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Jim Carver
Worked at Self
Attended University of Colorado
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Jim Carver

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I predict we will have another La Niña in the next two years. Yep, I'm really feeling strong about this. It's not for the lack of forecast rigidity though because they are right everytime, for as long as it takes.
The ENSO does look to increase through the next six months period. Oh Lordy, finally, huh? Just what everyone wanted. Maybe, you saw what it was like when it was neutral...guess not many folks liked that. 
Maybe I can get on this extended forecast schedule?  I say in ten years today wont be like it is now. That's my extended forecast.
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Jim Carver

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Another trick is to bend a cane and bury part of it in the ground or a pot. When it roots you cut it and you have a new rose plant true to form.
Btw, with patented hybrids this may be technically illegal. I don't see any problem as long as you don't try to sell them, for that you would need a license.
 
How to propagate roses from cuttings. #roses #gardening #garden 

Source - Georgia Month-by-Month Gardening

http://www.wholehomenews.com/blog/How-to-Propagate-Roses-from-Cuttings/552
06/01/15 BY Beth Sweet. When does the adage "more is more" come perfectly into play? Answer: when you're growing roses. If adding more roses to the garden is your goal (and who doesn't have that goal?), try propagating a new plant from existing cuttings. In their book Georgia Month-by-Month ...
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Jim Carver

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Black-eyed peas are a staple in the South, for some, maybe most Southerners they are a must have on New Year's Day.
It's interesting to see how some people classify peas and beans. What is the real difference between peas and beans, if any?
Well we do know they are legumes, but a lot of things are, it's those types of plants that have nodules that hold nitrogen-fixing bacteria.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legume

According to http://www.differencebetween.net/object/comparisons-of-food-items/difference-between-peas-and-beans/
1.Peas are characterized by their hollow stems while beans possess more solid stems.
2.In general, beans lack tendrils as compared to peas that use their leaf tendrils to twine.
3.Peas are treated as vegetables in the realm of cooking even if they are ordinarily fruits.
4.With regard to cotyledon development, beans have their cotyledons emerging from the ground unlike in the case of peas.

I'm a little pretty sure I don't like no.2, okay I guess leaf tendrils is okay, I guess we're part way home on this. Beans have twining tendrils and peas have leaf tendrils, got it.

But, now we certainly have the definitive word on it:
Black-eyed peas (Vigna unguiculata) are a variety of the cowpea and are part of the family of beans & peas (Leguminosae or Fabaceae in the USA). Although called a pea, it is actually a bean. Both peas and beans are legumes, and both have edible seeds and pods. According to the Penguin Companion to Food, bean is a “term loosely applied to any legume whose seeds or pods are eaten, not classed separately as a pea or lentil.” Beans traditionally were in the genus Phaseolus, but now some of the species, including the black-eyed pea, are in the genus Vigna. Peas are in the genus Pisum.
The common names of beans and peas are not consistent; other legumes popularly called “peas” are the butterfly pea (Clitoria ternatea), the chickpea (Cicer arietinum), pigeon peas (Cajanus cajan), and the winged pea (Lotus tetragonolobus). As legumes they are extremely nourishing vegetables, both to people and to the soil. They are able to fix nitrogen, meaning nitrogen from the air is taken in by the plant and bacteria living in the roots convert it to a useable plant nutrient. Because of this process, nitrogen-fixing plants improve soil quality by adding nutrients back into the soil.
http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/mysteries/blackeyedpeas.html
So there we have it, no cowpea has even raised a tendril from its leaf. So it is a bean.

Next week I tackle chickpeas. And for more unpopular reading, check out my new book, "Hey asshole, Get a Decent Pan!" and "Here's Guacamole in Your eye Bitch". They're sure to be undersellers and you should look for them in your local dumpster soon. (I pay a small fee to have your trash service delayed so you have a chance to fish them out.)
So with all this ranting and raving, what do we have left? All I know is that I wasted enough time now that the peas/beans are done. ;) Eat your heart out America, I have real pork tenderloin and beans ready.
And you know this Country was Founded on P&Bs. ;D
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Jim Carver

