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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
Works at CSIRO (Brisbane, Australia)
Attended University of Rennes (France)
Lives in Brisbane (QLD, Australia)
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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
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News, Opinion, Discussion, Questions  - 
 
Following the 2 great previous posts by +Shaun Campbell, I'm writing down 3 references that complement Shaun's point,  and that also helped me realise that there was an intense debate since decades around the use of concepts like: "traditional knowledge" vs "local knowledge" vs "novel knowledge" vs "scientific knowledge", etc ...

For instance these references helped me realise that comparisons like "western vs xxx knowledge" don't actually make any sense, and are as idiotic as trying to make genetic generalities between white and black people, because diversity within a culture or race is larger than between cultures and races. They also helped me realizing that some traditional knowledge have been unsustainable, leading to massive extinctions and needed in some cases to be "updated/tweaked/adapted/transformed" ...(from the inside and not imposed from outside of course) to avoid the Easter Island syndrome. They also helped me better appreciate novel ecological urban knowledge nurtured by the experience of  ... let say guerilla gardeners in informal green spaces ...  and realize that this knowledge is just bloody awesome and can be considered as the future traditional ecological knowledge of cities. Finally and more importantly, those references helped me realizing that the diversity of knowledge is the first key (traditional, novel, local, global, science, etc ...), and the the second key is to find ways of tailoring to context from ground-up some form of coherence/unity from this existing diversity (i.e., find "unity in diversity") .

My knowledge on this topic is limited to these 3 references, and other references or points of discussion would be highly appreciated.

References:
~Cocks, M. (2006). Biocultural diversity: moving beyond the realm of ‘indigenous’ and ‘local’people. Human Ecology, 34(2), 185-200.
~Robbins, P. (2014). No going back: The political ethics of ecological novelty. In Traditional Wisdom and Modern Knowledge for the Earth’s Future (pp. 103-118). Springer Japan.
~Berkes, F., & Folke, C. (2002). Back to the future: ecosystem dynamics and local knowledge. Panarchy: Understanding transformations in human and natural systems, 121-146
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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
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News, Opinion, Discussion, Questions  - 
 
An recent example of how the cultural conservation / livelihood development nexus (in what is called cultural landscapes) suffers from the same complex issues than the one related to biodiversity conservation and livelihood development in "biocultural landscapes". See a previous post on how cultural landscape and biocultural landscape concepts share similar approaches but have also key differences: https://plus.google.com/+JeanBaptistePichancourt/posts/R3KU1EMoysp 
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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
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Jobs Central  - 
 
The Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF) in Müncheberg seeks up to six research assistants (post-docs) to work on issues concerning the ecological and socio-economic effects of multifunctional agricultural landscape use around 3 core topics:

- “Landscape Functioning” (core topic I),
- “Land Use Change and Impacts” (core topic II)
- “Land Use Conflicts and Governance” (core topic III). 

Each successful candidate shall explore one of the following issues:

- Innovative methods to identify land use conflicts and/or landscape preferences (core topic III)
- Interaction of different institutions in rural landscapes (core topic III)
- Operationalising the ecosystem service approach for different types of governance (core topic III)
- CO2 fluxes and carbon dynamics in agricultural landscapes (core topic I).
- Biogeochemistry of temporarily flooded soils and its relation to landscape processes (core topic I).
- Role of functional traits for carbon and nitrogen dynamics in agricultural landscapes (core topic I).
- Long-term effects of agricultural systems on soil productivity and ecosystem services (core topic II).
- Self-regulation ability/ compensation effects against agricultural pressures in agricultural landscapes (abiotic + biotic) (core topic II).
- Modelling responses of biotic systems on changing boundary conditions (climate, land use, management) (core topic II).

Objectives:

To develop a scientific profile, using innovative approaches;
To establish a research group based on third-party funding;
To contribute to ZALF’s highly interdisciplinary work;
To create a specific highlight of landscape-related research
 Prerequisites:

Candidates for issues from core topics I and II should aim at identifying processes and their drivers, quantifying turnover rates and upscaling results in the context of long-term monitoring approaches and landscape experiments.

