Profile

Cover photo
Jesse Powell
Attended Scripps Institution of Oceanography
6,628 followers|1,030,148 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotosVideosReviews

Stream

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
Well, that answers that!
 
Eggs came first. Question answered by phylogenetic tree.

(Original source of photo unknown to me. Google reverse image search was not helpful today)
16 comments on original post
8
1
Bill DeWitt's profile photo
 
I always assumed they meant a chicken egg, and without a doubt, something that was not quite a chicken, laid an egg that was not quite a chicken's egg, and out of it came a chicken. The chicken came first, then the chicken eggs.
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
"...Eduardo Porter ‏/@portereduardo 3h
From Hilary to Trump, promises to restore manufacturing greatness ring hollow. Manufacturing is over. Everywhere.
"---
As the candidates for president grapple with a vanishing manufacturing base, their solutions ignore the reality of an irrevocable change in the global economy.
1 comment on original post
3
Runivis Roan's profile photoJusten Robertson's profile photo
2 comments
 
Dang, just another cactus.
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Upset to see such an intelligent animal in captivity? Help the orcas by signing this petition: <a rel="noreferrer nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://action.sumofus.org/a/seaworld-orcas-captivity-california-ban-blackfish/?akid=4483.3424288._61oiF&rd=1&sub=mtl&t=4">http://action.sumofus.org/a/seaworld-orcas-captivity-california-ban-blackfish/?akid=4483.3424288._61oiF&rd=1&sub=mtl&t=4</a>
1 comment on original post
6
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
10
1
Ann Powell's profile photo
 
Awk
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
The GOP... a national example of the Dunning–Kruger effect.
16
1
elizabeth Berkhoff's profile photo
 
I saw one that said men should refrain from having intercourse to lower the chances of abortions 
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
The banks have lots of reserves to cover their deposits, just not cash reserves. They have 6 cents cash on hand for every $100 in deposits. To cover the rest, the Federal Reserve would need to print more cash, lots of it. The Federal Reserve would need to print $2.5 Trillion. Considering the Bureau of Engraving and Printing only prints about $200 Billion per year, it would take years of printing to cover existing deposits.

Thus, if there is a crisis, you aren't getting your cash back. You will be using your debit cards spending 1s and 0s of whatever the banks and government say exists.

I've maintained all along that the Economy is an illusion. The only thing that matters is providing enough electronic money to ensure people don't riot, and not providing to much of it so that prices don't get out of control. The name of the game is planned scarcity, in order to keep people in line. 
 
What Happens If Everybody Pulls Their Money Out Of The Bank Today? 

(there's 6 cents for every $100 dollars of deposits that you have at the bank.)
View original post
3
Add a comment...
In his circles
989 people
Have him in circles
6,628 people
Angelo Varlotta's profile photo
Jeff Croff's profile photo
Kevin O'Malley's profile photo
Rafael Pérez Pastor's profile photo
Vinay Pandey's profile photo
Cynthia Bradbury's profile photo
preston casey's profile photo
Shannon Watters's profile photo
Julio Amigo's profile photo

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
The follow-on to Bernie Sanders' progressive movement may have a found a focus here.
22 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
Yep.
39
8
Jen Spacey's profile photo
 
industry standard
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
That's a wrap!
4
Runivis Roan's profile photo
 
Plussed just for the vaporwave! lol
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
6
Runivis Roan's profile photoSnaps McCoy's profile photo
2 comments
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
Another thing I'll never get to see. Thanks, Humanity!
 
"And then we wept."

The chatter of gossip distracts us from the really big story, the Anthropocene: the new geological era we are bringing about.   Pay attention for a minute.  Most of the Great Barrier Reef, the world's largest coral reef system, now looks like a ghostly graveyard.  

Most corals are colonies of tiny genetically identical animals called polyps.   Over centuries, their skeletons build up reefs, which are havens for many kinds of sea life.  Some polyps catch their own food using stingers.  But most get their food by symbiosis!  They cooperate with algae called zooxanthellae.  These algae get energy from the sun's light.   They actually live inside the polyps, and provide them with food.  Most of the color of a coral reef comes from these zooxanthellae.

For reasons I don't understand, when a polyp gets stressed, it can kick out the zooxanthellae living inside it.   This happens when the sea water gets too hot.  Without the zooxanthellae, the polyp is transparent and the coral's white skeleton is revealed - as you see here.  We say the coral is bleached.

After they bleach, the polyps begin to starve.  If conditions return to normal fast enough, the zooxanthellae may come back.   If they don't, the coral will die.

The Great Barrier Reef, off the northeast coast of Australia, contains over 2,900 reefs and 900 islands.  It's huge: 2,300 kilometers long, with an area of about 340,000 square kilometers.  It can be seen from outer space!

With global warming, this reef has been starting to bleach.  Parts of it bleached in 1998 and again in 2002.  But this year, with a big El Niño pushing world temperatures to new record highs, is the worst.

Scientists have being flying over the Great Barrier Reef to study the damage, and divers have looked at some of the reefs in detail.  Of the 522 reefs surveyed in the northern section, over 80% are severely bleached and less than 1% are not bleached at all.    Of 226 reefs surveyed in the central section, 33% are severely bleached and 10% are not bleached.  Of 163 reefs in the southern section, 1% are severely bleached and 25% are not bleached. 

The top expert on coral reefs in Australia, Terry Hughes, wrote:

“I showed the results of aerial surveys of bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef to my students.  And then we wept.”

Some of the bleached reefs may recover.  But as oceans continue to warm, the prospects look bleak.  The last big El Niño was in 1998.  With a lot of hard followup work, scientists showed that in the end, 16% of the world’s corals died in that event. 

This year is quite a bit hotter.

So, global warming is not a problem for the future: it's a problem now.   It's not good enough to cut carbon emissions eventually.   We've got to get serious now.  

I need to recommit myself to this.  For example, I need to stop flying around to conferences.  I've cut back, but I need to do much better.  Future generations, living in the damaged world we're creating, will not have much sympathy for our excuses.
47 comments on original post
6
2
Mark Bruce's profile photoJesse Powell's profile photo
2 comments
 
Thanks, +Mark Bruce! I missed the paragraph about the southern and central sections. I feel much relieved (though still greatly saddened at the damage in the northern section). I better get over there and enjoy all the beautiful things your country has to offer!
Add a comment...

Jesse Powell

Shared publicly  - 
 
Passing the Anti-Corruption Act at the state level makes sense.
4
Runivis Roan's profile photoJakub Kotyza's profile photo
2 comments
 
this is so internet idealistic :) it might even work :D
Add a comment...
Jesse's Collections
People
In his circles
989 people
Have him in circles
6,628 people
Angelo Varlotta's profile photo
Jeff Croff's profile photo
Kevin O'Malley's profile photo
Rafael Pérez Pastor's profile photo
Vinay Pandey's profile photo
Cynthia Bradbury's profile photo
preston casey's profile photo
Shannon Watters's profile photo
Julio Amigo's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Oceanographer
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
I, for one ...
Education
  • Scripps Institution of Oceanography
    Oceanography, 2013
The Turkey Cobb on rosemary bread is not just a sandwich. It is the exemplar, the platonic ideal of what a sandwich should be. Just go. You'll see. Also good is the foccacia and the chocolate chunk cookies. I agree that the service is a little slow, sometimes. But I'm always happy when my order arrives, so I don't mind.
Quality: ExcellentAppeal: ExcellentService: Very Good
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago
2 reviews
Map
Map
Map