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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
Works at CSIRO (Brisbane, Australia)
Attended University of Rennes (France)
Lives in Brisbane (QLD, Australia)
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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
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Education & Training programs  - 
 
Training course on "Tropical Forest Restoration in Human-Dominated Landscapes" - The Environmental Leadership and Training Initiative (ELTI) at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies is pleased to announce the launch of an online course starting October 12, 2015, entitled: "Tropical Forest Restoration in Human-Dominated Landscapes".

This six-week course will be held in English for a diverse audience of mid-career environmental professionals for $1200 USD. Attached you will find the detailed course announcement which describes the audience, modules, instructors, and key features of the course, or click here.
 
To apply, please click here: https://goo.gl/U7TVTU

For more information, please contact Gillian Bloomfield, gillian.bloomfield@yale.edu. 
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Doesn't it sound great?  Wish I had the time right now.  I hope it's offered again.
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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
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Slideshows & Posters  - 
 
The Biocultural diversity theory, exactly what I'm working on right now. Here a fancy presentation made by Dr Ana Fiero to present for students her historical/anthropological perspective of the development of the biocultural diversity theory, with some key names, case studies, definitions and concepts, all georeferenced on a world map. Even if I find that currently this theory (and by extension the content of this presentation) is not scientific yet according Popperian standards, I think this presentation has some value. Have a look for yourself.
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Very nice indeed!! It seems like people are desperately seeking to return to their traditional ways of life, and all that it encompasses!!  
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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt

Peer-reviewed Papers  - 
 
 
Phenotypic plasticity has long been suspected to allow invasive species to expand their geographic range across large-scale environmental gradients. Me and my first postdoc supervisor (Dr. Rieks D. van Klinken) tested this possibility in Australia using a 7 years continental scale survey of the invasive tree Parkinsonia aculeata (Fabaceae) in twenty-three sites distributed across four climate regions and three habitat types.

I analysed tree-level responses with a hierarchical mixed-effect model and detected a trade-off between seed size and seed number across the moisture gradient. Individual trees plastically and reversibly produced many small seeds at dry sites or years, and few big seeds at wet sites and years. Bigger seeds were positively correlated with higher seed and seedling survival rates.

The trade-off, the relation between seed mass, seed and seedling survival, and other fitness components of the plant life-cycle were integrated within a matrix population model. The model confirms that the plastic response resulted in average fitness benefits across the life-cycle when upscaled at various levels of scale (site within habitat within climate region within geographic range). Plasticity resulted in average fitness being positively maintained at the wet and dry range margins where extinction risks would otherwise have been high (“Jack-of-all-Trades” strategy JT), and fitness being maximized at the species range centre where extinction risks were already low (“Master-of-Some” strategy MS). The resulting hybrid “Jack-and-Master” strategy (JM) broadened the geographic range and amplified average fitness in the range centre.

Our study provides the first empirical evidence for a JM species. It also confirms mechanistically for the first time the importance of phenotypic plasticity in determining the size, the shape and the dynamic of a species distribution. The JM allows rapid and reversible phenotypic responses to new or changing moisture conditions at different scales, providing the species with definite advantages over genetic adaptation when invading diverse and variable environments. Furthermore, natural selection pressure acting on phenotypic plasticity itself is predicted to result in maintenance of the JT and strengthening of the MS, further enhancing the species invasiveness in its range centre.

I loved working on this paper. This was the first time I had in hand such a big dataset for a species. Actually it is still the largest dataset in the world used for creating matrix population models when compared to the world dataset of plant matrix population models (COMPADRE). Such large dataset are very scary and difficult to understand and handle. In fact my supervisor told me at that time to analyse the dataset the way I wanted, giving me total freedom on the question. It took me a lot of time and energy to feel confident that the species was actually using plasticity adaptively across various levels of scales (2.5 years to show it and publish it), but at the end of the day I proved it. Given that analysing complex dataset with lots of little numbers is a big challenge for my tiny brain (LOL), I still consider this paper as one of my best achievement even today,  much more than building synthetic models or doing mathematics.  