We seek highly motivated early career scientists with a PhD in a relevant field. Candidates should

have been awarded an excellent PhD three to five years ago and will have been working as a scientist since then
be independent-minded;
have proven professional expertise in the subjects of this call
have published in high-ranking peer-reviewed journals;
be able to work and communicate in an interdisciplinary context;
have experience in field studies or landscape-related research;
have excellent language skills in German and English
Remuneration and limited term: Remuneration for a full-time position is paid according to salary scale 13 TV-L. The position is limited to a fixed term of three years at most. Candidates will be expected to commence as soon as possible. Women are expressly urged to apply. Applications from severely disabled candidates with equal skills will be given preferential treatment.

Closing date for applications and application documents: Please apply by 31 March 2015 by sending the documents listed below to (code 02-2015 and core topic) R. Bolick, Head of Human Resources, Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Eberswalder Str. 84, 15374 Müncheberg

Covering letter
Curriculum Vitae, including a list of publications, conferences attended, periods abroad and any third-party funding that may have been applied for or acquired
A cornerstone of the application is a concept (2-4 pages) of the planned activities and how they will contribute to landscape research at ZALF in general and to the respective specific ZALF core topic. A concept-based presentation will be evaluated by an interdisciplinary committee.
Interviews will be held in Müncheberg, Brandenburg, in April 2015. Unfortunately, travel expenses cannot be refunded.

For more information about the core topics, visit: www.zalf.de

Further information on the respective core topics can be obtained from:Professor Jürgen Augustin ‒ Core topic I
(Tel. +49 (0)33432 82376)
Dr. Michael Glemnitz ‒ Core topic II
(Tel. +49 (0)33432 82264) and
Professor Bettina Matzdorf ‒ Core topic III
(Tel. +49 (0)33432 82150)
Die Leibniz-Gemeinschaft vereint 89 Einrichtungen, die anwendungsbezogene Grundlagenforschung betreiben und wissenschaftliche Infrastruktur bereitstellen
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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
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Jobs Central  - 
 
Leuphana University Lüneburg’s Faculty of Sustainability will soon be advertising four postdoctoral positions on social-ecological research. They will contribute to the "transdisciplinary Leverage Points project". Drawing on insights from systems thinking and solution-oriented transdisciplinary research, this project will focus on hitherto under-recognized leverage points, system properties where a small shift can lead to fundamental changes in the system as a whole. Leverage Points will focus on changes in relatively intractable, but potentially highly influential, system properties that could help to realign complex social-ecological systems to the normative goals of sustainability. For details, see www.leveragepoints.org
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+Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt Not involved but have great academic interest in these projects and the manner of trans - national cooperation for the benefit of all .
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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
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Jobs Central  - 
 
UNU-IAS offers Postdoctoral Fellowships to recent PhD graduates. application deadline of 28 February 2015. Language proficiency in English is essential (+ Japanese). The following research projects are around human-nature relationship and are accepting applications for UNU-IAS Fellowships:

- Ecosystem Services Assessment
- Governance for Sustainable Development
- Water and Urban Initiative
- Satoyama Initiative
UNU-IAS Postdoctoral Fellowship applications are now open till 28 February 2015.
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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
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Education  - 
 
Imagine, an integrative biocultural diversity curriculum in classrooms across the globe. This is exactly what the Biocultural Diversity Education Initiative (BCDEI) is about. The goal of the #BCDEI  is to introduce the idea and relevance of biocultural diversity to high school students (and their teachers). So far +Terra Lingua (led by +Luisa Maffi & +Carla Paciotto)  have prepared an overview and other introductory materials for teachers, and are completing three initial curriculum lessons: an introduction to biocultural diversity and two case studies. Keep checking in as they are posting the materials on the BCDEI pages of the Terralingua website as they become available. 
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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
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News, Opinion, Discussion, Questions  - 
 
In case anyone would be interested in contributing. See email I received. Humans and Animals: A Geography of Coexistence is an encyclopedia being published by ABC-CLIO press in 2016.  We are very excited about this volume as it will be the first of its kind to map the myriad issues animal geographers and animal studies scholars research, targeted to general, high school, and undergraduate audiences.  We see it as a real opportunity to mainstream animal geography in an important way and we are pleased to invite you to be a part of it.  This is an excellent opportunity for graduate students, especially, to contribute to the field and build their publication histories.

