Profile

Scrapbook photo 1
Scrapbook photo 2
Scrapbook photo 3
Scrapbook photo 4
Scrapbook photo 5
Jim Carver
Worked at Self
Attended University of Colorado
13,354 followers|1,363,558 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

Jim Carver

Shared publicly  - 
 
Here's a nice site. It's very informative. I love leeks...I bought some huge monsters the other day and I'm pondering...
1
Add a comment...

Jim Carver

Shared publicly  - 
 
WASHINGTON—U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists and their colleagues have conducted research showing the potential response of rangeland plants in arid regions of the United States to the conditions that will occur with climate change, according to a paper published today in Nature.
Agricultural Research Service (ARS) biological technician Melissa Reyes-Fox and Fort Lewis College assistant professor Heidi Steltzer were the lead co-authors on the paper. ARS is USDA's chief intramural scientific research agency, and the research supports the USDA priority of responding to climate change.
"Agricultural producers want to know how global climate change is affecting their production and management practices," said ARS Administrator Chavonda Jacobs-Young. "This work is one example of how ARS scientists are helping producers meet climate change challenges and continue the cost-effective and environmentally sustainable production of food and feed."
In a 5-year investigation, the researchers assessed the effects of increased temperatures and carbon dioxide levels on plants growing in a native mixed-grass prairie. For their study, they used a field system called Free-Air CO2 Enrichment to elevate current levels of carbon dioxide to 600 parts per million, the level of atmospheric carbon dioxide that is expected in the latter half of this century. Outdoor heaters in the fields kept air temperatures at current levels and at day and night temperatures that were 2.7 and 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than ambient temperatures.
The scientists tracked leaf emergence, flower production, seed maturation, and canopy senescence in four grasses, a shrub, and a forb common to northern mixed-grass prairie plant communities. The resulting yearly data trends indicated that the plants responded to warmer temperatures with earlier leaf emergence and flowering. Some species also responded with earlier seed maturation and canopy senescence. On average, the growing season for plant communities exposed to higher temperatures began five days earlier and lasted six days longer.
However, when plants were exposed to a combination of warmer temperatures and elevated carbon dioxide levels, the growing season began seven days earlier and lasted 14 days longer. The researchers believe that elevated carbon dioxide levels prompt greater water conservation in some of the grassland plants, which in turn delayed early plant senescence and death.
A plant community gets a jump-start on its growing season when the first species leafs out earlier in the spring, and the growing season continues until the last species enters senescence in the fall. So while warming temperatures can increase the length of the growing season in some grasslands communities by promoting earlier spring growth, elevated carbon dioxide levels can help plants conserve water and delay fall senescence.
1
Add a comment...
 
My job lately has been trying to find some relief for #DupuytrensContracture and I'm having some luck. Conventional western medicine provides very little aside from surgery, radiation (in Europe) and an enzyme (collagenase) . All these procedures are destructive, (I've had the physical surgery.), and lead to complications of their own. These therapies also have a very high rate of re-occurrence with subsequent treatments leading to further complications. What is needed then, is a chemical solution that greatly slows or arrests the disease completely. I have some positive results and while I have not done a long term study, I do believe I have enough positive results on myself that I can recommend some things to try.

Dupuytren's contracture is a genetic disease in which the palmar fascia becomes abnormally thick due to the fact that there is a change of collagen type. Normally, the palmar fascia consists of collagen type I, but if a patient has Dupuytren’s disease, the collagen type I changes to collagen type III, which is significantly thicker than collagen type I. Onset of the disease is usually the formation of a nodule of hardened tissue and later a visible cord develops and thickens. This leads to loss of function, a drawing in of the tendon and weakness.

The cell responsible for development of the disease is the myofibroblast. Researchers (Liaquat S. Verjee et al, 2013) excised myofibroblasts from patients with the disease to try and define the signaling pathways for their formation. They found significant numbers of immune cells, including classically activated macrophages and high levels of proinflammatory cytokines. They compared the effects of these cytokines on contraction and profibrotic signaling pathways in fibroblasts from the palmar and nonpalmar dermis of Dupuytren’s patients and palmar fibroblasts
from non-Dupuytren’s patients. Addition of TNF (Tumor necrosis factors), but not other cytokines, promoted differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts in Dupuytren's patients. Neutralizing antibodies to TNF inhibited the contractile activity of myofibroblasts derived from Dupuytren’s patients, reduced their expression of α-smooth muscle actin, and mediated disassembly of the contractile apparatus.

