Jeff Willinger's profile photo
Work
Occupation
“Thus, the task is not so much to see what no one yet has seen, but to think what nobody yet has thought about that which everybody sees.” -- Schopenhauer. h/t Gerardine Rudolphy
Skills
knowledge management • next generation intranet • team collaboration spaces • content management • web content publishing • enterprise search • social business collaboration and networking • change management and communications • large scale project management • people and cross-functional team management
Employment
  • Towers Watson
    KM Practitioner, 1996 - 2012
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
New York City
Previously
Berlin - Kaiserslautern - Beijing
Contact Information
Work
Email
Story
Tagline
Thinker • Strategist • Change Agent
Introduction

Joachim Stroh is a Knowledge Management expert and Change Agent for social collaboration with over 15 years of experience in the consulting industry. He is best known for his metaphorical visualizations, inspiring presentations, and clear visions for bridging technology and business. 

Bragging rights
"Complexity is your enemy. Any fool can make something complicated. It is hard to make something simple." -- Richard Branson. Founder of Virgin Group
Education
  • New York University Stern School of Business
    Business
  • TU Berlin: Technische Universität Berlin
    Computer Science
Basic Information
Gender
Male