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Jeffrey Lapin
63,578 followers -
Attorney- Owner of Lapin Law Offices - Personal Injury Lawyer - Workers' Compensation Lawyer - Disability Lawyer
Attorney- Owner of Lapin Law Offices - Personal Injury Lawyer - Workers' Compensation Lawyer - Disability Lawyer

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Cazneaux Tree and Milky Way
[Click on image for full view]
Ian: "Freezing under clear skies -2 degrees C at the Cazneaux Tree with Wilpena Pound, South Australia, in the background. The scene was lit by the Moon of about 50% brightness near setting. A tree adjacent to the Cazneaux tree makes this composition hard to achieve! A cold and still night, normally there are a lot of kangaroos in the area, but maybe it was too cold for them."

The Cazneaux Tree, also known as Cazneaux's Tree, is a Eucalyptus camaldulensis or river red gum that was made famous by the photographer Harold Cazneaux. It is located near Wilpena Pound in the Flinders Ranges of South Australia. With a height of 29 meters (95 ft) and a circumference at the base of 11.4 meters (37 ft) the tree dominates the otherwise flat arid plateau composed primarily of grasslands. (Source: Wikipedia)

Credit: Ian Inverarity
Location: Wilpena Pound, South Australia
Image Date: June 20, 2018

+Commission for Dark Skies

Technical details: This is a 5 shot vertical panorama, processed and stitched in Lightroom with a daylight white balance, Sigma lens

#Astronomy #Panorama #Science #Space #Stars #MilkyWay #Galaxy #CazneauxTree #Cosmos #Universe #SolarSystem #Astrophotography #Photography #Art #Earth #WilpenaPound #Australia #STEM #Education
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The Martian Glitter Path
Alan: "Mars is rising and shining a reflected red glitter path on a prairie pond, on June 19, 2018. Mars was 5 weeks away from its closest approach in 15 years and so was very bright, and getting brighter each night. The setting waxing Moon lights the scene plus the sky is bright from solstice twilight. Some bands of airglow color the sky. Mars is in Capricornus."

Waterton Lakes National Park
https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/ab/waterton/

Credit: Alan Dyer
Alan's Website: http://amazingsky.net
Location: Alberta, Canada
Image Date: June 20, 2018

+Travel Alberta

Technical details:
This is a stack of 6 exposures for the ground, mean combined to smooth noise, and one exposure for the sky and reflection. All 25 seconds at f/2 with the 35mm lens and Canon 6D MkII at ISO 800.

#Earth #Astronomy #Space #Science #Planet #Mars #Stars #WatertonLakes #NationalPark #Alberta #Canada #Skywatching #Astrophotography #Photography #STEM #Education
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One galaxy, three supernovae | Hubble
In astronomy, the devil is in the details—as this image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide-Field Camera 3, demonstrates. The numerous fuzzy blobs and glowing shapes scattered across this image make up a galaxy cluster named RXC J0949.8+1707.

Located to the upper right of the frame sits an especially beautiful and interesting barred spiral galaxy, seen face-on. In the past decade, astronomers peering at this galaxy have possibly discovered not one but three examples of a cosmic phenomenon known as a supernova, the magnificently bright explosion of a star nearing the end of its life.

The newest supernova candidate is nicknamed SN Antikythera, and can be seen to the lower right of the host galaxy. This shone brightly in visible and infrared light over a number of years before fading slightly. The two other supernovae, nicknamed SN Eleanor and SN Alexander, were present in data collected in 2011 but are not visible in this image, which was taken a few years later—their temporary nature unambiguously confirmed their status as supernovae. If future observations of RXC J0949.8+1707 show SN Antikythera to have disappeared then we can most likely label it a supernova, as with its two older (and now absent from the images) siblings.

