Profile

Cover photo
Jay Sheridan
Lives in Omaha, NE
207 followers|297,741 views
AboutPostsPhotos

Stream

Jay Sheridan

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
All the Water on Planet Earth
Illustration Credit & Copyright: Jack Cook, Adam Nieman, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Howard Perlman, USGS
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap160911.html

How much of planet Earth is made of water? Very little, actually. Although oceans of water cover about 70 percent of Earth's surface, these oceans are shallow compared to the Earth's radius. The featured illustration shows what would happen if all of the water on or near the surface of the Earth were bunched up into a ball. The radius of this ball would be only about 700 kilometers, less than half the radius of the Earth's Moon, but slightly larger than Saturn's moon Rhea which, like many moons in our outer Solar System, is mostly water ice. How even this much water came to be on the Earth and whether any significant amount is trapped far beneath Earth's surface remain topics of research.
34 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Jay Sheridan

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Master Plan, Part Deux
*/ The first master plan that I wrote 10 years ago is now in the final stages of completion. It wasn't all that complicated and basically consisted of:
23 comments on original post
1
1
Add a comment...

Jay Sheridan

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
More fodder for the time travel script you're working on
We could live comfortably on resources just from space. But is it economical?
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Jay Sheridan

Shared publicly  - 
 
This is pretty incredible. They could hook this car up to any control scheme. Once brain/thought/mind control schemes are more viable, you could race a car with your mind.
 
Another reason to love tech: a quadriplegic race car driver can finally retake the wheel
Sam Schmidt was paralyzed in a testing accident in 2000. Now he can drive again.
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Jay Sheridan

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
We'll be live at LIGO for a "major gravitational wave announcement" tomorrow (10:30a EST: http://arstechnica.com/science/2016/02/liveblog-scientists-announce-major-gravitational-wave-finding/). We have a strong suspicion of what's to come...
2 comments on original post
1
Richard Sheridan's profile photo
 
I'm halfway hoping that they didn't see an event that they totally expected to see... 
Add a comment...

Jay Sheridan

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Stop and smell the…Zinnias? First ever flower grown in space is helping us get to Mars. See how: http://go.nasa.gov/1n9zioP
38 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Jay Sheridan

Shared publicly  - 
 
Wow, it's been so long! I didn't realize they were still looking for the lander, but it's awesome that they found it. Congrats to the Rosetta team! 
Less than a month before the end of the mission, Rosetta’s high-resolution camera has revealed the Philae lander wedged into a dark crack on Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko.
3
Add a comment...

Jay Sheridan

Shared publicly  - 
 
That's sad to hear. I wonder if some sort of exoskeleton prosthetic could be made for him.
 
This is rather unfortunate, guh.
The replacement limbs don’t work, but they would be tricky to remove.
2 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Jay Sheridan

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Turn your smartphone into any kind of sensor. NODE+ platform stems from NASA Technology: http://go.nasa.gov/290b111
11 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Jay Sheridan

Shared publicly  - 
1
Add a comment...

Jay Sheridan

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
The waves detected came from an event that occurred 1.3 billion years ago... and frequency is audible to humans. (They played it at the press event.)

O_o
First direct confirmation of a century-old prediction of general relativity.
4 comments on original post
2
Add a comment...

Jay Sheridan

Shared publicly  - 
 
Astronomers say a Neptune-sized planet lurks beyond Pluto
Science Magazine Article by Eric Hand | Jan. 20, 2016
The solar system appears to have a new ninth planet. Today, two scientists announced evidence that a body nearly the size of Neptune—but as yet unseen—orbits the sun every 15,000 years. During the solar system’s infancy 4.5 billion years ago, they say, the giant planet was knocked out of the planet-forming region near the sun. Slowed down by gas, the planet settled into a distant elliptical orbit, where it still lurks today.

The claim is the strongest yet in the centuries-long search for a “Planet X” beyond Neptune. The quest has been plagued by far-fetched claims and even outright quackery. But the new evidence comes from a pair of respected planetary scientists, Konstantin Batygin and Mike Brown of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, who prepared for the inevitable skepticism with detailed analyses of the orbits of other distant objects and months of computer simulations. “If you say, ‘We have evidence for Planet X,’ almost any astronomer will say, ‘This again? These guys are clearly crazy.’ I would, too,” Brown says. “Why is this different? This is different because this time we’re right...

Read more: http://scim.ag/1Ownvti

Credit: +Science Magazine  
Release Date: January 20, 2016

#NASA #Astronomy #Space #Science #Planets #SolarSystem 
#Orbit #Sun #Exploration #Planet #PlanetX #Planet9 #Caltech #USA #UnitedStates #California
Planet would orbit the sun once every 15,000 years
10 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...
Story
Tagline
Some kind of wizard
Introduction
Programmer, gamer, and overall geek.
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Omaha, NE
Work
Occupation
Software Enginer
Basic Information
Gender
Male