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Jeff Baker
Works at Independent Researcher
Attended University of Arizona
Lives in Las Vegas, NV
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Had to reshare this handy useful tip. Mute that offending commercial without having to scour the page for the commercial.
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This is great!
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This is an interesting take on the deflategate probe. The author compares the Patriots tendency to fumble before and after 2007 (when the rules regarding treatment of footballs was changed). Prior to 2007, the Patriots, under Belichick, fumbled the football at a rate similar to other teams playing in outdoor stadiums. After 2007, the Patriots fumbled considerably less than any other team. The rate at which they fumbled, is in fact, a noticeable outlier.

The implications of this are that the Patriots have been regularly deflating footballs (making it easier to hold onto the football) since 2007. 

As a Forty-Niner fan, it pains me to say this, but, #goseahawks  
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I think I read the article pretty well. If you think I "clearly" didn't, then I'll give it another read, for certain.

http://regressing.deadspin.com/why-those-statistics-about-the-patriots-fumbles-are-mos-1681805710
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This article is based upon an e-mail acquired from a Freedom of Information Act request, so the amount of information contained is very limited. The DNA was simply a quick summary between the Danish lab conducting the analysis and the researchers requesting the analysis. At this point in time, we don't know how the DNA compares with other early remains from the New World, or Siberia. Hopefully, when the research is published more details will emerge. 
DNA tests suggest Kennewick Man was Native American. A cast of Kennewick Man's skull is seen with a new facial reconstruction. The shape of his skull has led some scientists to doubt his lineage was North American [Credit: Kennewick Man: The Scientific Investigation/Seattle Times] ...
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Thanks for posting. I'm always interested in this kind of thing.
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Using a new type of x-ray called "x-ray phase contrast tomography," archaeologists were able to identify a few letters on a scroll recovered from Herculaneum. Like the more famous site of Pompeii, Herculaneum was destroyed during the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in A.D. 79. A number of scrolls have been found at Herculaneum, but, most of them can't be read. Researchers have been concerned that attempts to unroll the scrolls will destroy them. This preliminary study provides some hope that new technology may eventually allow researchers to read scrolls like this.

I am wondering if this would work on a Maya codex that was found in a wetland decades ago. Similar to the Herculaneum scrolls, researchers are scared to open the Maya codex for fear of destroying it. I had often wondered if something like a CAT scan would be able to read the scroll. This technology may hold answers for that as well.
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists have succeeded in reading parts of an ancient scroll that was buried in a volcanic eruption almost 2,000 years ago, holding out the promise that the world's oldest surviving library may one day reveal all of its secrets.
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This study examined maize from a single site in New Mexico and found evidence that maize was introduced two different times into this portion of the US Southwest. The earliest maize (dating to about 4,100 years ago) appears to have affinities to varieties adapted to the Highlands of Mexico, suggesting the maize arrived in the Southwest via a highland route.

About 2,000 years later, a new variety was introduced that shows close affinities to varieties existing along the Pacific coast of Mexico.

The one piece of caution I recommend in interpreting this study is that the samples come from a single site in New Mexico. They haven't studied any of the early maize samples from sites in Tucson. Tucson (2,640 ft amsl) is at a considerably lower elevation than Tularosa Cave (6,762 ft amsl). The inhabitants of the Tucson Basin may have utilized a lowland variety of maize rather than a highland variety because of the differences in climate. 

Hopefully future studies will include the Tucson samples (assuming they still retain enough DNA for analysis) to provide a stronger picture of the path(s) maize took into the US Southwest. I would not be surprised if the earliest maize arrived via different routes. The Tucson inhabitants were well situated to take advantage of trade following the Pacific Coast, while, the ancient inhabitants of New Mexico may have been better positioned to take advantage of a route coming via the Highland areas of Mexico. 
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Wait for it. Wait for it. About 40 seconds in will be your laugh of the day.
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Ok, at first I felt bad for Cooper not getting any licks....but yep, 40 seconds later I busted up laughing. You were right.
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Jeff Baker

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There was a video by a Danish "archer" Lars Anderson that was widely circulated last week. This article is a refutation of that video. 

