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Jeffrey Boser
Works at None of Your Business
Attended JP Taravella High
Lived in Las Vegas, Nevada
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Jeffrey Boser

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Pretty much, thats why

Yet another example of someone who said it better than I could:
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I have seen the one about hymens.   :)
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Jeffrey Boser

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While politicians of all stripes are bought and paid for in various ways, the organized way the plutocrats have bought the right with their think tanks (Heritage Foundation, Center for American Progress), media (Fox News, Premiere Networks), policy organizations (Alec), and paid talking heads is incredibly disturbing to me.
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I am currently having a hard time wrapping my head around inter-thread communication while programming an android app.

In the process, I have become convinced that nested classes are a huge java issue, contributing little in exchange for the added complexity.  Other than my headache. #java
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Jeffrey Boser

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COSMOS

I have been enjoying Cosmos for the most part, but this week's episode about gravity, the speed of light, and cosmological evolution, was perhaps the weakest episode so far for me.

The Big Bang Theory, a term first used by someone who did not agree with the idea, is an expansion event.  Whatever the universe was 'before' spacetime came into being, when it did there was an infinite amount of spacetime.    One moment before the first moment there was nothing, then there was infinite space and the start of time.  There was no 'universe was the size of a marble' point, or any time in the process where the universe was once 'this small' and then got 'this big', because there is nothing those comparisons can be relative to.

As far back as you could go, as far as we have been able to determine, the universe was infinitely big.   There was no spherical thing exploding like in the special affect.   In a very bad analogy, it was like a light switched on and suddenly everywhere there was light, and then more and more light.  The expansion event that happened after spacetime came into being, yes everything we can see (the observable part of the universe) was small and grew very fast, like part of pizza dough that is being stretched out, but this was happening everywhere so there was no hot orange ball of radiation, no ball, no 'something' exploding into 'nothing'.   As far as we know, there is no nothing, that the idea of what is past the edge of the universe is an idea that makes no sense.

Now, Tyson tried to explain it, but he did a poor job of it, confusing several things.   Especially when he started talking about time and the speed of light, where he smashed that and the theory of relativity together like two dinner plates that shatter when they come together.  I hope he approaches these ideas in a more detailed way in future episodes, and explains how they meet and the implications of that.   But for now, meh.

For the record, it is not traveling at the speed of light that slows your biological clock down.   Like Tyson said, there is no absolute speed.   If two spaceships travel away from each other near the speed of light, they both seem to see the other as if the other's time was passing slowly.  If a spaceship leaves earth and looks back, earth seems to be rotating slowly.   And from the earth's point of view, the crew of the ship seem to be moving slowly.
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Jeffrey Boser

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Problem with the end there.  We can see other galaxies with the naked eye from earth.  There is no reason this would not be the case from a point of view outside our own galaxy.  While the milky way would be gone, we'd still see more than blackness.
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The whole 'what you would see while traveling at light speed' thing is weird to begin with.   Stop taking this in dumb circles.  My only point was that simply leaving the galaxy doesn't mean you would only see blackness around you.    The sky is full of billions of galaxies even on earth, even within the atmosphere, you'd still see those no matter where you were in the observable universe.
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Jeffrey Boser

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US CITES SECURITY MORE TO CENSOR, DENY RECORDS

This is one of the things I am most disappointed about with Obama.  When the Bush administration clamped down on FOI requests after 911, and the whole do-not-question-the-president-during-war thing swept the country it made me really angry.

While there are other minor disappointments with his administration, his continued reliance on government secrecy, FISA, the NSA, and so forth are the big ones.
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So I watched most of the debate between Nye and Ham this past evening.   Sure enough, just like I expected, the majority of Ham's proposal is what I call The Dog Didn't Poop On My Lawn argument.

He tried to separate science into Observational science, which is stuff we are looking at as it happens right now, and Historical science, which is our 'interpretation' of the evidence around us of what happened in the past.   The idea is, of course, that nobody was there to witness the earth forming or evolution happening, so scientists can't really know.   ie, the dog didnt poop on my lawn, even though i see the evidence right there on my lawn.

And of course Ham threw in the usual cherry picking of carbon dating studies and the usual few examples of crackpot 'scientists'.

What I wish Nye had done was explain how multiple dating methods, each with their own set of limitations, are used in a common sense way to confirm each other.  I wish he had explained how the transitional fossiles and god in the gaps arguments were bad ideas.   How they didnt have to treat their bibles as scientific facts to still find their own truth within it.

