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Jesse Powell
Attended Scripps Institution of Oceanography
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Jesse Powell

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This BOD looks like it was chosen with one goal in mind: Disrupt. Everything.
 
Announcing the New Foundation Board and Executive Director: https://blog.ethereum.org/2015/07/30/announcing-new-foundation-board-executive-director
After an intensive recruitment period, the Ethereum Foundation has selected an Executive Director and named three members to the Board of Directors. This is a new organizational structure, which will allow us to focus on our next phase of development. The Ethereum Foundation is a not for profit (‘Stiftung’) organization registered in Switzerland, and has …
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Yay!
 
New ethereum.org Frontier site: tutorials, explanations and happy robots - https://www.ethereum.org
Ethereum is a decentralized platform for applications that run exactly as programmed without any chance of fraud, censorship or third-party interference.
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I want to know more!
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And BOOM! 
Bit-addressable, non-volatile, works like RAM, 'coming 2016'
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+Jesse Powell I can't wait till a genuine virtual assistant is created. With that much memory and speed of access we could see our mobiles becoming very interesting indeed. 

In the article they mention VR games, but I'm thinking VR real life is what will really transform our world, and it could come very quickly now if price doesn't keep this out of our hands. 
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Storm in San Francisco Bay by Michael Delman
https://1x.com/photo/167535
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This explains why so much of supermarket produce tastes like cardboard
 
I don't know if folks on here actually follow my research background, but it has been extremely variable. For the last 10 years it has been mostly agricultural research (aquaculture to citrus pathology). Now I do mostly sensory science, and the psychology involved it this area of research is like nothing I've encountered before. People experience food in ways others can't even imagine and is difficult to quantify.
My boss has worked with the researchers in this article and when I read it she gave me some fascinating background on tomato breeding and consumer acceptance.
Tomato lovers, rejoice, for science has achieved the impossible: the perfect supermarket tomato. The Garden Gem won’t bruise during shipping, it resists many of the major diseases that regularly decimate tomato crops, and it is a flesh-producing powerhouse, turning out up to 22 pounds of tomatoes per plant, which is...
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More trees please!

via +Karen Peck 
A very large study in Toronto shows that an additional 11 trees along a neighborhood street improves health in a way comparable to "being 1.4 years younger."
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Time keeps marching on.
 
Father and son take same photo for 27 years. The series is giving us some mighty strong feels. http://boingboing.net/2015/07/30/father-and-son-take-same-photo.html
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“We realise that people have been victimised by superstition so building mass awareness is critical, but I am very hopeful that we will see a bloodless festival in 2019,” Gautam told AFP.

That's a good way of describing it.
Estimated 200,000 animals killed in Gadhimai festival which is held every five years and attracts 2.5 million Hindu worshippers
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"When the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pie..."

The reddit comments, my sides!

http://www.reddit.com/r/pics/comments/3evxmt/when_the_moon_hits_your_eye_like_a_big_pizza_pie/
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Brave guy, how does he know that creature won't bite him?
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So freakin fast!
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Poor puppy just can't keep up.
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A wide variety of sci-tech this week from +Mark Bruce . The item that really captured my attention was Deep Genomics, or using deep learning to make sense of genomics data. This will reap huge rewards in the future. 
 
SciTech #ScienceSunday Digest - 30/2015.
Permalink here: http://www.scitechdigest.net/2015/07/brain-inspired-networking-scene.html 

Brain inspired networking, Scene description, Bacteria vs cancer, Deep learning genetics, Sophisticated DNA origami, Graphene on silicon, Viral immune aging, Stretchy conducting fibers, Biomimicking solar cells, Useful metal foams. 

1. Better Brain-Inspired Networking
New fundamental insights into how the growing brain develops neural networks through variable rates of synaptic pruning have led to the development of algorithms for building efficient computer networking architectures http://www.salk.edu/news/pressrelease_details.php?press_id=2096. Simulations of such networks suggest that they are more efficient than current computer networks, allowing more direct information flows, multiple paths to reach destinations, and reduced risk of network failure. 