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I've got a whole package of instant converters for all your conversion needs on my website. Just enter in the units you have in one field and you get all the others. To get a conversion constant for the others, enter a '1' in the desired field.
For solutions it is infinitely easier to use the metric system instead of ounces and gallons, quarts, pints, etc. It'll drive you crazy after a while.
The best things to know off the bat is that a quart is about 1000 mL, a teaspoon is 5 mL, dessertspoon 10 mL and a Tablespoon is 15 mL.
As a chemist I usually get annoyed when someone gives me something in ounces per gallon. And there are two kinds of ounces, weight and volume. Grrr! :) Use grams and milliliters or liters; you'll be happy you did. 
Angular Velocity Converter · Area converter · Density Converter · Energy Converter · Force Converter · Power Converter · Pressure Converter · Solution Converter and Molar Coverter · Speed Converter · Temperature Converter · Volume Converter · Weight Converter ...
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Jim Carver

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Yep
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Jim Carver

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Oh well, it's Friday night in the united States.
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+Gerry Nealon I like the good solid rock beat and the bass part really drives the gear.
I could have listened to it for three more minutes if they had written some more lines.
I think it ran out about right though.
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Jim Carver

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We've had a lot of rain in the lower Plains states and if you live here, that's not news. What I would like to talk about is our upcoming mosquito problem.
Dump out any buckets or pans, etc., that have collected water. Try to drain those areas that have standing water by any means possible. Sometimes just digging a small ditch is all that is necessary to let water runoff. Do it now. It only takes a few days for larvae to hatch out in stagnant water.
Prevention is 9/10 of the cure.
#mosquitos #mosquitoControl  
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I really don't know why I'm sharing this, I generally hate breakfast type foods. They are usually too high in sugar, fat  and carbs. Fruit is good, but they usually add more sugar to something that would have tasted fine to begin with...that is if you're tongue wasn't so acclimated to high amounts.
It's the same way with salt. I can taste the natural salt in a serving of meat without any added. I did try one time to use zero salt and see what happens. You know what happens usually? Things taste like shit. You have to have a little salt in there for most things to cook properly. It's a chemistry thing. Doesn't mean you have to pour the whole shaker in there though.
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+Roger Parkinson I don't really have that much against salt and sugar, I use the pink salt in all my dishes. It's mostly that the modern American diet uses so much .
Crepes are cool and you find them in many cuisines besides French, although they carry different names.
It seems like all cultures have pretty much used the same techniques with only the ingredients being different. What's the difference between a spring roll and a fried burrito? Not much except for the ingredients and even that is not much different. Bean sprouts vs. refried beans, etc. Tamales wrapped in corn husks vs. banana leaves and so forth. There's a lot of commonality.
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Jim Carver

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Black-eyed peas are a staple in the South, for some, maybe most Southerners they are a must have on New Year's Day.
It's interesting to see how some people classify peas and beans. What is the real difference between peas and beans, if any?
Well we do know they are legumes, but a lot of things are, it's those types of plants that have nodules that hold nitrogen-fixing bacteria.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legume

According to http://www.differencebetween.net/object/comparisons-of-food-items/difference-between-peas-and-beans/
1.Peas are characterized by their hollow stems while beans possess more solid stems.
2.In general, beans lack tendrils as compared to peas that use their leaf tendrils to twine.
3.Peas are treated as vegetables in the realm of cooking even if they are ordinarily fruits.
4.With regard to cotyledon development, beans have their cotyledons emerging from the ground unlike in the case of peas.

I'm a little pretty sure I don't like no.2, okay I guess leaf tendrils is okay, I guess we're part way home on this. Beans have twining tendrils and peas have leaf tendrils, got it.

But, now we certainly have the definitive word on it:
Black-eyed peas (Vigna unguiculata) are a variety of the cowpea and are part of the family of beans & peas (Leguminosae or Fabaceae in the USA). Although called a pea, it is actually a bean. Both peas and beans are legumes, and both have edible seeds and pods. According to the Penguin Companion to Food, bean is a “term loosely applied to any legume whose seeds or pods are eaten, not classed separately as a pea or lentil.” Beans traditionally were in the genus Phaseolus, but now some of the species, including the black-eyed pea, are in the genus Vigna. Peas are in the genus Pisum.
The common names of beans and peas are not consistent; other legumes popularly called “peas” are the butterfly pea (Clitoria ternatea), the chickpea (Cicer arietinum), pigeon peas (Cajanus cajan), and the winged pea (Lotus tetragonolobus). As legumes they are extremely nourishing vegetables, both to people and to the soil. They are able to fix nitrogen, meaning nitrogen from the air is taken in by the plant and bacteria living in the roots convert it to a useable plant nutrient. Because of this process, nitrogen-fixing plants improve soil quality by adding nutrients back into the soil.
http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/mysteries/blackeyedpeas.html
So there we have it, no cowpea has even raised a tendril from its leaf. So it is a bean.