_ We have a total of 125 entries that need to be completed.  Each entry is to be 900 words, written for a general, non-expert audience, and include 1-3 suggestions for further reading. All contributors will receive complimentary access to the electronic version of the encyclopedia and will have a 50-word biography listing.Contributors who write five or more entries will receive a hard copy of the book.  (Please note, however, that our budget limits us to being able to provide hard-copy books to only five international contributors)._

_ For a list of entries please go to_ : https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzxlDEZ7wqY3dHMxUVA0Wk5SYUE/view?usp=sharing.  Entries will be assigned on a first-come, first-served basis and the full list will be updated as entries are taken.  Please contact us anytime between now and January 31, 2015, with your desired selections and include a brief biography that demonstrates your knowledge of your selected entries.

The first major deadline is March 28, 2015.  For this deadline we would need to have drafts of at least one of your selected entries.

We are certainly looking forward to working with you to expand the reach of animal geography.  Please feel free to contact us with any questions.

Thank you,
 Co-editor Julie Urbanik (Julie.urbanik@gmail.com)
 Co-editor Connie Johnston (cjohnst4@uoregon.edu)

Connie L. Johnston, PhD
Instructor
Department of Geography
University of Oregon
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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
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Jobs Central  - 
 
PhD student opportunity in Ecosystem Science/Coupled Human-Natural System Dynamics at Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, as per the original email:
We  are looking for a motivated student to join our interdisciplinary social-ecological team at ASU on an international NSF-funded project titled, « Feedbacks between human community dynamics and socio-ecological vulnerability in a biodiversity hotspot. » Our project is exploring the drivers and consequences of a rapidly invasive plant species that is invading subtropical forest lands that border Chitwan National Park, Nepal, home to thousands of rural people and endangered wildlife such as the Bengal tiger and one-horned rhino. The student will work with researchers with expertise in ecosystem ecology, ecosystem modeling, sociology, demography, environmental policy, and governance. For more information, see our project website:

https://thesanfordschool.asu.edu/nepal-cnh.

_Qualifications: We are looking for an enthusiastic student with a background in environmental science, quantitative biology, ecology, geoscience, or related natural science fields who is interested in training across disciplines. An MS degree is desired, while applicants with a BS degree and substantial relevant experience will also be considered. Essential skills of the successful candidate are: excellent English writing and verbal communication skills; a strong work ethic; quantitative skills; and the ability work both independently and in a team. Previous field experience and experience with international travel/study is desirable.

Funding: As a student in Environmental Life Sciences program (ELS) at ASU, the student will be eligible for a graduate research assistantship and teaching assistantships in the School of Life Sciences (SOLS)._

_Environmental Life Sciences @ASU: The Environmental Life Sciences program (ELS) is a novel graduate degree program that provides PhD-level training in complementary fields focused on interactions between biological, physical, and social aspects of the environment (see http://els.asu.edu). ELS is administered by SOLS at Arizona State University and five other units.
With over 100 professors across most fields of biology (https://sols.asu.edu/), SOLS is considered a leading institution in biological sciences education and research. With extensive facilities, research support and scholarship programs, SOLS is continuously adapting and developing solutions to current world problems through interdisciplinary and integrative research._

Application Process: Applications will be accepted until December 15. Before preparing the application, the candidate must get in touch with Dr. Sharon J. Hall to discuss her/his interests. The position start date is August (Fall semester) 2015. Arizona State University is an institution committed to excellence through diversity. Women and minorities are highly encouraged to apply.
This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1211498, Dynamics of Coupled Natural and Human Systems Program. An academic unit of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Copyright & Trademark · Accessibility · Privacy · Emergency · Contact ASU ...
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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
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Videos & Audio podcasts  - 
 
Very interesting lecture by Prof.  Peter Kahn at the University of Washington in 2013 on how #ecopshychology   as a discipline can help understand and reinvent the human-nature relationship in the digital age. Examples of topics approached that can be of interest for the BCLS community:

- psychological benefits of the relationship between human and (i) "technological nature" vs (ii) "domestic nature" vs (iii) "wilderness" (+ consideration of continuum between the three concepts).
- the concept of collective environmental amnesia modified and transmitted to the next generation, and its role for the next generation not knowing that we are hurting ourselves and transforming nature.

