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Jill Studholme
1,316 followers -
Writing on the marine environment and scuba diving
Writing on the marine environment and scuba diving

1,316 followers
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Jill Studholme's posts

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Okeanos Explorer returns from the Mountains in the Deep with great photos and videos from that previously unexplored world

Several different vibrantly colored animals can be seen in this image, taken at approximately 2,240 m including an Anthomastus mushroom coral (center), precious pink coral (right), and feather stars (crinoids).

It looks more like an image from a children's television program than a photo from the deep.

Image courtesy of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin.

http://news.scubatravel.co.uk/okeanos-explorer.html
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Interesting article in New Scientist -
Fish boost photosynthesis by wafting water around corals

The fin fanning of damselfish in the Red Sea helps boost the rate of photosynthesis of the algae that live inside corals.

We already knew that the damselfish (Dascyllus marginatus) lives in symbiosis with the coral Stylophora pistillata. The fish use coral branches as shelters and nests, and in return they remove sediment from the coral surface and excrete nutrients. But it turns out there is more to the relationship.

Nur Garcia-Herrera at the Alfred-Wegener Institute in Germany and colleagues measured oxygen levels inside the branches of coral kept in tanks either with or without fish.

They found that photosynthesis rates were higher during the day in tanks containing fish, probably helped by the fish’s fin strokes wafting away water containing high levels of oxygen. The presence of fish increased photosynthesis by 22 per cent.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2131495-fish-boost-photosynthesis-by-wafting-water-around-corals/

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Love this photo - one of the winners of the underwater photographer of the year competition. Taken in the Red Sea by Horacio Martinez - Oceanic whitetip I think.
via +The Guardian
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2017/feb/14/underwater-photographer-2017-winners-in-pictures-marine-oceans
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Win an awesome map of the best diving in the World
This fabulous world scuba diving map can be yours if you enter our free draw at http://news.scubatravel.co.uk/win-best-dive-world-map.html

Five of the maps on offer have a re-writeable whiteboard coating. Fantastic for recording where you’ve dived and when, or highlighting which of the world-class dives pictured you aim to do next.

You also have a chance to win a museum-quality jumbo canvas print on heavy, 100% cotton cloth measuring 150 x 90 cm (59″ x 35″) worth $140. Beautiful artwork for your home.

The maps show not only over 500 of the planet’s best places to dive but information about the type of dive and the underwater features. From the barracuda and shark diving in Sipadan, to Baja California via Italy’s Secca della Columbara – get excited about your next dive trip.

Completely illustrated by hand, the maps are designed to spark your wanderlust and animate your inner traveller. Made old-school style – with pen and paper – all the drawings are by illustrator Lars Seiffert. The maps are lovingly produced by the Awesome Maps company.

To enter go to http://news.scubatravel.co.uk/win-best-dive-world-map.html
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The Marine Conservation Society want you tell them about your sightings of basking sharks
We still have much to learn about these giant fish, which spend most of their lives hidden beneath the waves. There are historical hotspots where the sharks come to the surface to feed, but these seem to be changing - perhaps due to climate change. The MCS want to understand the impact of disturbance, and need you to keep an eye on where and when they turn up.
https://www.mcsuk.org/conservation_in_action/Basking+sharks
Photo credit: Tim Nicholson
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Florida sharks worth more alive than dead, says study
A week after Florida senators watered down a shark finning bill, research from Oceana finds that shark-related dives in Florida generated more than $221 million in revenue and fuelled over 3700 jobs in 2016. This compares to the total U.S. shark fin export market of just $1.03 million.

While shark finning is illegal in U.S. waters, shark fins – including imports from countries that allow finning – continue to be bought and sold throughout the U.S.

The demand for shark fins is one of the greatest threats facing shark populations around the world. Fins from as many as 73 million sharks end up in the global market every year.

Many shark populations have declined by more than 90 percent in recent decades due to overfishing.

http://news.scubatravel.co.uk/florida-sharks-worth-more-alive-than-dead-says-study.html
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Good to know - researchers find humans can interact with reef sharks without affecting the behaviour of the shark in the long term, and that well-regulated shark diving tourism can be accomplished without undermining conservation goals.

Bradley D, Papastamatiou YP, Caselle JE (2017) No persistent behavioural effects of SCUBA diving on reef sharks. Mar Ecol Prog Ser 567:173-184. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps12053

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Gozo's Azure Window, loved by divers as part of the Inland Sea to the Azure Window dive, has collapsed into the sea.
More at http://news.scubatravel.co.uk/gozo-azure-window-falls.html
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Gozo's Azure Window, loved by divers as part of the Inland Sea to the Azure Window dive, has collapsed into the sea.
More at http://news.scubatravel.co.uk/gozo-azure-window-falls.html


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Happy International Women's Day
"It’s Never Too Late To Be What You Might Have Been"
George Elliot
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