2. Image Recognition and Scene Description
Here’s an interesting and accessible update article on Stanford’s NeuralTalk algorithm that can analyse images, recognise objects in them, and describe the scene in natural language with regards to the relation between different objects and their number http://www.theverge.com/2015/7/17/8985699/stanford-neural-networks-image-recognition-google-study. This work continues to be developed and there are now far more examples of its use; it isn’t perfect and doesn’t yet work in all situations reliably but the results are impressive nonetheless and realtime relevant applications such as for autonomous vehicle operation are also being explored. In related news object recognition for robots takes a step forward http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2015/object-recognition-robots-0724

3. Bacteria that Kill Cancer Cells
An interesting twist on modern cancer immunotherapies involves the use of engineered bacterial strains that attack tumour cells by entering them and subsequently thrive and replicate in the low-oxygen environments that are usually present http://www.newsweek.com/programming-bacteria-kill-cancer-cells-355474. This whole field began with the observation that surgical tumour-removal patients were more likely to recover if they developed post-surgical infection. Engineered bacterial strains are designed to retain efficiency while reducing overall human toxicity. It’s also interesting to think about this in the sense of a lethal form of endosymbiosis. 

4. Deep Learning: Genetics and Sketching
A couple of interesting deep learning advances this week. First, Deep Genomics launches to offer advanced personalised medicine and genome analysis services to better predict the consequences of certain mutations on a person’s health http://www.deepgenomics.com/news/2015/7/22/meet-deep-genomics-a-start-up-bringing-the-power-of-deep-learning-to-genomics. Second, the Sketch-a-Net system demonstrated that it can correctly identify the subject of a line-drawn sketch better than a human can http://www.qmul.ac.uk/media/news/items/se/159633.html. In related news deep learning can recognise faces from just thermal images http://www.technologyreview.com/view/539656/deep-neural-nets-can-now-recognize-your-face-in-thermal-images/

5. Increasing Sophistication of DNA Origami
Improvements in computer aided design of 3D DNA origami structures now make it easier than ever to create custom, atomically-precise, 3D DNA origami materials http://www.theverge.com/2015/7/22/9013851/dna-nanotechnology-origami-3d-printing-automation-bunny. The algorithms will take an arbitrary 3D shape, optimise the interlocking DNA scaffolding to realise the shape at the nanoscale and determine the best DNA sequences that need to be produced in order to form the structures; in the example demonstration these included bunny rabbits, nanotubes, toruses, humanoids, icosahedra and other things. In the same week another group also pushed the boundaries with their 2D and 3D DNA origami patterns http://phys.org/news/2015-07-rare-built-dna-emerge.html.

6. Graphene-on-Silicon Innovations
A new wafer-scale ion-implantation synthesis method has demonstrated a simple and scalable way to produce uniform graphene sheets on silicon, potentially enabling integrated circuits that can more readily dissipate heat http://phys.org/news/2015-07-easy-scalable-method-graphene-silicon.html. In other work graphene on silicon creates a near frictionless surface in which two surfaces can slide past each other smoothly when separated by nanodiamond clusters that encase themselves in graphene nanoscrolls http://phys.org/news/2015-07-simulations-near-frictionless-material.html

7. Why Tackle a Virus that Causes No Symptoms
Infection and its recurrence by cytomegalovirus (CMV), which is prevalent throughout most of the population, causes few if any symptoms and so might be innocuous. But chronic life-long infection by this virus activates the immune system on an on-going basis and this leads to aging of the immune system, the accumulation of damage, and contributes to the reduction of immune efficiency with age https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2015/07/immune-profiling-the-contribution-of-cytomegalovirus-to-aging.php. So there are good reasons for developing therapies and interventions towards such a seemingly harmless virus. 

8. Stretchy, Electrically-Conducting Fibers
A new fiber material has been developed that can reversibly stretch to over 14 times its length while electrical conductivity increases by 200 times when fully stretched http://www.utdallas.edu/news/2015/7/23-31627_Scientists-Stretch-Electrically-Conducting-Fibers-_story-wide.html?WT.mc_id=NewsHomePageCenterColumn. The base fibers consist of a rubber core wrapped in carbon nanotube fibers, and these are engineered with a deliberate buckled structure that helps provide the beneficial properties. The group hope to develop applications in artificial muscles and machine actuators. 

9. Biomimicry Improves Solar Cells
A new solar cell design utilises a surface that mimics the texture and structure of the compound eyes of moths, albeit at much smaller feature sizes of 20nm, in order to exploit anti-reflective properties http://phys.org/news/2015-07-artificial-moth-eyes-silicon-solar.html. The surfaces are self-assembled from block copolymers and effectively reduce light reflections to less than 1% across all visible and near-infrared wavelengths of light. The self-assembly process appears scalable; hopefully this can be applied to commercial grade solar cells and other materials. 