Hope you will enjoy the read (open source paper, just follow the link).

Reference:
~ Pichancourt, J. B., & Van Klinken, R. D. (2012). Phenotypic plasticity influences the size, shape and dynamics of the geographic distribution of an invasive plant. PloS one, 7(2), e32323.
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+Thomas Delattre agronomic look! sounds awesome. Congrats for the baby! Talk to you privately via email asap. Take care - JB
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This was my second paper that I wrote during my PhD (2004-2007) with my supervisors (Dr. Francoise Burel & Pr Pierre Auger). At that time I was working on what is called methods of aggregation of variables for #matrixpopulationmodels . For me the interest of this hierarchical mathematical method was to understand how the life-history traits of a species measured at a habitat scale (i.e., vital rates, movement, life-cycle, etc ... measured at a habitat scale),  could be scaled up and understood at the landscape scale (i.e., global survival rate, fecundity, natural selection pressure, etc ... observed at the landscape scale).

For this paper, I used this method to understand how habitat loss and fragmentation was impacting the life-history traits of a #keystone  ground  #beetle  (Abax parallelipipedus, aka Abax ater) in the   #bocage  landscapes of the celtic region of #Brittany  (France). Abax is a corridor forest beetle known to be sensitive to forest loss and fragmentation.

We found that the spatial matrix population model that we developed to represent the life-cycle of the species, its vital rates within various habitats (forest, hederows, corn fields) and movements between habitats could be scaled up (i.e., aggregated) almost always into a simple non-spatial version for most landscape configurations that we studied, and this without making significant aggregation errors that would have had affected the mathematical properties of the matrix population model (eigen values, eigen vectors, etc ...). As a consequence, we were confident that we could upscale and understand the demography and life-history traits of the species at the landscape scale, rather than just at a habitat scale. With this aggregated model at the landscape, we could also predict critical threshold of forest loss and fragmentation, and understand their impact on the vital rates and population viability of the species.

I hadn't time during my PhD to extend this paper to show how this method could be used to also upscale natural selection pressure on the vital rates (measured as the sensitivity (= heritability) or elasticity (= evolvability) of the population growth rate to disturbances of the vital rates of the matrix population model) from the habitat to the landscape scale. However I still believe this method could bring fresh new light on this topic. I happy to work on this with some of you guys if you find any interest for your own species.

If you are interested by hierarchical methods, and that you don't care about math (and my poor writing skills at that time ;p), you may find interesting downloading and reading the paper here (http://goo.gl/eYoHJM). 

Reference:
~ Pichancourt, J. B., Burel, F., & Auger, P. (2006). Assessing the effect of habitat fragmentation on population dynamics: An implicit modelling approach. Ecological Modelling, 192(3), 543-556.
To better understand the impact of habitat fragmentation on population dynamics at the landscape scale, we develop a model combining a spatially implicit landscape model, a multisite Leslie-type model and an implicit model of habitat fragmentation. The studied species (Abax parallelepipedus ...
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+Víctor Aramayo not a problem. Just email me: 
jean-baptiste.pichancourt@csiro.au
I will tell you whether and how you can use this approach. Keep in touch - JB
Add a comment...
 
Long-lived plant species are highly valued environmentally, economically and socially, but can also cause substantial harm as invaders. Realistic demographic predictions can guide management decisions, and are particularly valuable for long-lived species where population response times can be long. Long-lived species are also challenging, given population dynamics can be affected by factors as diverse as #herbivory , #climatechange  and dispersal.

In this paper newly published this month, I developed for my colleague and previous supervisor Rieks D. van Klinken a #matrixpopulationmodel  to evaluate the effects of herbivory by a leaf-feeding biological control agent (Evippe spp.) released in Australia against a long-lived invasive shrub ( #mesquite , Leguminoseae: Prosopis spp.). The stage-structured, density-dependent model used an annual time step and ten climatically diverse years of field data.

