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Jill Studholme
Attended University of Manchester
Lived in Manchester
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Jill Studholme

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A great photo by +Yury Ivanov 
Algae shrimp - Phycocaris simulans although Hairy Chicken Shrimp is a better name
 
"A hairy chicken shrimp" :)

Algae shrimp - Phycocaris simulans. Bali, Tulamben, 26.01.2016. Nikon D80, 105mm, Subsee +10, UCL-165, in S&S, 2*S&S YS-D2, 1/200, f/25, ISO-100.

DO NOT MISS SPECIAL OFFERS 2016 !!!!!
http://www.divetulamben.com/special_offers.html

#algae #shrimp #phycocaris #simulans #mataharitulambenresortbali #matahari #tulamben #resort #spa #bali #underwater #under #water #photos #pictures #underwaterphotography #diveivanov #diving #marinelife #scubadiving #super #macro #macrophotography
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Wow... amazing picture.
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Jill Studholme

Underwater Photo  - 
 
Some great images in the Ocean Art photography contest. The winner was an extraordinary photo taken on a blackwater dive in Hawaii of Larval cusk eel with an external stomach by Jeff Milisen. More winning photos are at
http://news.scubatravel.co.uk/blackwater-image-wins-global-underwater-photography-contest.html
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Gorgeous!
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Jill Studholme

Marine Biology  - 
 
Stealthy cuttlefish use electric cloaking
Cuttlefish are renown for their tremendous camouflage capabilities – changing the colour and texture of their skin to match their surroundings. They have another weapon in their hide and seek armoury though – electric cloaking.

When a cuttlefish sees a predator, like a shark or other cuttlefish-eating fish, it freezes. The shark has eyes on the side of its head making it effectively blind straight ahead and near the front of the mouth. It relies instead on ampullae of Lorenzini which detect electrical fields.

The shark can sense a faint current emanating from the tube-like siphons on either side of the cuttlefish’s head and the gap around its mantle.

When the cuttlefish freezes it slows its ventilation, throws its arms around to cover the siphons and clamps down on its mantle, dropping its current right down. 

Should the freezing trick fail, the cuttlefish’s last-ditch defense is to squirt a cloud of ink and try to escape using jet propulsion.
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+Jill Studholme ok thanks!
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Lovely photo of Hoplophrys oatesii, the Cowry Coral Crab or Candy crab. Shows how beautifully it mimics the Dendronephthya soft coral. By +True Scuba 
 
Very Nice to see them again few days ago...
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Very nice! stunning color!
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SCUBA News  (ISSN 1476-8011) - Latest issue now out 
http://www.scubatravel.co.uk/scuba-news186.html
In this issue: Scuba bestsellers of 2015, fat corals, diving Malaysia, South Africa, Ustica and the diving and marine environment news from around the world.
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Google Rep: Click History Is Ranking Factor in Local Search

While most SEOs believe that Google must look at click behavior on search results as a ranking factor, Google has never publicly confirmed that this is the case.

Until now. At least for local results.

In a Google My Business forum post this week, Google staffer Rahul J included the history of how often a result had been clicked as one of the factor affecting visibility of a local buisness listing on Google.

See the post at https://www.en.advertisercommunity.com/t5/Enhance-Your-Presence/How-do-you-optimize-your-Google-My-Business-listing/m-p/486004#
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Shark virgin births seen in two generations for the first time
Two surprising new findings are overturning everything we knew about parthenogenesis, suggesting virgin births could be far more common than we thought.

Some animals, including Komodo dragons and domestic chickens, can sometimes produce offspring without copulating with a male. Females do this by using one of two methods to add an extra set of chromosomes to their eggs, producing either full- or half-clones of themselves. It had only been seen in captivity – until two virgin births were recently recorded in a wild sawfish and pit viper.

The process was also thought to be a dead end, producing infertile offspring. Now, for the first time, researchers have seen an individual born through parthenogenesis go on to have its own virgin birth.
 
These sharks seem to be doing fine without sex...
Two surprising new findings are overturning everything we knew about parthenogenesis, suggesting virgin births could be far more common than we thought
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My god.. What is this up to?
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Beautiful photo of a weedy sea dragon by +Rafi Amar 
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+Rafi Amar Your're welcome, great photo. Happy New Year
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What Are We Actually Protecting In The Ocean?
Interesting article in National Geographic by Carissa Klein, James Watson, Ben Halpern and Jennifer McGowan. Since 2006, there has been a growth of 10 million km² of new marine protected areas (MPAs). A new study has found, though, that most marine species are not well represented within MPAs and several hundred species are not covered at all.