In plain English: There are compounds known as TNFs and for a short explanation of these I refer you to the wiki: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tumor_necrosis_factors> . Some TNF is absolutely necessary for proper immune function. Excessive amounts are being implicated in a host of autoimmune disorders and some types of cancer. There are some new drugs on the market that are TNF inhibitors but none currently in testing for DC. I also note that these drugs (one of which is self-injectable) carry a high price tag and some potentially fatal side-effects. This is of course depending if you could get your doctor to prescribe an off label use and that is by no means certain. So the rest of this article focuses on natural ways to lower TNF by the use of naturally derived substances. (We don't have time to wait on them.)

The first things to do are the simplest and the hardest:
1. Eat a healthy balanced diet.
2. Exercise, especially stretching, of the whole body, not just the hand(s).
3. If you smoke, try to quit. If you drink, quit or cut down.
4. Eat foods and drink teas that have a high degree of antioxidants, green tea, black tea, sour cherry juice, cranberry, etc.
5. Take supplements that have a high TNF inhibitory response, you can google around for yourself, but here's some I have come up with:

Fish oil (9 g per day in three divided doses)
CoEnzyme Q10
Vitamin E (mixed tocopherols)
Flax seed oil
Turmeric (courcumin)
N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine
Acetyl-L-Carnitine
Garlic capsules
Magnesium (preferably a time release form like Jig Saw brand)
Herbs and spices that have a good degree of polyphenolic compounds such as cloves, cinnamon and basil.

Free form amino acids to help the stuff work better

Now I did save the best for last and the ones that have had the largest effect lately:
*A proprietary product called Nexrutine, it is the extract of Phellodendron amurense (cork tree) 500 mg/4 times per day
*Seasons of Discontent herbal tea blend from Mountain Rose, formulated for people with allergies (see the connection?).
Contains: organic Nettle leaf, organic Fennel seed, organic Lemongrass, organic Spearmint leaf, organic Eyebright, organic Calendula flowers, organic Peppermint leaf, organic Red Clover herb and blossoms, organic Lavender flowers, organic Blue Vervain, and organic Stevia leaf.
Drink it three times a day. If you can't get this blend, then use stinging nettle leaf.

Okay that's it for now. I'm working on a topical creme to go with the supplements and will feature Red Sage root for its novel magnesium compound. There's also some other Japanese herbs I can't find in the US I'm working on getting also.
If you want to see the papers I've been reviewing go to:
gloresis.com/node/575 through 587.
#TNF #FibroticDiseases  

You can also read a version of this post on http://gloresis.com/node/588
3
1
Thepthat Wanpean's profile photoRakesh Yadav's profile photoJim Carver's profile photo
5 comments
 
Right on +Rakesh Yadav I hope you have time to look at the TNF scenario. It's quite enlightening in a number of ways.
Add a comment...
 
You guys might remember the owl post from a few days ago. There's more to the ecosystem with birds playing a large part. If you have a little to give, or want to take part in a more active way then support a fine group of individuals who (sorry) are all out for the birds.

I am, and I think you might try it for yourself.

#Birds #Ecosystems #JustPlainFun  
2
Add a comment...

Jim Carver

Shared publicly  - 
 
The happiest you'll ever be is when on Sunday evening you feel like you got a helluva lot done this weekend.
The unhappiest you are is when Monday rolls around and you realize you have to fix all those mistakes you made over the weekend. ;)
1
Add a comment...
 
"After Yellowstone’s sizable earthquake on March 30, there was a lot of craziness. People were throwing around theories that animals were running from the park in fear, that the earthquake would trigger an eruption and that helium emissions were rising in the caldera, meaning an eruption was coming. Now, in my fervor to stifle such fearmongering, I said that no, none of these events are in any way related to a potential upcoming eruption at Yellowstone. Well, I received an email from Dr. Jacob Lowenstern, the scientist-in-charge of the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, that brought me back from getting carried away because one of those three could actually tell us about activity in the caldera. No, it wasn’t the animals — they’re just migrating — and no, the earthquake isn’t going to trigger an eruption (I covered that last week). However, there is an interesting story in regards to helium and magmatic activity — and it turns out that helium might be able to help in volcano monitoring in the future."

#Yellowstone #Volcanoes #Helium  
4
1
Richard Sidler's profile photo
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
13,354 people

Jim Carver

Shared publicly  - 
 
Honey, want a dark chocolate shake? I have a new recipe...:)
1
1
Jacques Paul's profile photoDian Pink's profile photo
 
I think this is so kool...cheap to produce;-)
Add a comment...

Jim Carver
owner

Alternative Treatment Options  - 
 
 
My job lately has been trying to find some relief for #DupuytrensContracture and I'm having some luck. Conventional western medicine provides very little aside from surgery, radiation (in Europe) and an enzyme (collagenase) . All these procedures are destructive, (I've had the physical surgery.), and lead to complications of their own. These therapies also have a very high rate of re-occurrence with subsequent treatments leading to further complications. What is needed then, is a chemical solution that greatly slows or arrests the disease completely. I have some positive results and while I have not done a long term study, I do believe I have enough positive results on myself that I can recommend some things to try.

