Profile

Cover photo
Jesse Powell
Attended Scripps Institution of Oceanography
6,628 followers|980,550 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotosVideosReviews

Stream

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
A university centered on project-based learning. No lectures, no tenured professors.

What I’m thinking of is huge project spaces. Large centralized laboratories. Basically just large, large open spaces, as well as big centralized laboratories where no one really has their own individual laboratory. So it’s just one integrated giant laboratory. And that goes with the research model that there would be no departments; it would just be transdisciplinary.

paging +Mark Bruce 
Christine Ortiz, a dean of graduate education, envisions a new kind of college, built from scratch for today’s needs and with today’s technology.
1
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
A good, non-technical talk on neutron stars.
 
The Perimeter Institute has posted a video of a talk by Victoria Kaspi of McGill University about #NeutronStars and how studying them might be able to help some of the biggest questions cosmologists have about the #universe.

#Cosmology #Astrophysics 
4 comments on original post
2
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
Should Sanders and Clinton team up now to better fight the Republican opponent and avoid tearing each other down?

My gut tells me that an adversarial campaign is going to be long and costly. Worse, I think it will harm democratic candidates in senate and congressional races. If Hillary and Bernie work together now, I think the Dems might be able to recapture quite a few seats in the House and Senate. They would also significantly increase the chance for real progressive reform.

Which option would you vote for?
35 votes  -  votes visible to Public
Bernie as President, Hillary as VP
23%
Hillary as President, Bernie as VP
23%
I do not think they should team up
54%
2
Tom Nathe's profile photoChris Veerabadran's profile photo
2 comments
 
Both are polar opposites and all they'll do conflict with each other on real issues. 
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
These are beautiful. Highly recommended!
 
Man, could this guy Fan Ho take some good photos! :D

Here's a link with even some more: http://modernbook.com/store/fanho.html
These stunning photographs of Hong Kong in the 1950s are captured beautifully by a teenager. Ho Fan who arrived from Shanghai in 1949. The streets, filled with vendors, coolies and rickshaw drivers, fascinated Ho. Taking pictures in a studio was the norm then, but the Ho was more interested in r
2 comments on original post
5
1
David Andrews's profile photozymu habilis's profile photo
 
Those are wonderful! A few are extraordinary.
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
Senolytics (the removal of senescent cells) is going to be huge. I hope they fast track senolytic drugs and therapies into clinical trials.
 
Researchers extend lifespan by as much as 35 percent in mice

Mayo Clinic researchers used a transgene that allowed for the drug-induced elimination of senescent cells from normal mice. Upon administration of a compound called AP20187, removal of senescent cells delayed the formation of tumors and reduced age-related deterioration of several organs. Median lifespan of treated mice was extended by 17 to 35 percent. They also demonstrated a healthier appearance and a reduced amount of inflammation in fat, muscle and kidney tissue.
Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that senescent cells - cells that no longer divide and accumulate with age - negatively impact health and shorten lifespan by as much as 35 percent in normal mice. The results, which appear today in Nature, demonstrate that clearance of senescent cells delays tumor formation, preserves tissue and organ function, and extends lifespan without observed adverse effects.
8 comments on original post
2
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
"In 1978, while studying for her Ph.D. in physics, Sally Ride (May 26, 1951–July 23, 2012) answered a newspaper ad from NASA.

On June 18, 1983, she soared into the cosmos aboard the Space Shuttle Challenger and became the first American woman in space, the country’s youngest astronaut in orbit, and the world’s first lesbian astronaut to launch into the cosmos. “We’ve come a long way,” she declared. [...]"

Links below!
1 comment on original post
3
1
G. Gibson's profile photo
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
6,628 people
Ryan Groten's profile photo
Sarah “Yoga Sandals” CS's profile photo
Shannon Watters's profile photo
Sean McLaughlin's profile photo
John Schubert's profile photo
Alex Wilks's profile photo
Chris Dedman's profile photo
Liz RistrettoFacts's profile photo
The Voice's profile photo

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
Gather round, ye science puppies! Sci-tech is here!
 
SciTech #ScienceSunday Digest - 06/2016.
Permalink here: http://www.scitechdigest.net/2016/02/better-gene-delivery-better-dna.html 

Better gene delivery, Better DNA aptamers, Light effect transistor, Rejuvenation advances, Atomically precise materials, Integrated photonics modem, Electronic nematicity, Deep learning chips, Graphene lenses & electrodes, Flexiramic materials. 

