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Jess Sloss
Worked at The Feldman Agency
Attended Capilano University
Lived in Vancouver
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Jess Sloss

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Jess Sloss hung out with 10 people. <a class='ot-hashtag' href='https://plus.google.com/s/%23hangoutsonair'>#hangoutsonair</a>Jeremie Rodger, Joel Sherlock, Anthony Codispoti, Todd Herman, Chris Dildy, Joe Player, Michael Kim, Ryan Moran, Scott S, and Fernando Fonseca
Brotherhood Hangout: Going Viral etc.
Jess Sloss and 10 others participated
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Jess Sloss

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US musicians should check this out.
 
Through Tuesday, it's free for US musicians to build a Google Play store page using the Google Play artist hub! You (or a talented indie musician you know) can upload your music to Google Play for millions of new fans to discover and purchase, without paying the registration fee (normally $25), thanks in part to FanBridge. Learn more at http://play.google.com/artists.

What are some of your favorite independent musicians in your town?
Go direct to fans on Google Play to distribute your albums. Build your artist page, set your retail prices, sell your original songs.
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Google really making a move with Google Play! Great resource for artists and music lovers
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"Part of the appeal of paywalls, even in the face of their economic ineffectiveness, was preserving this sense that a coupon-clipper and a news junkie were both just customers, people whose motivations the paper could serve in general, without having to understand in particular."
Newspapers, Paywalls, and Core Users. This may be the year where newspapers finally drop the idea of treating all news as a product, and all readers as customers. One early sign of this shift was the ...
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I'm a huge reader fan. Chris ( Google Reader's founder ) shares his thoughts on the recent, and controversial, changes.
Chris Wetherell originally shared:
 
There’s been some interesting critical discussions of some design and product changes within Google Reader recently and I’ve kind of stayed out of it since I’m heads down on making big changes elsewhere. But I grabbed a few minutes, and I’d like to share a few notes I’ve written about it…

• If Reader continues being understaffed, absorbed, or is eliminated then the internal culture at Google will adjust to a newly perceived lack of opportunity for building things that are treasured. No one knows what effect this will actually have, though. The response could be tiny.

• Technology will route around the diminishment or disappearance of Reader. Even if this means something other than feeds are being used.

It’s a tough call. Google’s leaders may be right to weaken or abandon Reader. I feel more people should acknowledge this.

• However, saying “no” to projects doesn’t make you Steve Jobs if you say no to inspiring things. It’s the discernment that’s meaningful, not the refusal. Anyone can point their thumb to the ground.

• The shareable social object of subscribe-able items makes Reader’s network unique and the answer to why change is painful for many of its users is because no obvious alternative network exists with exactly that object. The social object of Google+ is…nearly anything and its diffuse model is harder to evaluate or appreciate. The value of a social network seems to map proportionally to the perceived value of its main object. (Examples: sharing best-of-web links on Metafilter or sharing hi-res photos on Flickr or sharing video art on Vimeo or sharing statuses on Twitter/Facebook or sharing questions on Quora.) If you want a community with stronger ties, provide more definition to your social object.

Reader exhibits the best unpaid representation I’ve yet seen of a consumer’s relationship to a content producer. You pay for HBO? That’s a strong signal. Consuming free stuff? Reader’s model was a dream. Even better than Netflix. You get affinity (which has clear monetary value) for free, and a tracked pattern of behavior for the act of iterating over differently sourced items – and a mechanism for distributing that quickly to an ostensible audience which didn’t include social guilt or gameification – along with an extensible, scalable platform available via commonly used web technologies – all of which would be an amazing opportunity for the right product visionary.

• Reader is (was?) for information junkies; not just tech nerds. This market totally exists and is weirdly under-served (and is possibly affluent).

• The language for decisions based on deferred value is all about sight, which I find beautiful (and apt for these discussions). People are asking if Google is seeing the forest for the trees. I’d offer that Google is viewing this particular act-of-seeing as a distraction.

• Reader will be an interesting footnote in tech history. That’s neat and that’s enough for me; wasn’t it fun that we were able to test if it worked?

• Google is choosing to define itself by making excellent products in obvious markets that serve hundreds of millions of people. This is good. A great company with evident self-consciousness that even attempts to consider ethical consequences at that scale is awesome. But this is a perfect way to avoid the risk of creating entirely new markets which often go through a painful not-yet-serving-hundreds-of-millions period and which require a dream, some dreamers, and not-at-all-measurable luck. Seemingly Google+ could be viewed as starting a new market, but I'd argue that it mainly stands a chance of improving on the value unlocked by other social networks, which is healthy and a good thing, but which doesn't require an investigation into why it's valuable. That's self-evident in a Facebook world. Things like Reader still need a business wizard to help make sense of the value there.

• If Google is planning on deprecating Reader then its leaders are deliberately choosing to not defend decisions that fans or users will find indefensible. This would say a lot about how they would communicate to the marketplace for social apps and about how they'd be leading their workforce. If this is actually occurring and you’re internal to Google – it's ok, I can imagine you’d be feeling that these decisions are being made obtusely “just because” or since “we need to limit our scope to whatever we can cognitively or technically handle” or such but I’d offer that maybe it's needed for driving focus for a large team? I suppose sacrificing pet projects, public responsibility, and transparency could be worth it if the end is a remarkable dream fulfilled. But what if the thing you’re driving everyone toward isn’t the iPod but is instead the Zune? So just make sure it's not that.