Dupuytren's contracture is a genetic disease in which the palmar fascia becomes abnormally thick due to the fact that there is a change of collagen type. Normally, the palmar fascia consists of collagen type I, but if a patient has Dupuytren’s disease, the collagen type I changes to collagen type III, which is significantly thicker than collagen type I. Onset of the disease is usually the formation of a nodule of hardened tissue and later a visible cord develops and thickens. This leads to loss of function, a drawing in of the tendon and weakness.

The cell responsible for development of the disease is the myofibroblast. Researchers (Liaquat S. Verjee et al, 2013) excised myofibroblasts from patients with the disease to try and define the signaling pathways for their formation. They found significant numbers of immune cells, including classically activated macrophages and high levels of proinflammatory cytokines. They compared the effects of these cytokines on contraction and profibrotic signaling pathways in fibroblasts from the palmar and nonpalmar dermis of Dupuytren’s patients and palmar fibroblasts
from non-Dupuytren’s patients. Addition of TNF (Tumor necrosis factors), but not other cytokines, promoted differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts in Dupuytren's patients. Neutralizing antibodies to TNF inhibited the contractile activity of myofibroblasts derived from Dupuytren’s patients, reduced their expression of α-smooth muscle actin, and mediated disassembly of the contractile apparatus.

In plain English: There are compounds known as TNFs and for a short explanation of these I refer you to the wiki: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tumor_necrosis_factors> . Some TNF is absolutely necessary for proper immune function. Excessive amounts are being implicated in a host of autoimmune disorders and some types of cancer. There are some new drugs on the market that are TNF inhibitors but none currently in testing for DC. I also note that these drugs (one of which is self-injectable) carry a high price tag and some potentially fatal side-effects. This is of course depending if you could get your doctor to prescribe an off label use and that is by no means certain. So the rest of this article focuses on natural ways to lower TNF by the use of naturally derived substances. (We don't have time to wait on them.)

The first things to do are the simplest and the hardest:
1. Eat a healthy balanced diet.
2. Exercise, especially stretching, of the whole body, not just the hand(s).
3. If you smoke, try to quit. If you drink, quit or cut down.
4. Eat foods and drink teas that have a high degree of antioxidants, green tea, black tea, sour cherry juice, cranberry, etc.
5. Take supplements that have a high TNF inhibitory response, you can google around for yourself, but here's some I have come up with:

Fish oil (9 g per day in three divided doses)
CoEnzyme Q10
Vitamin E (mixed tocopherols)
Flax seed oil
Turmeric (courcumin)
N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine
Acetyl-L-Carnitine
Garlic capsules
Magnesium (preferably a time release form like Jig Saw brand)
Herbs and spices that have a good degree of polyphenolic compounds such as cloves, cinnamon and basil.

Free form amino acids to help the stuff work better

Now I did save the best for last and the ones that have had the largest effect lately:
*A proprietary product called Nexrutine, it is the extract of Phellodendron amurense (cork tree) 500 mg/4 times per day
*Seasons of Discontent herbal tea blend from Mountain Rose, formulated for people with allergies (see the connection?).
Contains: organic Nettle leaf, organic Fennel seed, organic Lemongrass, organic Spearmint leaf, organic Eyebright, organic Calendula flowers, organic Peppermint leaf, organic Red Clover herb and blossoms, organic Lavender flowers, organic Blue Vervain, and organic Stevia leaf.
Drink it three times a day. If you can't get this blend, then use stinging nettle leaf.

Okay that's it for now. I'm working on a topical creme to go with the supplements and will feature Red Sage root for its novel magnesium compound. There's also some other Japanese herbs I can't find in the US I'm working on getting also.
If you want to see the papers I've been reviewing go to:
gloresis.com/node/575 through 587.
#TNF #FibroticDiseases  
1
Add a comment...
 
Barney gets serious in this one. He decides that he doesn't need that one bullet...and it's probably safer that way :)
#MeanMonkeys #BarneyPower #YouCrazyMessWithRednecks  
2
Add a comment...

Jim Carver
owner

Health and You  - 
 
What Is the Difference between Yogurt and Kefir?