Next week I tackle chickpeas. And for more unpopular reading, check out my new book, "Hey asshole, Get a Decent Pan!" and "Here's Guacamole in Your eye Bitch". They're sure to be undersellers and you should look for them in your local dumpster soon. (I pay a small fee to have your trash service delayed so you have a chance to fish them out.)
So with all this ranting and raving, what do we have left? All I know is that I wasted enough time now that the peas/beans are done. ;) Eat your heart out America, I have real pork tenderloin and beans ready.
And you know this Country was Founded on P&Bs. ;D
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Okra grows well here too. It's mango season right now and the dogs are eating them. Don't let shelties eat mangos. It's disgusting. Afterward they slink around with a perverted expression of post-orgasmic satiation.
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All in all, you're just another, stick in the mud. :)
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Parenchyma, collenchyma and sclerenchyma are the main cell types that form structures such as xylem and phloem.
In a general way, we like eating parenchyma, those nice green leafy cells taste good. Collenchyma is the gritty stuff in pears and sclerenchyma is what we would consider fiber. The last two types are the ones that give plants their strength. Parenchyma contains the chloroplasts and provides all the energy.
If you can reduce the amount of stress on your plants by limiting wind and water stress, then you can avoid making too many of the harder, stronger cells and more energy will be available to grow food.
This is the reason why many items grown in the greenhouse are better, or maybe I should say tend to taste better. There's less environmental stress from not being pounded by the wind and rain.
Studies have been done that show an increase in shoot tip movement caused by wind reduces shoot tip growth in a log fashion. So it's not even linear and you see this in places. Some places the wind blows so much nothing can get over 3 ft. high if that.
Anyway, it's good to know your cell types and there's not that many in plants. Animals have a lot more specialized cells. 
There are many different types of plant cells, including epidermal cells, guard cells, parenchyma cells, and collenchyma cells. As...
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You guys hear about DoggieDeppgate? This except is extremely funny...I personally like Vegemite, you have to know how to use it though. I would never put it on a slice of bread. Wish they had a lower sodium version.
I'd like to make a deal with the Ozzies: We promise to not bring our little terror dogs in, which by the way are pampered and taken better care of than 90% of you, if you will get rid of that clown you call a PM and stop grinding the Great Barrier Reef to bits. Deal?
No? Okay, fine, and a note from the Doctor isn't good enough either?
You know what this is then? Yep, total all out war. I've got some invasive shit in my backyard here in Texas that will destroy what you have left. You thought rabies was bad? Ha! ;)
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Work
Occupation
Environmental Education
Skills
Critical thinking, chemistry lab tech, electronics design, modeling, technical writing, mapping, building trades and design including carpentry, electrical and plumbing, innovative adaptation (uses junk well)
Employment
  • Self
    Janitor
    No business can run well until you clean up the mess.
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Looking for
Networking
Other names
asshole, son of a god damn bitch, know-it-all, smart alec
Story
Introduction
Jim attended The University of Colorado and majored in Geology, Geography and Environmental Studies, worked in Chemistry after college and had a fruit orchard in Western Colorado. He now has a computer business in Texas. Enjoys flying, the outdoors and gardening. He also has a son and three energetic grandchildren who like to drive him crazy.

That was an Intro for a news service in which I used to contribute. It was a good starting point at first.
These days, I think that I should write something a little more down to earth. While the above is true, it doesn't really convey much about my interests. I also wonder, is there anybody out there except me who reads this shit?

Maybe I'll just list what I think is important and get on with the day:
Agnostic, earth science, opinionated hippie not afraid to listen to both sides, but doesn't listen to any bullshit either. Enjoy sarcasim, reading, culinary, weather, domestic animals and holistic health. Environmentalist that hates nuclear power and greenpeace. Enjoys computers that only run Linux. Politically nuetral because I hate both parties equally. Liberal and conservative depending on the issue.
Bragging rights
Survived Texas Summer 2011
Education
  • University of Colorado
    Environmental Science
    Climate science Resource Utilization Botany Geology Physics Chemistry Mathematics
  • Southwest School of Electronics
    Electronics Technician
    Troubleshooting, circuit design and construction Basic principles of electricity
  • The University of Texas
    Geology
    Geology Botany Physics Mathematics The Drag
  • SWTSU
    Geography
    Physical geology and geography Meteorology Astronomy Physics Mathematics Communication
  • Austin Community College
    Open, 1986
    Technical English Computer Science Accounting Economics Mathematics