1. Delivering Genes Across the Blood Brain Barrier
Using high-throughput screening techniques combined with methods of directed evolution, researchers screened millions of viral variants to create a novel, modified adeno-associated virus that is able to efficiently get past the blood-brain-barrier and deliver genes and genetic engineering tools to neurons and other cells of the brain http://www.caltech.edu/news/delivering-genes-across-blood-brain-barrier-49679. This obviates the need to drill a hole through the skull to inject these vectors and provides a far more elegant tool that can be used for CRISPR-powered modifications. In related news rats have been cured of a genetic liver disorder with a more effective CRISPR-delivery system involving a different adeno-associated virus carrying guide RNA and repaired-gene-insert and lipid nanoparticles carrying Cas9 mRNA instructions http://news.mit.edu/2016/crispr-curing-disease-repairing-faulty-genes-0201; 6% of liver cell transformations are sufficient for disease curing, which is 15 times more effective than other methods, but the group hope to boost this % in future. 

2. Better DNA Aptamer Technology
DNA aptamers can be artificially engineered to target and bind any molecular target in the body - proteins, viruses, bacteria, cells, tumours - but are limited by poorer binding-efficiency and instability due to enzymatic digestion. These two limiting factors have now been addressed http://www.a-star.edu.sg/Media/News/Press-Releases/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/4496.aspx with (i) the inclusion of an artificial base into the DNA that boosted binding ability by 100 times compared to existing aptamers, and (ii) the inclusion of a DNA-mini-hairpin structure that serves to restrict enzymatic digestion and boost lifetime in the body from hours to days. DNA aptamers like these could in theory be used instead of antibodies for therapeutic and diagnostic applications but are cheaper, quicker, and simpler to produce and obviate potential inflammatory side effects. 

3. Developing a Light-Effect-Transistor
Prototype light effect transistors have been developed with the aim of replacing standard field effect transistors in future chip designs https://www.technologyreview.com/s/600702/the-nanodevice-aiming-to-replace-the-field-effect-transistor/. A light effect transistor comprises a wire that conducts electricity when exposed to light and insulates when it is dark; a light-controlled switch in which light functions like a gate and with benefits including no reliance on dopant atoms and the ability to achieve smaller size dimensions to continue Moore’s Law. The demonstrations include semiconducting nanowires whose conduction changes by six orders of magnitude when switched, and can also function as an optical amplifier that performs logic operations when two or more laser beams are used. But the biggest unsolved question is how a chip would accurately address more than a billion nanowires with light? 

4. Rejuvenation via Senescent Cell & Amyloid Clearance 
First, venture-backed company Unity Biotechnology joins competition with Oisin Biotechnology aiming to develop and launch therapeutics that clear senescent cells from adult animals https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2016/02/25-median-life-extension-in-mice-via-senescent-cell-clearance-unity-biotechnology-founded-to-develop-therapies.php. Their latest work extends the median lifespan of mice by 25% and should help to attract additional funding and support for this approach; investors will want to get this into humans as soon as possible. And back in the lab another group finds a 35% lifespan extension by clearing senescent cells http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/mayo-clinic-researchers-extend-lifespan-by-as-much-as-35-percent-in-mice-2/. Second, a partnership between companies Pentraxin and GSK is slowly bearing fruit with clinically-tested drug therapies that very effectively clear amyloid (misfolded protein clumps that accumulate) deposits from tissues and body fluids, intended for Alzheimer’s and other diseases but providing a platform for this area of rejuvenation therapies https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2016/02/what-next-for-transthyretin-amyloid-clearance-therapies.php. Boosting mitophagy also rejuvenates cells to a more youthful state http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-02/nu-mst020316.php

5. Atomically Precise Materials and Devices
Structural DNA technology can self-assemble nanoparticles into diamond-shaped crystal lattices https://www.bnl.gov/newsroom/news.php?a=11810. The DNA forms the rigid frame of the material, while complementary DNA binding ensures the nanoparticles bind in specific locations, leading to a diamond lattice about 100 times larger than conventional diamond; interesting platform for novel materials development. Bacteria produce self-assembled microcompartments to concentrate enzymatic production of certain molecules, and these compartments are being used as templates to engineer variants with novel functions and molecular production capabilities https://newscenter.lbl.gov/2016/02/04/toward-nanoscale-chemical-factories/, slowly building a platform of contained molecular production machinery that might one day be introduced inside human cells for exmample. 

6. NASAs Integrated Photonics Modem
NASA is building the first fully integrated photonics modem, simplifying optical on-chip systems design, and reducing the size of the large prototype down to conventional system-on-chip scales http://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nasa-engineers-tapped-to-build-first-integrated-photonics-modem. The chip uses lasers to encode and transmit data at 10 - 100 times faster than equipment available today. While testing of the device in space won’t begin until 2020 we might see commercial applications of this earlier, particularly in data centers and Internet backbone lines. 

7. Electronic Nematicity Key in Superconductivity
New studies indicate that the phenomenon of electronic nematicity, in which electron clouds in a material snap into an aligned and directional order, is a generic property common to high-temperature superconductors https://uwaterloo.ca/stories/waterloo-physicists-discover-new-properties. The electrons involved in superconductivity form patterns that exhibit different symmetries that preferentially align in one direction and which can compete with, co-exist, or enhance superconductivity. Hopefully this understanding allows for the future design of higher-temperature superconductors. 