This image was taken as part of an observing programme called RELICS (Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey). RELICS imaged 41 massive galaxy clusters with the aim of finding the brightest distant galaxies for the forthcoming NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to study.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, RELICS
Release Date: June 18, 2018

+Hubble Space Telescope
+European Space Agency, ESA
+NASA Goddard
+Space Telescope Science Institute

#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #Galaxy #RXCJ094981707 #Stars #Supernova #Supernovae #SNAntikythera #SNEleanor #SNAlexander #Cosmos #Universe #ESA #Goddard #GSFC #STScI #STEM #Education
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The Galactic Deep


Credit: Bill Metallinos
Location: Lake Korission, Chalikounas, Kerkira, Greece
Image Date: June 11, 2018

+Commission for Dark Skies

Technical details:
Sony Alpha a7S II, ef 85 1.2 Lii, 85mm, f/2, iso1600, 30X30sec, eq6, trace & stacked

#Earth #Astronomy #Space #Science #Stars #MilkyWay #Galaxy #Astrophotography #Photography #Art #LakeKorission #Chalikounas #Kerkira #Greece #Europe #STEM #Education
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Mars: Dune Ripples in Hellas Planitia | NASA
On the Migration of Ripples in Hellas Planitia — This is part of a large dune field inside the western rim of Hellas Planitia. The field is located at an elevation that is deeper than most dune fields at this latitude. How does that impact ripple migration?

Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) image
(258 km above the surface, less than 1 km top to bottom and north is to the right.)

The University of Arizona, Tucson, operates HiRISE, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
Release Date: June 13, 2018

+NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
+NASA Solar System Exploration
+The University of Arizona

#NASA #Mars #Space #Astronomy #Science #Geology #HellasPlanitia #Dunes #Landscape #Terrain #Geoscience #RedPlanet #MRO #Reconnaissance #Orbiter #Spacecraft #HiRISE #Camera #JPL #STEM #Education
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The Cat's Eye Nebula from Hubble
Image Credit: +NASA, +European Space Agency, ESA, HEIC, and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180610.html

To some, it may look like a cat's eye. The alluring Cat's Eye nebula, however, lies three thousand light-years from Earth across interstellar space. A classic planetary nebula, the Cat's Eye (NGC 6543) represents a final, brief yet glorious phase in the life of a sun-like star. This nebula's dying central star may have produced the simple, outer pattern of dusty concentric shells by shrugging off outer layers in a series of regular convulsions. But the formation of the beautiful, more complex inner structures is not well understood. Seen so clearly in this digitally sharpened Hubble Space Telescope image, the truly cosmic eye is over half a light-year across. Of course, gazing into this Cat's Eye, astronomers may well be seeing the fate of our sun, destined to enter its own planetary nebula phase of evolution ... in about 5 billion years.
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Countryside Mars and Milky Way
Image Credit & Copyright: Jose Luis Hernandez Verdejo
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180609.html

Mars shines brightly now in planet Earth's sky. Seen with a yellowish hue it rises over the hills and far away in this serene night skyscape, a countryside panorama recorded last month from Parque Nacional de Cabaneros in Spain. The Milky Way too extends above the distant hills into a starry sky. Its faint pinkish nebulae, cosmic rifts and rivers of dust are mingled with the pale, diffuse glow of starlight. Mimicking Mars' yellow tint, bright star Antares shines to the right of the central Milky Way starclouds. Of course, CubeSats from Earth are on their way to the Red Planet.
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The Clash of NGC 3256
Image Credit & License: +NASA, +European Space Agency, ESA, Hubble Space Telescope
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180607.html

Marked by an unusually bright central region, swirling dust lanes, and far flung tidal tails, peculiar NGC 3256 is the aftermath of a truly cosmic collision. The 500 million year old clash of two separate galaxies spans some 100 thousand light-years in this sharp Hubble view. Of course when two galaxies collide, individual stars rarely do. Giant galactic clouds of molecular gas and dust do interact though, and produce spectacular bursts of star formation. In this galaxy clash, the two original spiral galaxies had similar masses. Their disks are no longer distinct and the two galactic nuclei are hidden by obscuring dust. On the timescale of a few hundred million years the nuclei will likely also merge as NGC 3256 becomes a single large elliptical galaxy. NGC 3256 itself is nearly 100 million light-years distant toward the southern sailing constellation Vela. The frame includes many even more distant background galaxies and spiky foreground stars.
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A Sun Pillar over Norway
Image Credit: Thorleif Rødland
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180606.html

Have you ever seen a sun pillar? When the air is cold and the Sun is rising or setting, falling ice crystals can reflect sunlight and create an unusual column of light. Ice sometimes forms flat, six-sided shaped crystals as it falls from high-level clouds. Air resistance causes these crystals to lie nearly flat much of the time as they flutter to the ground. Sunlight reflects off crystals that are properly aligned, creating the sun-sun-pillar effect. In the featured picture taken last week, a sun-pillar reflects light from a Sun setting over Fensfjorden, Norway.
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