Our friends at Cultures for Health have some answers:
<quote>
Many people assume that because yogurt and milk kefir are both cultured dairy products, there isn’t much difference between the two. This is not true. There are many differences between yogurt and milk kefir, including how each is made, the types of bacteria present in each, and the flavor and consistency.
Starter Type
There are two types of yogurt starter: mesophilic and thermophilic. Mesophilic means that the yogurt starter is cultured at room temperature. 
Thermophilic means the yogurt starter is heat-loving, and cultures at around 110ºF, in a yogurt maker or similar appliance. 
Milk Kefir is a mesophilic culture, which means it cultures at room temperature.
Propagation
There is also a difference in how each starter is propagated. Reusable yogurt starters, once activated, are re-cultured by mixing a bit of a previous yogurt batch into fresh milk. Once the new batch is complete it becomes the starter for the next batch, and so on. Yogurt cultures generally require reculturing once each week.
Direct-set, or single-use, yogurt starters come in powdered form, and are usually thermophilic. Each new batch of yogurt requires a new packet of starter. While this type of yogurt may be re-cultured a few times, at some point a new packet of powdered starter will be required.
Milk Kefir, on the other hand, is cultured using milk kefir grains. The "grains" are actually a gelatinous mass harboring a generous variety of bacteria and yeast from which one can make continual batches of kefir. Milk kefir grains should be transferred to a fresh batch of milk about every 24 hours.
Milk kefir can also be made from a powdered kefir starter, similar to the direct-set yogurt culture. Powdered Kefir Starter Culture may be re-cultured a few times using kefir from the previous batch, but eventually, new powdered starter will be required.

Types of Bacteria Present
Yogurt and milk kefir contain different types of bacteria, each of which performs different tasks.
The beneficial bacteria found in yogurt help keep the digestive tract clean and provide food for the friendly bacteria found in a healthy gut. They pass through the digestive tract and are called transient bacteria. A chart listing the bacteria strains found in each of our yogurt starters may be found here.
The bacteria in milk kefir, on the other hand, can actually colonize the intestinal tract. Kefir also contains a lot larger range of bacteria, as well as yeasts. For more information on the bacteria generally known to comprise milk kefir grains, click here.
Flavor and Consistency
Yogurt generally has a flavor familiar to most people. Different varieties of yogurt starter produce yogurt that varies from mild to tangy. The consistency of yogurt varies from a thin, pourable yogurt, such as Piima, to a fairly thick, creamy yogurt such as Bulgarian. 
Milk Kefir is also tart, but it can have a touch of yeast flavor, due to the beneficial yeasts present in the culture. Milk kefir's flavor is more sour, and has been described as a cross between cultured buttermilk and yogurt.
Most varieties of yogurt are also thicker than kefir, given the same length of fermentation time. While yogurt is almost always eaten with a spoon, milk kefir is usually consumed as a cultured dairy drink. 
Versatility
Both yogurt and milk kefir may be made thicker by draining whey from the finished product. 
Draining whey from yogurt results in a thick Greek-style yogurt. Longer draining times yield labneh or yogurt cheese.
Milk kefir can be drained of whey to make a spoonable kefir, soft spreadable cheese, kefir cream cheese, or even hard cheese.
In addition to these different cheese products, both yogurt and milk kefir are quite versatile, and can be used in many recipes, from dips to baked goods. 
Conclusion
Yogurt is a good source of probiotic bacteria, requiring weekly maintenance, depending on the culture chosen. It is generally a spoonable consistency and may be mild or tart in flavor. Yogurt may be used in a variety of recipes.
Milk kefir is a great source of probiotic bacteria and yeast, and requires daily maintenance, if using milk kefir grains. It is generally more sour in flavor and of a pourable consistency. Milk kefir may also be used in many, many recipes.
</quote>

Check em out at http://culturesforhealth.com
+Cultures for Health 
1
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
13,354 people
Work
Occupation
Environmental Education
Employment
  • Self
    Janitor
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Introduction
Jim attended The University of Colorado and majored in Geology, Geography and Environmental Studies, worked in Chemistry after college and had a fruit orchard in Western Colorado. He now has a computer business in Texas. Enjoys flying, the outdoors and gardening. He also has a son and three energetic grandchildren who like to drive him crazy.

That was an Intro for a news service in which I used to contribute. It was a good starting point at first.
These days, I think that I should write something a little more down to earth. While the above is true, it doesn't really convey much about my interests. I also wonder, is there anybody out there except me who reads this shit?

Maybe I'll just list what I think is important and get on with the day:
Agnostic, earth science, opinionated hippie not afraid to listen to both sides, but doesn't listen to any bullshit either. Enjoy sarcasim, reading, culinary, weather, domestic animals and holistic health. Environmentalist that hates nuclear power and greenpeace. Enjoys computers that only run Linux. Politically nuetral because I hate both parties equally. Liberal and conservative depending on the issue.
Bragging rights
Survived Texas Summer 2011
Education
  • University of Colorado
    Environmental Science
  • Southwest School of Electronics
    Electronics Technician
  • The University of Texas
    Geology