8. Dedicated Deep Learning Chips on Smartphones
Eyeriss is a newly designed and developed dedicated deep learning chip for use in smartphones and other low-power applications http://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/semiconductors/processors/a-deep-learning-ai-chip-for-your-phone. The chip is designed to allow these devices to run computationally demanding neural network algorithms quickly and efficiently on the device without offloading to the cloud, and using only one tenth of the energy of a typical mobile GPU. Agnostic to the type of neural network being run the chip can process image, sound, and other types of data as  needed and might also find deployment in autonomous platforms such as cars and drones. In related news Google’s DeepMind game-playing AI can now also navigate environments in first-person-shooters https://www.newscientist.com/article/2076552-google-deepmind-ai-navigates-a-doom-like-3d-maze-just-by-looking/ and I wonder if this can be transferred to robots to help in realworld environments, perhaps by using these dedicated chips. 

9. Graphene Lenses and Electrode Benefits
First, graphene has been formed into a clever fresnel lens by using a laser to pattern concentric rings of graphene oxide on its surface, and allowing optical focusing in the visible and infrared down to scales of 200nm http://www.swinburne.edu.au/news/latest-news/2016/01/focus-on-results.php. Second, graphene-coated electrodes turn out to be an excellent option for applications involving interfacing with neurons http://graphene-flagship.eu/graphene-based-interfaces-do-not-alter-target-nerve-cells. Finally, graphene cages formed around silicon anodes appear to enable higher capacity batteries that avoid the problem of cracking that such materials are usually limited by http://spectrum.ieee.org/nanoclast/semiconductors/materials/graphene-cages-cover-silicon-anodes-for-high-capacity-batteries

10. Flexiramics: Ceramics that Act Like Paper
A new material dubbed flexiramics is being developed and commercialised by a company called Eurekite http://arstechnica.com/science/2016/02/dutch-researchers-have-created-flexiramics-flexible-ceramics-for-circuit-boards/. Flexiramics appear to be a new class of materials that possess the mechanical properties of paper or thin textiles in being thin, foldable, and flexible while also exhibiting the properties of ceramics in being fireproof and nonconducting. The fabrics withstand 1,200 degrees Celsius for 24 hours without burning or melting. Printed PCBs will be the first application apparently but the possibilities are endless. 

SciTech Tip Jar: http://www.scitechdigest.net/p/donate.html 
7 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
Nailed it!
Thanks for the kind words on the Neuromancer drawing. I run a weekly digital sketching workshop at atelier stockholm, and tonight I wanted to give a little demo on using references effectively. I w...
1
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
Radical! You have to admire the elegant simplicity of the idea. Click through for the video.
 
Centriphone: A Skier Uses an iPhone and Sling to Film Dramatic ‎360° Footage of Himself While Skiing

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2016/02/centriphone/
1 comment on original post
8
1
Al Hunt's profile photo
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
These kids are adorbz! Also, apparently Japan is another planet. The level of cleanliness/sterilization is unreal. These kids could just as easily perform surgery as eat lunch after their daily routine. (The five second rule does not apply in Japan). Finally, good job, School, for setting up system were kids pitch in with cleaning, recycling, and even growing food for the school.
7
Chris Veerabadran's profile photoJen Spacey's profile photo
2 comments
 
amazing this is all done in 45 mins
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
Transporting heat as photons along a superconducting wire up to 1 meter long. I have no idea how this works, yet, but I'll keep my eyes open.

via +Peter Zsurka 
 
Scientists have made a breakthrough in physics. They succeeded in transporting heat maximally effectively 10,000 times further than ever before. The discovery may lead to a giant leap in the development of quantum computers.
View original post
6
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
Fear meeeeee!
Perhaps we shouldn't be surprised that a baby swordfish is extremely tiny, but for an animal that grows up to 10 feet long and weighs nearly 1,500 pounds, it's still astonishing to learn their offspring are so miniscule. PhD candidate Juan C. Levesque shot this amazing close-up of a ba
3 comments on original post
3
Add a comment...
Jesse's Collections
People
Have him in circles
6,628 people
Ryan Groten's profile photo
Sarah “Yoga Sandals” CS's profile photo
Shannon Watters's profile photo
Sean McLaughlin's profile photo
John Schubert's profile photo
Alex Wilks's profile photo
Chris Dedman's profile photo
Liz RistrettoFacts's profile photo
The Voice's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Oceanographer
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
I, for one ...
Education
  • Scripps Institution of Oceanography
    Oceanography, 2013
The Turkey Cobb on rosemary bread is not just a sandwich. It is the exemplar, the platonic ideal of what a sandwich should be. Just go. You'll see. Also good is the foccacia and the chocolate chunk cookies. I agree that the service is a little slow, sometimes. But I'm always happy when my order arrives, so I don't mind.
Quality: ExcellentAppeal: ExcellentService: Very Good
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago
2 reviews
Map
Map
Map