I would really like to read more about this concept of intergenerational collective amnesia (let say for here "inter-generational biocultural amnesia"). Pr. Kahn's vision on the topic was a bit too simplistic on some points. He particularly considers implicitly that the transformation on nature due to collective amnesia are systematically bad for nature, which I do not fully share. As an ecologist, I consider that connecting/acting or not connecting/acting the way people did with nature in the past can bring new regimes of disturbances and transformations on ecosystem structure and functions. Some of these transformations may be bad others may be good for some biological aspects. That's simply how novel ecosystems are created, and inter-generational biocultural amnesia may be considered in a sense a driving force for natural selection and evolution.

Anyone here with knowledge on the topic in the community? Maybe we should interview Pr Kahn around this topic at some stage. 

CC: +Zuleyka Zevallos
 
Ecopsychology: Reinventing the Human-Nature Relationship in the Digital Age 

Two lectures, given by Prof.Peter Kahn and Dr.Scott Sampson at the University of Washington in 2013. 

 *part1:*  https://youtu.be/18ZPpHUAowM

part 2:  https://youtu.be/m-iFy3AmLQ0 

#ecopsychology  
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Stimulating stuff.  Takes a very positive outlook.
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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
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Jobs Central  - 
 
Postdoctoral Research Associate in Sustainability Transition in cultural landscapes at University of Hohenheim (Germany) - Description of offer as per original advertisement published on the website of the "Society of Human Ecology":

 The University of Hohenheim (Germany) invites applications for a postdoctoral research position at the newly created Chair of Societal Transition and Agriculture. Rooted in social sciences and particularly drawing on the concepts of cultural landscapes and social-ecological resilience, the Chair is dedicated towards transdisciplinary sustainability research as related to a broad range of land-use systems. Central topics addressed are the conditions, potentials and problems of sustainable land use in the context of global change; for this, perceptions, preferences, knowledge and actions of land users as well as the societal discourses they are embedded in are investigated. The position offers exciting opportunities to be part of and to contribute to the establishment of this profile at one of Germany’s most beautiful universities.

Responsibilities

For about 50% of your time, you will be carrying out research on a self-identified topic in the field of sustainability transformations in a land use-related application (e.g. values and beliefs and their role for triggering changes in production and consumption patterns; knowledge co-production; adaptive / transformative capacity, change agents, linkages between agrobiodiversity and food cultures). For the rest of the time, you will be developing, organizing and teaching courses at Bachelor and Master level (as connected to your individual expertise) as well as carrying out academic services (e.g. preparation of research proposals, project management).

Qualifications

We are looking for a person who:

- Holds a university degree (Diploma or Master) in a relevant discipline (e.g. Agricultural sciences, environmental sciences, human geography, sociology)
- Holds a PhD or has several years of experience in carrying out research projects
- Is experienced in publishing for an international scientific audience
Has a thorough background in social sciences and a strong interest in transdisciplinary collaboration
- Is interested in interactive teaching formats
- Is willing and able to work in a team
- Knowledge of German is preferable, but not mandatory

Employment conditions

Employment is full time for three years; an extension of up to three years could be negotiated. Start date is 1st April 2015, or as soon as possible thereafter. Salary will be paid according to German pay scale E13 TV-L. The University of Hohenheim wants to increase the proportion of women in research and teaching and strongly encourages qualified female scientists to apply. With equal qualifications, preference will be given to candidates with disabilities.

Application

The application should contain a motivation letter, an outline of your research ideas (max. three pages), a complete CV, copies of university certificates, and any other documentation that may be of interest (e.g. relevant publications). Please also include names and contact information of two academic referees.