A second critique of the video can be found here:

http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-static/2015/01/in-which-i-am-crabby-about-vir.html
You know that video making the rounds, supposedly demonstrating amazing "lost" archery skills? Our archery expert shoots it full of holes. Continue reading →
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What is creepier than geeks? Geeks who are fascinated by archery. 
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"Let's play two"

I am surprised that I haven't seen anything about Ernie Banks death showing up in my stream today. From everything I've read about Ernie, he was the model for the athlete/role model. I have never seen anyone write a negative comment about Mr. Banks, something that cannot be said about some of his contemporaries like Ted Williams, Mickey Mantle or Jackie Robinson.

Mr. Banks was, by all accounts, a great baseball player and a great human being.

I would love to see baseball schedule a day this season where every team plays a doubleheader as a tribute to Mr. Banks.
Chicago Cubs legend Ernie Banks has passed away at the age of 83.
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I did see a short news blurb on cable today.  It had a brief interview of Ernie telling how much of a role model Jackie Robinson was to him.
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Analysis of shells from an offering found within the Templo Mayor in Tenochtitlan (modern day Mexico City) indicates that the Aztecs were obtaining marine molluscs from both the Pacific and Gulf Coasts of Mexico. Some of the molluscs may have come from the vicinity of the Yucatan Peninsula.
Offering 126, the largest found so far at the Templo Mayor, is composed of almost 4,000 organic remains, of which 3,045 are marine molluscs.
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Wow. Incredibly interesting.
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The latest news on the Amphipolis tomb. The skeletal remains found in the tomb are the remains of five different individuals: Individual 1 is a female ca. 60 yrs old. This would fit in with the age that Olympia (Alexander's mother) was at death. But, at this point the archaeologists are not making any claims about who the bones might be associated with. Most of the bones in the tomb belong to this person.

Individuals 2 and 3 are both men, with one of the two men in his 30s at the time of death, and the other individual in his 40s. The 30-something male was apparently stabbed with a knife or sword, and the resulting wound was thought to have caused his death.

Individual 4 was a newborn infant. This could not be Alexander the Great's son (he was about 12 years old when he was killed.

The remains of individual 5 were cremated, and the archaeologists have not been able to determine the sex of that individual. 

The studies conducted so far have been restricted to non-destructive methods, but, further studies are planned that will include DNA analysis, isotopic analysis that will provide insight into diet and the relative location of where the individuals may have lived during their life. 
The Greek Ministry of Culture has announced the long-awaited results of the analysis on the bones found inside the 4th century BC tomb uncovered in Amphipolis in northern Greece, and the news is quite unexpected – the bones belong to not one, but five i
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Have a Merry Christmas, but first, you might want to make sure that elf is locked up in a safe.
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If you haven't heard yet, Joe Cocker passed away today at age 70. This is my favorite song of his, it always reminds me of the film "The Unbearable Lightness of Being" even more than 9 1/2 weeks. 
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R I P Joe we will miss you
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Archaeologist
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  • Independent Researcher
    Archaeologist, 2015 - present
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Las Vegas, NV
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Tucson, AZ - Las Vegas, NV - Cuyahoga Falls, OH - Phoenix, AZ - Blue Creek, Belize
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Archaeologist
Introduction
I am an archaeologist, and have worked extensively in Belize, Arizona and Nevada. I received my Ph.D in anthropology from the University of Arizona. My dissertation focused on Prehispanic Maya Wetland Agriculture. 
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I once used the toothpick on my swiss army knife to paint numbers on the back of leaf-footed coreids
Education
  • University of Arizona
    Anthropology
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A horrible organization that wants nothing more than to turn our democracy into an hereditary oligarchy ruled by the super rich.
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