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Jim Carver
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=62&v=JrJJxn-gCdo
An excellent talk by Dr Gavin Schmidt.

"The models are skillful, but what we do with the information from those models is totally up to you".

Gavin Schmidt: The emergent patterns of climate change

You can't understand climate change in pieces, says climate scientist Gavin Schmidt. It's the whole, or it's nothing. In this illuminating talk, he explains how he studies the big picture of climate change with mesmerizing models that illustrate the endlessly complex interactions of small-scale environmental events.

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Passing by Trump International Hotel pic.twitter.com/jHj75zRPqt
— Bob Henson (@bhensonweather) 29 April 2017 
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Yeah, like you can really "remove" it. Delusional assholes. 

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Recent evidence suggests that a massive body is lurking at the outskirts of our solar system, far beyond the orbits of the known giant planets. This object, at a distance approximately 20 times further than Neptune and with a mass approximately 5000 times larger than Pluto, is the real ninth planet of the solar system. In his lecture, Mike Brown talks about the observation that led his team to the evidence for this Planet Nine and discusses how so massive an object could have been hiding in the outer solar system for so long. He also discusses the international effort to pinpoint this newest member of our planetary family. Mike Brown is the Richard and Barbara Rosenberg Professor of Planetary Astronomy at the California Institute of Technology, specializing in the discovery and study of bodies at the edge of the solar system. He is best known for his discovery of Eris, the most massive object found in the solar system in 150 years, which led to the debate and eventual demotion of Pluto from a real planet to a dwarf planet. In 2006 he was named one of Time Magazine's 100 Most Influential People and was inducted into the National Academy of Sciences in 2014.

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A precious collection of ice cores from the Canadian Arctic has suffered a catastrophic meltdown. A freezer failure at a cold storage facility in Edmonton run by the University of Alberta (UA) caused 180 of the meter-long ice cylinders to melt, depriving scientists of some of the oldest records of climate change in Canada’s far north.

The 2 April failure left “pools of water all over the floor and steam in the room,” UA glaciologist Martin Sharp told ScienceInsider. “It was like a changing room in a swimming pool.”

The melted cores represented 12.8% of the collection, which held 1408 samples taken from across the Canadian Arctic. The cores hold air bubbles, dust grains, pollen, and other evidence that can provide crucial information about past climates and environments, and inform predictions about the future.

[Ignore the stupid title, Sciencemag seems to be a bit drunk, the title should read: "Unique Canadian ice core collection suffers catastrophic meltdown".]

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These might be fun to make. I picked up a lot of puff pastry and pizza dough and froze it. Not sure what to go with...I've tried the pizza crust and it's good, not as good as I make , but there's no work to it either. ...and as always, funjoy...

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