Questions regarding this position may be directed to the future Head of the Chair of Societal Transition and Agriculture, Dr. Claudia Bieling at claudia.bieling@landespflege.uni-freiburg.de

Please send your email application in a single PDF file by 31st March, 2015, at the latest, to: julia.rietze@uni-hohenheim.de
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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
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Photos, Arts, Memes, Cartoons  - 
 
Biocultural diversity & Religion - Here a calligraphy from the 14th century of The Mi'raj (also called the "Night Ride") of the Prophet Mohammed on Buraq. The renowned Muslim Persian school at that time had a very beautiful and sensual way of depicting the inextricable links between their traditional religious belief system, nature and gender, don't you think? It reminds me a bit the beautiful catholic calligraphies or stained glass windows depicting Saint Francis de Assisi surrounded by animals and plants, one of them I posted few months ago in the community here: http://goo.gl/TKfQxB. For more info, this picture is a detail of the miniature illustration on vellum from the book Jami' al-Tawarikh (literally "Compendium of Chronicles" but often referred to as The Universal History or History of the World), by Rashid al-Din, published in Tabriz, Persia, 1307 A.D. Now in the collection of the Edinburgh University Library, Scotland. 

#minchizu  
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Very topical this week, in light of the #CharlieHebdo  killings, and renewed attention on Sunni Muslims' #aniconism (interdiction against figurative representation). The image you've shared helps to remind us that attitudes, behaviours and actions have historical and political trajectories.

You're right that  until recently, the 'green side' of Islam has not much been recognized. There is a very nice point by the art historian Titus Burckhardt in "Mirror of the Intellect: Essays on Traditional Science and Sacred Art" where he says that one of the functions of Islamic aniconic art is to "invite man to fix his mind on something outside of himself" and is therefore analogous to "virgin #nature, especially the desert, which also favours contemplation". Burckhardt relates a saying attributed to the prophet which warns that artists who attempt to imitate the work of the creator (i.e: copy things found in #nature) will be condemned in the hereafter to try to give life to their works; their inability will cause them suffering (1987, pg 233: http://tiny.cc/twsgsx). 
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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
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Videos & Audio podcasts  - 
 
Originally not designed to account for nature and biodiversity elements of the landscape, the UNESCO WHC "Cultural Landscapes" framework, through this conference recorded on Youtube in 2012, shows the challenges and opportunities of considering nature and culture together, from the point of view of cultural scientists. It also shows the need of integrating the UNESCO WHC "cultural landscape" and IUCN WHC "ecological landscape" frameworks together. You will see that the concepts of biocultural diversity, biocultural landscapes are never mentioned, though we can clearly see from some presentations that some panellists know them implicitly. Some presentations and especially the session of questions with panellists is very interesting for this community.

The conference "Cultural Landscapes: Preservation Challenges in the 21st Century" was organized to celebrate the 40th Anniversary of UNESCO's World Heritage Convention. The following presentations were made by professionals associated with NPS Cultural Landscapes preservation at the Rutgers University CHAPS 2012, a conference co-sponsored by the NPS. The conference offered new approaches to both cultural landscapes and historic urban landscapes, in recognition of the need to guide future change, rather than simply protecting the fabric of the past. It brought together leading scholars and practitioners from around the world to examine five core themes around the concept, implementation, and management of cultural landscapes and historic urban landscapes. The conference provided an interdisciplinary forum for forward-looking approaches to 21stcentury challenges, with the objective of mapping strategies for a ten-year plan of action within these areas. Many ideas are transferable to ecological conservation and sustainability.

Website of the conference: http://chaps.rutgers.edu/events-15/annual-chaps-conference/118-chaps-2012-conference-poster-competition.html
Pdf of the program: http://chaps.rutgers.edu/resources/downloads/events/33-cultural-landscapes-preservation-challenges-program/file.html

This YouTube playlist was copied from Rutgers's channel using http://ctrlq.org/youtube/playlists/
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+Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt yes... well put. If we think about economics as the process by which humans satisfy there needs then it becomes clear that our choices and our demands determine whether we allow other species to satisfy their needs. Are we part of the same system or do we think that our economic systems need not account for the needs of other species...and will that 'separation' from nature come back to bite us?
Looking forward to your paper.
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Education
  • University of Rennes (France)
    PhD in rural landscape ecology, 2004 - 2007
    Dr. Francoise Burel (UMR CNRS 6553) & Dr. Pierre Auger (IRD GEODES)
  • University of Grenoble-Alpes (France)
    Master of "Biomathematics, Biostatistics & Computer science", 2003 - 2004
  • University of Rennes (France)
    Master "Biodiversity, Ecology & Environment", 2002 - 2003
  • University of Rennes (France)
    Licence of "Ecology, Evolution & Ethology", 1999 - 2002
  • University of Paris: René Descartes (France)
    Faculty of Medicine, 1997 - 1999
Contact Information
Work
Phone
+61 7 3833 5680
Email
Address
CSIRO, EcoSciences Precinct. 41 Boggo Road, Dutton Park QLD 4102 Australia
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Story
Tagline
Researcher @ CSIRO working on decision-aiding related to biodiversity, ecosystem services & biocultural diversity in Rural and Forest landscapes
Introduction