10. Useful Properties for Metal Foams
Lightweight composite metal foam materials are effective at both blocking a range of radiation sources (x-rays, gamma rays, neutrons) and also absorbing high-impact collision energy https://news.ncsu.edu/2015/07/rabiei-foam-rays-2015/. Initial tests were very promising but the group believe further optimisation and improvements are possible, mainly with their lead candidate comprising stainless steel with small amounts of tungsten. Applications include nuclear safety and transportation, space exploration, and medical devices - particularly those that utilise radiation. 

Archive: http://www.scitechdigest.net/2015/07/brain-inspired-networking-scene.html
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Parked here for later.
 
The results are in for India's 2011 Basic Income experiment, they included an increase in labor, nutrition, educational performance, financial liquidity, small-scale investment, and a reduction in debt.
Major points from the article:
From the article:
"We have much more analysis to do, but as the conference showed t
the story is fairly clear. Before mentioning a few findings, note that contrary to some assertions, a majority did not prefer subsidies (covering rice, wheat, kerosene and sugar), and as a result of the experience of basic incomes more came to prefer cash to subsidies." Eleven results stand out:

1. Many used money to improve their housing, latrines, walls and roofs, and to take precautions against malaria.

2. Nutrition was improved, particularly in scheduled caste (SC) and scheduled tribe (ST) households. Perhaps the most important finding was the significant improvement in the average weight-for-age of young children (World Health Organization z-score), and more so among girls.

3. There was a shift from ration shops to markets, made possible by increased financial liquidity. This improved diets, with more fresh vegetables and fruit, rather than the narrow staple of stale subsidized grains, often mixed with stones in the bags acquired through the shops of the Public Distribution System (PDS), the government-regulated food security system. Better diets helped to account for improved health and energy of children, linked to a reduced incidence of seasonal illness and more regular taking of medicines, as well as greater use of private healthcare. Public services must improve!

4. Better health helped to explain the improved school attendance and performance (figure 1), which was also the result of families being able to buy things like shoes and pay for transport to school. It is important that families were taking action themselves. There was no need for expensive conditionality. People treated as adults learn to be adults; people treated as children remain childlike. No conditionality is morally acceptable unless you would willingly have it applied to yourself.

5. The scheme had positive equity outcomes. In most respects, there was a bigger positive effect for disadvantaged groups – lower-caste families, women, and those with disabilities. Suddenly, they had their own money, which gave them a stronger bargaining position in the household. Empowering the disabled is a sadly neglected aspect of social policy.

6. The basic income grants led to small-scale investments – more and better seeds, sewing machines, establishment of little shops, repairs to equipment, and so on. This was associated with more production, and thus higher incomes. The positive effect on production and growth means that the elasticity of supply would offset inflationary pressure due to any increased demand for basic food and goods. It was encouraging to see the revival of local strains of grain that had been wiped out by the PDS.

7. Contrary to the skeptics, the grants led to more labor and work (figure 2). But the story is nuanced. There was a shift from casual wage labor to more own-account (self-employed) farming and business activity, with less distress-driven out-migration. Women gained more than men.

8. There was an unanticipated reduction in bonded labor (naukar, gwala). This has huge positive implications for local development and equity.

9. Those with basic income were more likely to reduce debt and less likely to go into greater debt. One reason was that they had less need to borrow for short-term purposes, at exorbitant interest rates of 5% a month. Indeed, the only locals to complain about the pilots were moneylenders.

10. One cannot overestimate the importance of financial liquidity in low-income communities. Money is a scarce and monopolized commodity, giving moneylenders and officials enormous power. Bypassing them can help combat corruption. Even though families were desperately poor, many managed to put money aside, and thus avoid going into deeper debt when financial crises hit due to illness or bereavements.

11. The policy has transformative potential for both families and village communities. The whole is greater than the sum of the parts. Unlike food subsidy schemes that lock economic and power structures in place, entrenching corrupt dispensers of BPL (Below Poverty Line) cards, rations, and the numerous government schemes that supposedly exist, basic income grants gave villagers more control of their lives, and had beneficial equity and growth effects.


[Credit to reddit user u/wompt for finding the article and analysis 
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