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Jed McClure
The most important thing is to have clearly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty.
The most important thing is to have clearly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty.
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My new pet theory: Season 1 of True Detective takes place in "True Crime World", one of the unrevealed parks on West World.
Rustin Cohle's talk about "Time is a Flat Circle" is just him as a host remembering his previous loops. Carcosa is just the Childess host's term for the world outside the park. The only human guests are Gilborough and Papania, who have stepped into the roles of detectives, but can't solve their chosen case as they are unaware of what is going on with the hosts.
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After the Stone Tape episode I have a notion to run an adventure where standing stones and ley lines feature prominently, but with a mythos twist. Something a bit like Children of the Stones. Either the topic or program might make for a good episode... Or at least the theme music could be a source of inspiration for the next 'Thank you' segment.

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Nothing strange here.
Dole Air Race - Wikipedia
Dole Air Race - Wikipedia
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Well this reads like how most my adventures go.

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Possibly of interest.
I made a thing.

So a while back after chatting with +Alex Mayo about the classic 1st ed. Twilight:2000 game, I got to thinking about where else in the world might be a good sandbox-y area to run a campaign.
I ended up getting interested in the Trans-caucasian area that covers Georgia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan... an area I knew little about but shared a lot in common with the Warsaw Pact countries.
Since I found very little about this region in any of the official supplements or Challenge articles discussed this area (Mostly in the RDF Sourcebook/King's Ransom adventure) I figured I might as well make a campaign map.

Note: this is just a map using Soviet-era placenames, and not a setting guide. (The PDF does includes a version with a keyed hex grid overlayed to help the referee with creating his own reference guide.) The mini-poster version is the hex-less player's map version.

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I made a thing.

So a while back after chatting with +Alex Mayo about the classic 1st ed. Twilight:2000 game, I got to thinking about where else in the world might be a good sandbox-y area to run a campaign.
I ended up getting interested in the Trans-caucasian area that covers Georgia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan... an area I knew little about but shared a lot in common with the Warsaw Pact countries.
Since I found very little about this region in any of the official supplements or Challenge articles discussed this area (Mostly in the RDF Sourcebook/King's Ransom adventure) I figured I might as well make a campaign map.

Note: this is just a map using Soviet-era placenames, and not a setting guide. (The PDF does includes a version with a keyed hex grid overlayed to help the referee with creating his own reference guide.) The mini-poster version is the hex-less player's map version.
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I wonder what she saw...

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Fun fact, the Albatross Hexbooks hit their fifth anniversary and I totally missed it. The first ones went on sale on Lulu toward the end of 2011 and over 2012 I put out a bunch of different booklet configurations.
I think my original impetus was wanting to map a large fantasy world on the train, and not have to worry about getting the scale wrong. So I thought of a series of Powers of 10-type hex and graphpaper maps that worked well for the all different scales. (I was also pretty fired up after reading that post In Praise of the 6 Mile Hex on The Hydra's Grotto.)
The books are still regularly selling, and I see some people pick up 4 or 5 of a particular booklet type at a time, so I sounds like they are still pretty useful, although there are a lot more mapping booklets available these days.
Looking at the numbers, hexbook #002 has been the most popular, followed by the two pocket sized hex notebooks. My forced perspective hexbook (#009) has been the least popular.
Also last week +Cory Gahsman pointed out that book #001 was unavailable, (I took it down from Lulu due to some printing issues that were cropping up that I couldn't figure out) which was the only book that addressed the full range of map scales in one book. So I made a new saddle-sticked version of #001 available.
Anyway, to (belatedly) celebrate 5 years, I marked down everything in the Albatross Hexbook line 15%.

http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/jed_mcclure
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8/28/17
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Mulling over using Merc:2000 to do a Strike Back (Cinamax/Sky tv show) inspired campaign. But how dated are the weapons and gear listed? Has anyone made an updated for 2017 weapons table?

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Eilean Dubh has a restaurant...
The Eilean Dubh
The Eilean Dubh
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