I am a researcher working at CSIRO on the management of forest and rural landscapes. I am broadly interested in ways of integrating knowledge of the inextricable links between human and nature into decision aiding models. These models are intended to aid forest and rural stakeholders structuring their decisions when managing their biodiversity resources, ecosystem services and biocultural diversity heritages. Along those lines, my work is driven by three themes: 

- 1) Biodiversity & Ecosystem Services - I am first interested in understanding and finding strategies to best manage the links between biodiversity and ecosystem services. For this theme, I am developing ways of combining data (ecological, economic, behavioural, social and cultural data) with mechanistic models and computer decision support systems to understand and inform stakeholders how human decisions and their environment impact biological processes at different nested scales (habitat, landscape, region, continent) or levels of organizations (e.g., organism, population, community, ecosystem), to then scale-up and induce species co-existence, species extinctions (losers), species invasions (winners), and the provisioning of ecosystem services essential for human well-being. On this theme, I have many ongoing projects involving various collaborators from CSIRO and overseas.

- 2) Biocultural Diversity & Land(Sea)scapes - I am also interested in understanding & finding ways of managing biodiversity and ecosystem services via their inextricable links with various dimensions of human cultural diversity. For this theme, I am leading currently several modelling projects around the links between biodiversity and economic diversification, institutional/actor diversification, diversity of knowledge/belief/practices, and linguistic diversification.

- 3) Decision-Aiding & Decision-Making - I am finally working on the development of computerized decision-aid systems that can facilitate shared decision-making for stakeholders who need to adaptively / iteratively solve a diversity of conflicting/synergistic social, ecological, production and cultural objectives; while considering the local diversity of everyday's' life constrains, practices, preferences, knowledge and worldviews. For this theme I am currently working with the +Conservation Decisions Team (CSIRO), and particularly post-doc research fellow Dr +Yann Dujardin specialized in Operation Research & Decision-Aiding.

You can see a summary of my publications here

Work
Occupation
Researcher @ CSIRO
Skills
Rural and forest landscapes / Biocultural diversity / Biodiversity / Ecosystem Services / Livelihoods / Governance / Mathematics / Nested dynamic systems / Decision-Aid & Decision-Making / Optimization problems / Multiple objectives / multiple stakeholders / Multiple constraints
Employment
  • CSIRO (Brisbane, Australia)
    Researcher, 2013 - present
    Flagship: Land & Water (Dr Paul Hardisty) / Program: Ecological Knowledge & Services (Dr Ian Cresswell) / Group: Biodiversity Planning (Dr Dan Metcalfe) / Team: Conservation Decisions (Dr Iadine Chades)
  • CSIRO (Brisbane, Australia)
    OCE Postoctoral fellow, 2010 - 2013
    Division: Ecosystem Sciences (Dr Mark Londsdale) / Program: Ecology (Dr Dan Metcalfe) / Group: Conservation Ecology (Dr Chris Pavey) / Team: Conservation Decisions (Dr Tara Martin)
  • CSIRO (Brisbane, Australia)
    Postdoctoral fellow, 2007 - 2010
    Division: Entomology (Dr Mark Londsdale) / Team: Tropical Weeds (Dr Rieks van Klinken)
  • CNRS (Rennes, France)
    Research associate, 2007 - 2007
    UMR 6553 ECOBIO / Team: Landscape, climate change & biodiversity (Dr Francoise Burel)
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Brisbane (QLD, Australia)
Previously
Perroz-Gireg (BZH, Europe)