We show here that the mesquite population demography was very sensitive to source-sink dynamics as most seeds were consumed and redistributed spatially by livestock. In addition, individual mesquite plants, because they are long-lived, experienced natural climate variation that cycles over decadal scales, as well as anthropogenic climate change. The model therefore explicitly considered the effects of both net dispersal and climate variation.

The biocontrol agent Evippe spp. strongly regulated the mesquite populations through reduced growth and fertility, but we show that additional mortality of older plants will be required to reach management goals within a reasonable time-frame. Growth and survival of seeds and seedlings were correlated with daily soil moisture. As a result population dynamics were sensitive to rainfall scenario, but population response times were typically slow (20-800 years to reach equilibrium or extinction) due to adult longevity. Equilibrium population densities were expected to remain 5% higher, and be more dynamic, if historical multi-decadal climate patterns persist, the effect being dampened by herbivory suppressing seed production irrespective of preceding rainfall. Dense infestations are unlikely to form under a drier climate, and will require net dispersal under the current climate. Seed input isn't required to form dense infestations under a wetter climate.

Each factor we considered (ongoing herbivory, changing climate and source-sink dynamics) has a strong bearing on how this invasive species should be managed, highlighting the need for considering both ecological context (in this case source-sink dynamics) and the effect of climate variability at relevant temporal scales (daily, multi-decadal and anthropogenic) when deriving management recommendations for long-lived species.

You can read the paper by following the link below

Reference:
~van Klinken, R. D., & Pichancourt, J. B. (2015). Population-level consequences of herbivory, changing climate and source-sink dynamics on a long-lived invasive shrub. Ecological Applications.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/14-2202.1

Read More: http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1890/14-2202.1
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Do share this post widely if you like the science of Biocultural diversity and social-ecological systems. I urge you to support us. This is a well-curated and high quality community of > 3000 members, which is populated by  posts on the science and management of “Biocultural Diversity, Land(sea)scapes” and social-ecological systems. Since we take the time to curate each and every post, look at content, check stories and references and ask for references and links for every story, it is trusted content and science. The posts in the community represent a large repertoire of knowledge on the topic, that will progressively reach encyclopedic proportions. 

Members of our community are composed of scientists, policy makers, managers, journalists, grassroots, but also large institutions and NGOs, like working groups from the Nature conservancy, the Ecological society of America, the International society of Ethnobiology, etc... Members have been intensively exchanging science papers, news, ideas & dataset, as well as finding co-authors or build professional/informal relationship. Members are also successfully using the community to find/post jobs or crowdfund their NGO or science projects. They are also using the efficient Google community platform to organize easy-to-access live seminars series using Google hangout technology. We also interview with you, on live various scientists, managers and grassroots around biodiversity, biocultural and social-ecological issues (already several audio/video podcasts). We are also synthesizing on a highly popular google map layer attached to the community, the posts showing papers, books, practices and other relevant informations explaining the inextricable links between biodiversity and cultural diversity across the planet. The selected posts are permanently discoverable and spread via the map.  Another added value of our community is that we also advertise more broadly your best posts on Twitter, other large science communities on our Google map layer, on sometimes on the largest relevant Listservs in the world (ECOLOG-L, E-ANTH, H-ENVIRONMENT, JECONET, ECODIFF, etc ...). Therefore, by posting on the community you will be able to efficiently spread your work across a wide audience (> 500,000 people).

Hope to see you there. 
With best regards
The creator and main manager of the community
Dr. Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
CSIRO, Brisbane Australia
BioCultural Landscapes & Seascapes (BCLS)
Where Biodiversity & Human Cultures Flourish Together
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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
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Datasets  - 
 
I've been playing today during my morning tea break with the new #googletrends    to see the history and location of searches for words like "human nature", "social-ecological", "biocultural", "sustainability", "resilience", "adaptation". I can already see interesting funny patterns.

The spatial analysis tells me to see that practical terms like "human nature" / "sustainability" / "adaptation" are widely searched in developing countries like in Africa South America, India & South East Asia. Whereas "social ecological" is mostly searched from Europe, North America, Australia but also searched in India; and finally that terms related to "biocultural" is are more searched in Europe and North America. 

