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Jesper Dangaard Brouer
Worked at Red Hat Software
Attended University of Copenhagen
Lives in Denmark
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Jesper Dangaard Brouer

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LWN is cool
 
Would you like to write full-time for one of the smartest and most interesting audiences out there?  LWN is currently looking for a new editor/writer, and we would like to hear from you.  Please see the job description below and drop us a note if you'd like to be a part of LWN.
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Jesper Dangaard Brouer

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I'm amazed by those numbers!
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LWN coved my Network Performance BoF here:
http://lwn.net/SubscriberLink/676806/c6a45080596ed088/

Very positive review!!! :-)))

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100Gbit/s is finally here - in my home!

New toys arrived today: 3x 100Gbit/s Mellanox ConnectX-4 dual port NICs

Thanks to +Mellanox Technologies for these Engineering Samples!

http://www.mellanox.com/page/products_dyn?product_family=204&mtag=connectx_4_en_card

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Cool .. Saw your lecture on emulating 100Gbps on older NICs .. Eagerly awaiting for your results on these new NICs :)
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On respect versus merit.

I've recently seen a few typical Open Source Collisions happen and being involved in it partially as well. As I'm a fairly pragmatic person I tend to shrug it off and focus on the work at hand, but there are always a few people around that can't understand that respect and merit are orthogonal.

Any new person who starts out doing Open Source should be met with the utmost respect. They have absolutely no merit to begin with, and others should encourage them and show the beginner mistakes in their work. The new people should treat experienced people as you would treat any good teacher: without any significant more respect than anyone else(!). Poke them, ask them, prod them for answers and explanations, but certainly do not go easy on your mentors - they are there not to sit on a throne and rule, but to guide everyone to do better.

Any experienced person should treat new contributors with respect, but treat their code for what it's worth. No need to get salty if it's bad. Just say "It's terrible" and leave it at that.

But that's where things go wrong. If you, as an experienced developer, fail to explain why a submission is wrong or misinformed, you're not giving someone the education or knowledge that you have, and you're guilty of depriving them of a chance to learn.

Now what I've noticed is that there seem to be many capable, experienced OSS contributors who lavish in merit and destroy their own respect, by ignoring this advice. These aren't business critical projects, but nonetheless it matters to a lot of people, so things get heated pretty quickly.

I've now seen two out of control spirals of disrespect end in people leaving. For no good reason than that the involved senior people entirely confuse merit and respect, and think that they are interchangeable.

It starts with reviews ending up saltier and shorter, especially for reviews from newer contributors. It ends with someone giving up, and sadly it's usually the newer people that give up, even though the potential that they will contribute more and better code in the future is often far more likely than that the merit-soaker is coming back to do actual coding.

So, takeaways for those that recognize the situation? If you don't code anymore in a project, don't become the grumpy reviewer. Let others take over. Stay constructive and technical, and teach instead of criticize. Never attack a person, ever.

Yes, there are indeed plenty of public OSS figures out there that violate these guidelines, and it's inexcusable, really. And totally not needed, either. I've most certainly have been on the wrong side as well, for sure, in the past. I hope I've made up for it, though, and intend to improve where I can.
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Open Source Days 2016 takes off in less than 24 hours.

Whether you are a newcomer to open source technology or an experienced member of the community there are a lot of interesting talks to follow.

Come listen to +Michael Widenius (CTO at +MariaDB Database and founding member of MySQL AB) talk about the benefits of open source and how to create a successful company producing open source software, graciously sponsored by my employer, Casalogic.

Or how about learning about the challenges the Linux kernel network stack is facing with network speeds reaching 100 Gbit/s with +Jesper Dangaard Brouer.

https://opensourcedays.org/
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Network Performance BoF slides from NetDev 1.1, avail here: http://people.netfilter.org/hawk/presentations/NetDev1.1_2016/net_performance_BoF.pdf Four screenshots from that pdf below. (via +Jesper Dangaard Brouer) 
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Try using OpenFastPath. I think it provides twice the performance using hooks and Udp forwarding. It will also scale with the number of cores.
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FCC is hurting its own cause.

Manufactures will provide firmware that runs at the maximum FCC allowed radio transmit power.

Research in this area indicate WiFi routers should instead dynamically reduce their radio transmit power. Thus, causing far less radio interference than today. See: "Minstrel-Blues" http://www.linuxplumbersconf.org/2014/ocw/sessions/2439

That research is base upon the ability re-flash existing WiFi routers, and based on HW that had a none-locked-down wifi firmware.

Yes, I like Linus also co-signed +Dave Taht letter to the FCC.
 
Let's see how the whole FCC vs router upgrading thing turns out, but I'm happy to have been contacted by Dave Taht & co about at least trying to clarify that locking down WiFi routers isn't the answer..

It's not just that the various open router projects allow people to play with - and fix - their routers: the upgradable WiFi routers have also been instrumental in making it much easier to experiment with queuing algorithms and IPv6 etc.
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Really cool talk about benchmarking (you can learn a lot)
...this reminds me of what I do daily to the kernel code ;-)
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Work
Occupation
Linux Kernel Developer
Employment
  • Red Hat Software
    Principal Software Engineer
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Denmark
Previously
Copenhagen - Montreal - Auckland
Story
Tagline
Linux Kernel Developer in the network area, with a passion for scalability and performance
Education
  • University of Copenhagen
    Computer science, 2005
Basic Information
Gender
Male