• The following sentence is unfair but it's a kind of myth and fog that has been drifting into view about 'em: Google seems to be choosing efforts like SketchUp over Reader. I doubt there's a common calculus, but it’s now harder for Google's users to really know how important it is that many millions of people are using a product every day when Google is deciding its evolution and fate.
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As a strong reader fan I have my own opinions, but I liked his points and agree. In the end, some other RSS reader will take it's place.

Ideally, I could just import that feed into my G+ stream. That's pretty much what my Facebook turned into anyway...

The information junkie is a surprisingly large market. Look at the reaction to iPad's Flipboard. Why isn't there anything on desktops for that experience?
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Interesting article published on a more interesting new tool (smore pages)
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20 years eh? ....
Amanda Blain originally shared:
 
Know who this is?

That's right......

*This 20 year old is the baby from the cover of Nirvana's Nevermind Album*

Continue regular google+ scrolling.
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Jess Sloss

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Not as far off as you might think..
 
We think technology should work for you—to be there when you need it and get out of your way when you don’t.

A group of us from Google[x] started Project Glass to build this kind of technology, one that helps you explore and share your world, putting you back in the moment. We’re sharing this information now because we want to start a conversation and learn from your valuable input. So we took a few design photos to show what this technology could look like and created a video to demonstrate what it might enable you to do.

Please follow along as we share some of our ideas and stories. We’d love to hear yours, too. What would you like to see from Project Glass?

+Babak Parviz +Steve Lee +Sebastian Thrun
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Koushik Dutta (Koush) originally shared:
 
The Unintended Effects of Driverless Cars

Google has been working on driverless cars for a few years now. The obvious selling point is that the cars will be much safer without a human behind the wheel.

Currently, a car spends 96% of its time idle. Compare that with planes which spend almost their entire lifetime in operation/airborne. Idle planes aren't making money, and they need to recoup their hefty $120M price tag. There is an unforgiving economic incentive to make sure it is always in use.

The proliferation of driverless cars will have a similar effect. Cars will spend less time idle: why would a household buy 2 (or even 3) cars, when they only need 1? Ride to work, then send the car home to your spouse. Need to go grocery shopping, but your kid also needs a ride to a soccer game? No problem, a driverless car can handle that.

What will begin as households cutting back to a single car, will expand. Why would a family need an entire car to themselves? That's crazy! It may start as extended family in the same area sharing cars, then neighbors sharing cars, and then entire apartment/condo complexes in cities offering driverless cars bundled into their HOA/rent.[2]

The operating percent of a car will go from 4% to that 96%. But back to my leading statement: there are unintended consequences. Parked cars will be a relic from the past. What happens to car insurance prices if a driver is no longer part of the equation? And if cars are receiving 20 times more actual use, that would imply that there would be 20 times less cars sold.[1] This is the kind of disruptive change that can reshape the automotive industry. The recent GM/Chrysler bailout may have been for naught.[3]





[1] Of course, this isn't exactly the case, as the cars would need to be replaced more often due to nonstop usage, but the point stands.
[2] Hell, I'd share a car with my condo complex. I currently don't own a car, I walk or take taxis basically everywhere.
[3] Of course, car companies realize this. And I can guarantee you, they will lobby against driverless cars.
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Combine it with a zipcar-style car sharing system, and you could order a car that would come to your door, just like you do with a taxi.
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How and when people share, via addthis [infographic]
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A tale of two agency social media models

"a social media program that blends customer acquisition and increased buy-rate with facilitating WOM and activating hobbyist communities looks VERY different from a social media program whose objective is merely to “build and fill.”
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Fascinating. Geist and friends have put together a sample of some of the special interest group submissions around Bill C-32 ( Online copyright ).

"virtually every education group and provincial education minister in Canada - along with major businesses and retailers - have joined with librarians, archivists, and documentary film makers to oppose the government's position on digital locks." -Geist

He also lists other industry suggestions including,


- Canadian Federation of Musicians want a graduated response system for ISPs
many creator groups want to eliminate fair dealing for education and the user-generated content exception

-Project Gutenberg recommends creating a safe harbour provision for orphan works

-SOCAN wants to eliminate the addition parody and satire for fair dealing as well as limit the scope of ISP safe harbours with possible joint liability with the copyright infringer

and more, interesting read!
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512 people
brian sabbeth's profile photo
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Work
Occupation
Key decision maker at Jess Sloss
Employment
  • The Feldman Agency
    Director of Digital Media, 2011 - 2013
  • Giant Ant Media; Video and Social Media Producers
    Digital Communications Strategy, 2008 - 2009
  • Cypress Mountain Recreations
    2002 - 2008
  • Farm Digital Advisors
    Communications Advisor, 2009 - 2011
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Vancouver
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Social Business Strategy from Vancouver BC
Introduction
Social Business Strategist passionate about new media, social commerce and education. 

Reach out and connect, find me on Twitter, Linked In and Facebook
Bragging rights
In the past year I’ve driven a TukTuk across Indonesia, received roadside chiropractic services from a Mexican Cartel Leader, helped two poets reach over 14 million new fans and so much more.
Education
  • Capilano University
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@thattallguy
Used to love going here but after hearing that they allegedly haven't been paying employees properly, giving them breaks and even assaulting them, I've stopped and suggest you do too. A quick google will show news stories related to the allegations. Until they right the wrong or get new owners, I'm done eating here.
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