The temporal analysis of searches for terms like "human-nature", "adaptation" and "sustainability" are almost perfectly auto-correlated through time since 2004 (although I don't know whether it is an artifact produce by the way google estimate this).

I haven't carefully used the option that analyse terms into related terms and how they relate to each others. I let you discover this by clicking on the link below. You can change words to and see results.  
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Phenotypic plasticity has long been suspected to allow invasive species to expand their geographic range across large-scale environmental gradients. Me and my first postdoc supervisor (Dr. Rieks D. van Klinken) tested this possibility in Australia using a 7 years continental scale survey of the invasive tree Parkinsonia aculeata (Fabaceae) in twenty-three sites distributed across four climate regions and three habitat types.

I analysed tree-level responses with a hierarchical mixed-effect model and detected a trade-off between seed size and seed number across the moisture gradient. Individual trees plastically and reversibly produced many small seeds at dry sites or years, and few big seeds at wet sites and years. Bigger seeds were positively correlated with higher seed and seedling survival rates.

The trade-off, the relation between seed mass, seed and seedling survival, and other fitness components of the plant life-cycle were integrated within a matrix population model. The model confirms that the plastic response resulted in average fitness benefits across the life-cycle when upscaled at various levels of scale (site within habitat within climate region within geographic range). Plasticity resulted in average fitness being positively maintained at the wet and dry range margins where extinction risks would otherwise have been high (“Jack-of-all-Trades” strategy JT), and fitness being maximized at the species range centre where extinction risks were already low (“Master-of-Some” strategy MS). The resulting hybrid “Jack-and-Master” strategy (JM) broadened the geographic range and amplified average fitness in the range centre.

Our study provides the first empirical evidence for a JM species. It also confirms mechanistically for the first time the importance of phenotypic plasticity in determining the size, the shape and the dynamic of a species distribution. The JM allows rapid and reversible phenotypic responses to new or changing moisture conditions at different scales, providing the species with definite advantages over genetic adaptation when invading diverse and variable environments. Furthermore, natural selection pressure acting on phenotypic plasticity itself is predicted to result in maintenance of the JT and strengthening of the MS, further enhancing the species invasiveness in its range centre.

I loved working on this paper. This was the first time I had in hand such a big dataset for a species. Actually it is still the largest dataset in the world used for creating matrix population models when compared to the world dataset of plant matrix population models (COMPADRE). Such large dataset are very scary and difficult to understand and handle. In fact my supervisor told me at that time to analyse the dataset the way I wanted, giving me total freedom on the question. It took me a lot of time and energy to feel confident that the species was actually using plasticity adaptively across various levels of scales (2.5 years to show it and publish it), but at the end of the day I proved it. Given that analyzing complex data-set with lots of little numbers is a big challenge for my tiny brain (more than doing math, LOL), I still consider this paper as one of my best achievement even today.  

Hope you will enjoy the read, open source paper, just follow the link.

Reference:
~ Pichancourt, J. B., & Van Klinken, R. D. (2012). Phenotypic plasticity influences the size, shape and dynamics of the geographic distribution of an invasive plant. PloS one, 7(2), e32323.
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Really interesting......... Wonderful food for thought! +Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt 
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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt

Peer-reviewed Papers  - 
 
Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt originally shared:
 
Long-lived plant species are highly valued environmentally, economically and socially, but can also cause substantial harm as invaders. Realistic demographic predictions can guide management decisions, and are particularly valuable for long-lived species where population response times can be long. Long-lived species are also challenging, given population dynamics can be affected by factors as diverse as #herbivory , #climatechange  and dispersal.

In this paper newly published this month, I developed for my colleague and previous supervisor Rieks D. van Klinken a #matrixpopulationmodel  to evaluate the effects of herbivory by a leaf-feeding biological control agent (Evippe spp.) released in Australia against a long-lived invasive shrub ( #mesquite , Leguminoseae: Prosopis spp.). The stage-structured, density-dependent model used an annual time step and ten climatically diverse years of field data.