What I wish Nye hadn't done is talk about the big bang like it was a exploding thing that was growing in size.   <sigh>   I really wish the term 'big bang' would die a horrible death.
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Other than as a funny sit-com right? Cause that can totally stay.
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Jeffrey Boser

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I made a comment on another g+ thread, and thought I should replicate this here for others to read.   Many of you have seen a picture like this, about an expanding universe.  These pictures almost always show something small getting bigger, leaving people with basic physics understanding with the confused idea that our universe was really small and got bigger.  They start wondering where the center is (and are we at it), what it might look like if they were on the edge of it (would sky be black to one side), etc.

I hate this.  It is absolutely the wrong way to be teaching these ideas.

For the record, the universe is infinitely big.  It is now, always will be, and always was, infinitely big.  Even when it was a singularity, it was the same 'size' it is now.  Imagine an energy field that goes on forever in all directions, no center, no edge, no matter where you were in it things would look exactly the same.

Now, shove a certain something into it.  Lets call it space.  Just shove a huge buttload of space into the energy field.  So much that the field has a problem with all this new space, and so it starts breaking up in quantum fluctuations and starts curdling into radiation.   Keep shoving space in there.  Now if you were 'travelling' around in it, the universe still is just a haze of radiation, but at least you can make out this photon, that photon, as being different photons.

Keep shoving space into it.  Its still the same 'size' since its infinite and everywhere and has no edge, but lets say you pick a spot and decide to hang out there for a while.  The radiation now has more 'space' to move around in, so it stops bashing newly formed particles apart, and the haze starts to turn into protons n stuff.  The radiation is curdling into matter.  Gravity now has something to grab onto, and the newly formed matter clumps up, forms stars with very brief life spans, that explode and scatter heavier particles all over.   Like an infinite sheet of bubble wrap.

Now, as space keeps pouring into the universe, distance becomes important.  You see, as light from some of these new stars, which are clumping into galactic regions, starts moving through this newly-added space-stuff, more stuff keeps getting added everywhere.   So when the light from one galaxy started traveling to another, there was only a bit of space to travel through, it now has alot more to travel through.   If you were in that one spot you decided to hang out in, it looks like everything is moving away from you, and the further it is away, the faster it is moving.  This is true no matter where in the universe you picked.

Now, early on there was a point where the radiation that was left when matter started to curdle into being, has so much space to travel through, and has redshifted so far, that it is not very powerful at any one spot and has redshifted until it really close to black.   And fairly soon after that, there is so much space to travel through, that there becomes a distance where light can't reach.   That when light starts out, it travels through some space, but as it does more space gets added, so the light thins out (gets redshifted), and there is a point ahead where no matter how long it travels, the space getting added in that time will be more than it can cross.    So past a certain distance, the universe appears to go black.

This is the limit of the observable universe.   Now, this limit is changing all the time, the amount in it is changing too, as more space keeps getting added.  So eventually the universe will get blacker and blacker as more and more galaxies are past that limit, even though as time passes light has more time to reach us.

At this point, that distance is currently about 46 billion light years.  Anywhere in the universe, that is as far the galaxies you can see can be from you.  Even if you were further away from Earth than that, you might be able to see some of the same stuff we are seeing, our areas may overlap, but not be able to see us.   And if we were near that limit, we would appear as this spot did, 13.8 billion years ago when the universe curdled. 
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This is why you need to hang out wiht guys like +Scott Lewis :)
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Have him in circles
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professional fundraiser for nonprofits
Employment
  • None of Your Business
    Really, present
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Las Vegas, Nevada - Berkeley, California - Boca Raton, Florida - Plantation, Florida - Fairbanks, Alaska - Miami, Florida
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Introduction
gamer, programmer, build-my-own-computer nerd, science fiction and fantasy reader, civil libertarian, fallible feminist, predictably clueless, has issues about being misunderstood

loves Rascal Flatts and Adele, dance music and j-pop, thinks he is the only one he knows with all of the Uncle Bonsai albums

watches The Daily Show and the Colbert Report obsessively, unapologetic about loving Bleach (anime), apologizes for being unapologetic

allergic to vampires and werewolves, they make him sparkle
Education
  • JP Taravella High
    85 - 89
  • Florida Atlantic University
    89 - 91
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Male