A guiding principle in conserving global biodiversity is that all species should have some part of their range in protected areas. Sadly, a full 97 percent of the 17,438 marine species looked at have less than 10 percent of their ranges represented in the stricter forms of MPAs. Countries with the largest number of “gap species,” whose ranges lie entirely outside of protected areas, include developed nations like the U.S. and Canada.

The majority of species that are very poorly represented live in waters under national jurisdictions (approximately 200 nautical miles from shore). Thus, nations have the ability and authority to better protect biodiversity.

Countries have a tendency to think bigger is better when it comes to MPA establishment. This is often not true. Instead, it is the quality of the MPA that counts, and quality in part requires that a range of biodiversity is included.

The authors hope that countries will use the free global baseline to measure their own conservation progress and effectively plan for future protected areas.

The article is at http://voices.nationalgeographic.com/2015/12/16/what-are-we-actually-protecting-in-the-ocean/
The research on which the article was based is at http://www.nature.com/articles/srep17539

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Amazing nature.
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Stealthy cuttlefish use electric cloaking

Cuttlefish are renown for their tremendous camouflage capabilities - changing the colour and texture of their skin to match their surroundings. They have another weapon in their hide and seek armoury though - electric cloaking.

When a cuttlefish sees a predator, like a shark or other cuttlefish-eating fish, it freezes. The shark has eyes on the side of its head making it effectively blind straight ahead and near the front of the mouth. It relies instead on  ampullae of Lorenzini which detect electrical fields. 

The shark can sense a faint current emanating from the tube-like siphons on either side of the cuttlefish’s head and the gap around its mantle.  

When the cuttlefish freezes it slows its ventilation, throws its arms around to cover the siphons and clamps down on its mantle, dropping its current right down. 

Should the freezing trick fail, the cuttlefish’s last-ditch defense is to squirt a cloud of ink and try to escape using jet propulsion.

Journal reference:
“Freezing Behaviour Facilitates Bioelectric Crypsis in Cuttlefish Faced With Predation Risk,” Christine Bedore, Stephen Kajiura and Sönke Johnsen. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Dec. 2, 2015. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.1886
http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/282/1820/20151886
Further info: Duke University, https://today.duke.edu/2015/12/cuttlefishcamo
http://news.scubatravel.co.uk/stealthy-cuttlefish-electric-cloaking.html
Photo credit: David Collins
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Un Dorn
 
That is so beautiful , thank you so your nice photos .
www.angkordorndrivers.com
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Includes one of my long-time favourites -   Coral Reef Fishes: Indo-Pacific and Caribbean  by Lieske and Myers
 
Scuba Bestsellers of 2015
SCUBA Travel are pleased to release the list of the 2015 best selling SCUBA books and dvds  ►http://www.scubatravel.co.uk/bestsellers.html

Fifty Places to Dive Before You Die regains the top spot from Dive Atlas of the World, which drops down to third. Most of the books are either diving area guides - to specific locations or dives around the world - or sea life guides. One breaks the trend though: Simon Pridmore's Scuba Confidential. This tells readers how to be a better diver.

One DVD makes the list, showing the best diving locations in world.

See the full list at http://www.scubatravel.co.uk/bestsellers.html
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Diving fatalities down in 2015 - fewest for 20 years
http://news.scubatravel.co.uk/diving-incidents-up-in-2015.html 

Some key features of the 2015 report include:
◘ The lowest recorded figure for UK fatalities for over 20 years
◘ A trend of correlation between age and medical conditions 
◘ Incidents of decompression illness continues to fall
◘ There was an unusual pattern of reported incidents in spring and early summer

Brian Cumming, the BSAC Diving Incidents Advisor, commented "_Most of the incidents reported within this document could have been avoided had those involved followed a few basic principles of safe diving practice._"

He hopes divers will learn from others' mistakes. "_They have had the courage and generosity to record their experiences for publication, the least that we can do is to use this information to avoid similar problems._"

Read more at http://news.scubatravel.co.uk/diving-incidents-up-in-2015.html
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Education
  • University of Manchester
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Gender
Female
Story
Tagline
Writing on the marine environment and scuba diving
Introduction
Some days writing on scuba diving and the marine environment, others on data acquisition & control.

Edits SCUBA News (ISSN 1476-8011) which launched in May 2000. SCUBA News contains articles on diving destinations; features a marine "creature of the month" and brings news on events and research in the diving, marine life and other underwater fields. Tweets as @SCUBANews and contributes to the SCUBA Travel Facebook page. Also editor of the SCUBA Travel web site.


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Previously
Manchester - Ashbourne