We show here that the mesquite population demography was very sensitive to source-sink dynamics as most seeds were consumed and redistributed spatially by livestock. In addition, individual mesquite plants, because they are long-lived, experienced natural climate variation that cycles over decadal scales, as well as anthropogenic climate change. The model therefore explicitly considered the effects of both net dispersal and climate variation.

The biocontrol agent Evippe spp. strongly regulated the mesquite populations through reduced growth and fertility, but we show that additional mortality of older plants will be required to reach management goals within a reasonable time-frame. Growth and survival of seeds and seedlings were correlated with daily soil moisture. As a result population dynamics were sensitive to rainfall scenario, but population response times were typically slow (20-800 years to reach equilibrium or extinction) due to adult longevity. Equilibrium population densities were expected to remain 5% higher, and be more dynamic, if historical multi-decadal climate patterns persist, the effect being dampened by herbivory suppressing seed production irrespective of preceding rainfall. Dense infestations are unlikely to form under a drier climate, and will require net dispersal under the current climate. Seed input isn't required to form dense infestations under a wetter climate.

Each factor we considered (ongoing herbivory, changing climate and source-sink dynamics) has a strong bearing on how this invasive species should be managed, highlighting the need for considering both ecological context (in this case source-sink dynamics) and the effect of climate variability at relevant temporal scales (daily, multi-decadal and anthropogenic) when deriving management recommendations for long-lived species.

You can read the paper by following the link below

Reference:
~van Klinken, R. D., & Pichancourt, J. B. (2015). Population-level consequences of herbivory, changing climate and source-sink dynamics on a long-lived invasive shrub. Ecological Applications.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/14-2202.1

Read More: http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1890/14-2202.1
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This was the first paper I published back in 2006 during my PhD (2004-2007) in the biological journal of the French Academy of Science (Compte Rendu de Biologie). In this paper I was interested in building hypotheses on the existence of critical thresholds of forest loss and fragmentation on the population viability of a keystone #forest  ground #beetle  (Abax parallelepipedus (aka. Abax ater), Coleoptera, Carabidae). I was also interested in developing a method to be able to predict whether the population viability of this ground beetle was sensitive to the perturbation of the quality of the habitats the beetle used and to the perturbation of the boundaries between habitats the beetle crossed; and whether this sensitivity could change with the level of forest loss and fragmentation. And this is what we did with my co-authors and PhD supervisors (Landscape ecologist Dr. Francoise Burel & Bio-mathematician Pr. Pierre Auger)

To achieve this, I developed a spatial #matrixpopulationmodel  linked to a very simple landscape model of habitat loss and of fragmentation. For nerds, the model was fun to build as I had to find tricks to link (i) the habitat fragmentation model, with (ii) the scaling properties of fast dynamic of the movement matrix and of the slow dynamics of the demographic Leslie matrix, and with (iii)  the analytical properties of the model to be able to do a sensitivity analysis at different nested scales (movement/vital rates/habitats). 

One of the interest of this approach was also to help determining which type of habitat and boundary between habitats were important to protect (or know better) for the species depending on the level of habitat loss and fragmentation. So the model really helped me predict the best targets of management in the landscape (i.e., habitat/boundaries). It also helped me predict in which landscape elements I should better understand the species.  

I had no time to extend this approach to other species after my PhD, as I moved to Australia to work on the control of woody weeds in range-lands. However, I still think after ~ 10 years that with a bit of improvement, the model could really be of use for any type of species sensitive to the structure of their land(sea)scape.  

You can discover the paper by following the link of the editor below or directly by downloading a free copy the pdf of the paper here: http://goo.gl/9Ue2oZ. PS: this was my first scientific paper back in 2006, so please be tolerant of my writing and state of knowledge on the topic ;p 

Reference:
Pichancourt, J. B., Burel, F., & Auger, P. (2006). A hierarchical matrix model to assess the impact of habitat fragmentation on population dynamics: an elasticity analysis. Comptes rendus biologies, 329(1), 31-39.
Select a website below to get this article. A hierarchical matrix model to assess the impact of habitat fragmentation on population dynamics: an elasticity analysis. Comptes Rendus Biologies, Volume 329, Issue 1, Pages 31-39. Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt, Françoise Burel, Pierre Auger ...
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This is a paper I published in 2014 in Global Change Biology. The study presents a mechanistic forest ecosystem model to help finding planting and thinning rules for managing forests for multiple services, like for carbon, biodiversity and livelihood outcomes from harvesting. This paper demonstrate that carbon and biodiversity objectives can (but not always) be co-maximized when growing novel forests or managing existing ones.

