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Jeff Scherpelz
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Jeff Scherpelz

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Very, very fascinating article on how the political process worked in the past, and is now failing to work.
Republicans and Democrats of 2016 have neither intelligible boundaries nor enforceable norms. As a result, renegade political behavior pays.
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Jeff Scherpelz

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Really nice piece discussing how Tolkien constructed his worlds, and comparisons to how Robert Jordan did for the Wheel of Time.

There are a few WoT spoilers near the late-middle of the article, partially marked.
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Most of it. The paragraph starting with "Yes, Mat was hung upon a tree to gain knowledge, just as Odin was." is where the spoilers are. If you skip that paragraph, plus the next two (mentioning Perrin and Semirhage), you should be fine.
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Very thorough accounting of the kinds of things that have made me uncomfortable about Sanders.
 
A long read, but worth it: this article make the case that Sanders is good at raising righteous anger about many issues that need to be addressed, but not so good at working to achieve solutions---and that he's unfair in his political attacks.

(The article has links for many of its claims, though I haven't checked them all.)
I started out liking Bernie Sanders, though I leaned slightly toward Hillary Clinton. Yet I’ve come to the point where I…
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Yeah, that article got me thinking along similar lines (see my own post in response to it) but in retrospect, as my dad pointed out, the article itself is pretty flawed.
(I wasn't impressed with the results of my spot-checking some of the links to see whether they supported the article's claims, and a lot of the language is pretty hyperbolic.)
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Really interesting article; I've long wondered about some kind of preservation, but this makes it seem surprisingly feasible.
The more I read about cryonics—i.e. freezing yourself after death—the more I realized it's something we should all be talking about.
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Open Sesame Now, apparently it’s pretty well established that muggle tech and magic don’t seem to work too well together. This very quickly drew disappointment from the Headmaster, who admitted wit…
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TIL: A decent amount of caffeine is considered good for you! Also, apparently I should try lighter roasts instead of darker.
Here’s the data behind making a healthy, flavorful cup of joe—from beans to brew
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Jeff Scherpelz

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I don't usually talk about politics, but this is spot-on
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Please reshare. It might save a life.
Drowning doesn't look like drowning. It's time for the annual re-post of maritime safety expert and former USCG rescue swimmer +Mario Vittone 's article.

What's happening physiologically when someone is drowning -- why it doesn't look like on TV:

1. Except in rare circumstances, drowning people are physiologically unable to call out for help. The respiratory system was designed for breathing. Speech is the secondary or overlaid function. Breathing must be fulfilled before speech occurs.

2. Drowning people’s mouths alternately sink below and reappear above the surface of the water. The mouths of drowning people are not above the surface of the water long enough for them to exhale, inhale, and call out for help. When the drowning people’s mouths are above the surface, they exhale and inhale quickly as their mouths start to sink below the surface of the water.

3. Drowning people cannot wave for help. Nature instinctively forces them to extend their arms laterally and press down on the water’s surface. Pressing down on the surface of the water permits drowning people to leverage their bodies so they can lift their mouths out of the water to breathe.

4. Throughout the Instinctive Drowning Response, drowning people cannot voluntarily control their arm movements. Physiologically, drowning people who are struggling on the surface of the water cannot stop drowning and perform voluntary movements such as waving for help, moving toward a rescuer, or reaching out for a piece of rescue equipment.

5. From beginning to end of the Instinctive Drowning Response people’s bodies remain upright in the water, with no evidence of a supporting kick. Unless rescued by a trained lifeguard, these drowning people can only struggle on the surface of the water from 20 to 60 seconds before submersion occurs.”

This doesn’t mean that a person that is yelling for help and thrashing isn’t in real trouble—they are experiencing aquatic distress. Not always present before the Instinctive Drowning Response, aquatic distress doesn’t last long—but unlike true drowning, these victims can still assist in their own rescue. They can grab lifelines, throw rings, etc.

Look for these other signs of drowning when persons are in the water:

Head low in the water, mouth at water level
Head tilted back with mouth open
Eyes glassy and empty, unable to focus
Eyes closed
Hair over forehead or eyes
Not using legs—vertical
Hyperventilating or gasping
Trying to swim in a particular direction but not making headway
Trying to roll over on the back
Appear to be climbing an invisible ladder

More on the topic at +Mario Vittone's website:
http://mariovittone.com/?s=drowning+doesn%27t+look+like+drowning

(The article is available in several publications, not just Slate, but this version of the article includes short videos.)
The new captain jumped from the deck, fully dressed, and sprinted through the water. A former lifeguard, he kept his eyes on his victim as he headed st ...
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Beautiful
“Terminal” by Lavie Tidhar is an emotionally wrenching science fiction story about people, who, either having nothing to lose or having a deep desire to go into space, travel to Mars vi…
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Good look at some arguments on both sides of the debate.
Op-ed: Who's right? There's no Ars staff consensus—in fact, both sides may be wrong.
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(Slightly early for #UntestedThursday, but I had a dream last night...)

Simple game for a variable number of players; probably best with 4-5.

Components:
* Cardboard screen per player
* 6 packs of fun-size Skittles or M&Ms per player

Play:
Players take turns in order. Each turn a player may do one of two actions: DRAW or SCORE.
DRAW: Take one pack of candy, open it behind your screen so the contents are private
SCORE: Move all of a single color of candy from behind your screen to in front, making it visible. You may score a color that you already scored (ie, put out more reds even if you already had reds).

Once the last pack of candy has been drawn, every player gets one more SCORE action.

The player with the most candy visible/scored at the end of the game wins. Anything left behind the screen is eaten and not counted.

[I think this provides an interesting decision of when to draw vs score, especially based on what other players are doing: if one player keeps drawing to end the game sooner, then they won't have as many chances to score different colors; if one player is constantly scoring, they'll get lots of different colors out, but won't draw as much and have less total candy.

This can obviously be played with a deck of cards (suits) or colored cubes; but the candy packs are fun because there is not a fixed amount of each color, and there should be small variations in how much candy is in each pack.]
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It does seem similar to a Rummy mechanic; the draw or score seems like it makes it a bit more player-psychological interactions instead of card strategy.
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via +Michael Chui
Right-wing reactionary gamers use the same tactics as religious right organizations did against video games.
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Have him in circles
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Devoted to an appreciation of aesthetics
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I work in web development and like to focus on user interface design. I own a highly personalized MINI Cooper S. I care about clothes, and mostly wear Japanese brands. I am in the process of designing a custom house with Erika.

I care about design and aesthetics. My style is Designed Elegant.
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