In fact, the relationship between carbon and biodiversity can be positive (synergy), negative (trade-off) or non-existent; and these different relationships depend on climate, landscape context, disturbances, and planting and thinning decisions. Furthermore, the study shows that specific planting and thinning/harvesting decisions (some regularly used by human communities for their livelihoods) could lead in some instances to better biodiversity-carbon outputs than just doing nothing, or than simply sparing forests from harvesting activities.

These findings, if empirically validated, may have important practical consequences, as they could offer for the first time a modelling tool that rationalizes the rule-making of forest management, and that helps predicting when and where it becomes better to share or to spare forests for multiple objectives at the landscape scale. Beyond these practical reasons, the paper is advancing the theory on the link between biodiversity, productivity and management disturbances; and therefore offers some new tools and hypotheses to better understand the functional role of human management decisions on forest ecosystems.

You can directly access the pdf of the article here (https://goo.gl/2p3o41) or via the webpage of the journal by following the link below.

Reference:
Pichancourt, J. B., Firn, J., Chadès, I., & Martin, T. G. (2014). Growing biodiverse carbon‐rich forests. Global change biology, 20(2), 382-393 
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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
moderator

News, Opinion, Discussion, Questions  - 
 
Following the 2 great previous posts by +Shaun Campbell, I'm writing down 3 references that complement Shaun's point,  and that also helped me realise that there was an intense debate since decades around the use of concepts like: "traditional knowledge" vs "local knowledge" vs "novel knowledge" vs "scientific knowledge", etc ...

For instance these references helped me realise that comparisons like "western vs xxx knowledge" don't actually make any sense, and are as idiotic as trying to make genetic generalities between white and black people, because diversity within a culture or race is larger than between cultures and races. They also helped me realizing that some traditional knowledge have been unsustainable, leading to massive extinctions and needed in some cases to be "updated/tweaked/adapted/transformed" ...(from the inside and not imposed from outside of course) to avoid the Easter Island syndrome. They also helped me better appreciate novel ecological urban knowledge nurtured by the experience of  ... let say guerilla gardeners in informal green spaces ...  and realize that this knowledge is just bloody awesome and can be considered as the future traditional ecological knowledge of cities. Finally and more importantly, those references helped me realizing that the diversity of knowledge is the first key (traditional, novel, local, global, science, etc ...), and the the second key is to find ways of tailoring to context from ground-up some form of coherence/unity from this existing diversity (i.e., find "unity in diversity") .

My knowledge on this topic is limited to these 3 references, and other references or points of discussion would be highly appreciated.

References:
~Cocks, M. (2006). Biocultural diversity: moving beyond the realm of ‘indigenous’ and ‘local’people. Human Ecology, 34(2), 185-200.
~Robbins, P. (2014). No going back: The political ethics of ecological novelty. In Traditional Wisdom and Modern Knowledge for the Earth’s Future (pp. 103-118). Springer Japan.
~Berkes, F., & Folke, C. (2002). Back to the future: ecosystem dynamics and local knowledge. Panarchy: Understanding transformations in human and natural systems, 121-146
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Work
Occupation
Researcher @ CSIRO
Skills
Rural and forest landscapes / Biocultural diversity / Biodiversity / Ecosystem Services / Livelihoods / Governance / Mathematics / Nested dynamic systems / Decision-Aid & Decision-Making / Optimization problems / Multiple objectives / multiple stakeholders / Multiple constraints
Employment
  • CSIRO (Brisbane, Australia)
    Researcher, 2013 - present
    Flagship: Land & Water (Dr Paul Hardisty) / Program: Ecological Knowledge & Services (Dr Ian Cresswell) / Group: Biodiversity Planning (Dr Dan Metcalfe) / Team: Conservation Decisions (Dr Iadine Chades)
  • CSIRO (Brisbane, Australia)
    OCE Postoctoral fellow, 2010 - 2013
    Division: Ecosystem Sciences (Dr Mark Londsdale) / Program: Ecology (Dr Dan Metcalfe) / Group: Conservation Ecology (Dr Chris Pavey) / Team: Conservation Decisions (Dr Tara Martin)
  • CSIRO (Brisbane, Australia)
    Postdoctoral fellow, 2007 - 2010
    Division: Entomology (Dr Mark Londsdale) / Team: Tropical Weeds (Dr Rieks van Klinken)
  • CNRS (Rennes, France)
    Research associate, 2007 - 2007
    UMR 6553 ECOBIO / Team: Landscape, climate change & biodiversity (Dr Francoise Burel)
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Currently
Brisbane (QLD, Australia)
Previously
Perroz-Gireg (BZH, Europe)
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Researcher @ CSIRO working on decision-aiding related to biodiversity, ecosystem services & biocultural diversity in Rural and Forest landscapes
Introduction

I am a researcher working at CSIRO on the management of forest and rural landscapes. I am broadly interested in ways of integrating knowledge of the inextricable links between human and nature into decision aiding models. These models are intended to aid forest and rural stakeholders structuring their decisions when managing their biodiversity resources, ecosystem services and biocultural diversity heritages. Along those lines, my work is driven by three themes: 

- 1) Biodiversity & Ecosystem Services - I am first interested in understanding and finding strategies to best manage the links between biodiversity and ecosystem services. For this theme, I am developing ways of combining data (ecological, economic, behavioural, social and cultural data) with mechanistic models and computer decision support systems to understand and inform stakeholders how human decisions and their environment impact biological processes at different nested scales (habitat, landscape, region, continent) or levels of organizations (e.g., organism, population, community, ecosystem), to then scale-up and induce species co-existence, species extinctions (losers), species invasions (winners), and the provisioning of ecosystem services essential for human well-being. On this theme, I have many ongoing projects involving various collaborators from CSIRO and overseas.

- 2) Biocultural Diversity Theory - I am also interested in understanding & finding ways of managing biodiversity and ecosystem services via their inextricable links with various dimensions of human cultural diversity. For this theme, I am leading currently several modelling projects around the links between biodiversity and economic diversification, institutional/actor diversification, diversity of knowledge/belief/practices, and linguistic diversification.

- 3) Decision-Aiding Science - I am finally working on the development of computerized decision-aid systems that can facilitate shared decision-making for stakeholders who need to adaptively / iteratively solve a diversity of conflicting/synergistic social, ecological, production and cultural objectives; while considering the local diversity of everyday's' life constrains, practices, preferences, knowledge and worldviews. For this theme I am currently working with the +Conservation Decisions Team (CSIRO), and particularly post-doc research fellow Dr +Yann Dujardin specialized in Operation Research & Decision-Aiding.

You can see a summary of my publications here

Education
  • University of Rennes (France)
    PhD in rural landscape ecology, 2004 - 2007
    Dr. Francoise Burel (UMR CNRS 6553) & Dr. Pierre Auger (IRD GEODES)
  • University of Grenoble-Alpes (France)
    Master of "Biomathematics, Biostatistics & Computer science", 2003 - 2004
  • University of Rennes (France)
    Master "Biodiversity, Ecology & Environment", 2002 - 2003
  • University of Rennes (France)
    Licence of "Ecology, Evolution & Ethology", 1999 - 2002
  • University of Paris: René Descartes (France)
    Faculty of Medicine, 1997 - 1999
Contact Information
Work
Phone
+61 7 3833 5680
Email
Address
CSIRO, EcoSciences Precinct. 41 Boggo Road, Dutton Park QLD 4102 Australia