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Javaun Moradi
Works at NPR
Attended University of Michigan
Lives in Washington, DC, U.S.A.
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Javaun Moradi

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Macklemore is plugging the ACLU, and he's funny. This could be big.
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John Proffitt's profile photoSteve Ennever's profile photo
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+John Proffitt Maybe Melodyne can fix gay marriage rights like it fixes Macklemore's vocals?
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Javaun Moradi

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Chesterton's Definition of Progressives and Conservatives

"The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of the Conservatives is to prevent the mistakes from being corrected."

- from Illustrated London News, 1924-04-19, per Wikipedia
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Good morning! New at the +O'Reilly Radar: Sensor journalism will augment our ability to understand the world and hold governments accountable http://radar.oreilly.com/2013/03/sensor-journalism-data-journalism.html

In 2008, the "Beijing Air Tracks" project enabled the Associated Press to determine what the air quality conditions on the grounds of the Olympics really were. AP reporters carried sensors connected to their cellphones to detect particulate and carbon monoxide levels, enabling them to report air quality conditions back in real-time as they moved around the Olympic venues and city.

The sensor data helped the AP measure the effect of policy decisions that the Chinese government made, from closing down factories to widespread shutdowns of different kinds of industries. 

This AP project is a prime example of how sensors, data journalism, and old-fashioned, on-the-ground reporting can be combined to shine a new level of accountability on official reports. It won’t be the last time this happens, either. Around the world, from the Amazon to Los Angeles to Japan, sensor data is now being put to use by civic media and journalists. 

I explored several current examples in the post, including a fascinating new project focused on cicadas at WNYC Radio:
http://radar.oreilly.com/2013/03/sensor-journalism-data-journalism.html
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This is an incredible post about humility but also how we should never let our privilege or success take us away from casual meetings with incredible people. Via +Brian Fitzpatrick 
 
Appearing as a guest at a big convention like MegaCon is a lot of fun, but it’s also exhausting. People always ask me if my arm or hand or wrist is tired near the end of a long day of signing, and I always tell them the truth: my body never gets tired; it’s my brain that is exhausted. Signing is so much more than, well, signing. It’s listening and engaging and sharing moments and meeting hundreds of people in a relatively short amount of time, doing my best to not rush people while understanding that the person in front of me and the person still waiting behind them may have been in that line for over an hour. It’s drawing out shy kids who are excited to meet me, but don’t know what to say. It’s handling people who can be a little strange — if harmless — who may not know when it’s really time for them to move on. It’s telling someone that I’m sorry, but I can’t sign that thing, or I can’t pose for that picture, or I’m really not going to go have beers with you because I don’t know you at all even though you think you know me.

I suppose I could make it less mentally taxing if I just sat there and didn’t make an effort to engage people or treat them like human beings (and there are some folks who do exactly that), but that’s not how I roll, and I will stop attending conventions before I become That Guy. That Guy has no perspective, no humility, no gratitude, and while I’ve met him a few times (there are a few people who act like fans at conventions are simply meatbags attached to wallets) I won’t ever be him.

And I wouldn’t have it any other way. Because I was a fan at conventions long before I was a special guest, I know what it’s like to be on that side of the table, and it’s important to me to treat people the way I want to be treated. It’s also wonderful, because I get to meet remarkable and inspiring people, and share in the mutual joy we have for Doctor Who, Tabletop gaming, Game of Thrones, Star Wars, Star Trek, beer, hockey, and silly Internet memes.

This weekend, I met dozens of people who told me that they were scientists, engineers, doctors, or programmers because they were inspired by Wesley Crusher. I met tons of women and a few men who told me that I was their first teenage crush. I met a lot of people, men and women, my age and younger, who thanked me for speaking out about depression and anxiety. I held a young woman’s hands while she cried because her anxiety was so intense and scary, and I promised her that she would be okay. I was moved by her bravery, and inspired by her courage. I met some families who were all geeking out about different things at the convention, from Star Trek to My Little Pony to LEGO to Star Wars, and happily sharing in each other’s joy. I was honored to be part of all of these experiences, and grateful to have them.

But there is one meeting that stands out, that moved me so much, I’ve been struggling to find the right words to recount it. On Saturday, a young woman walked up to my table with her husband and her two children. She handed me a typed letter and told me that she knew she wouldn’t be able to get through what she wanted to say to me, and would I please read it.

I unfolded it, and read her story. When she was a young girl, she had a serious complication due to her Lupus, and her doctors told her that she would never walk again. She had a photo of me, though, that she took with her to physical therapy every day, and the therapists would hold it up for her and encourage her to walk toward it — toward me — while she recovered. She made a promise to herself, she said, that she would walk again some day, and if I was ever in her town, she would walk up to meet me. At the end of her letter, she thanked me for being there, so she could walk to meet me.

I looked up at her through tears, and she looked back at me through her own. I stood up, walked around my table, and put about fifteen feet between us. I held my arms open, and asked her to walk over to me. She began to cry, and slowly, confidently closed the distance between us. I embraced her, and we stood there for a minute, surrounded by thousands of people who had no idea what was going on, and cried together.

“I’m so proud of you,” I said, quietly, “and I am so honored.”

We wiped the tears away, and I sat back down to sign a photo for her. I looked at her young children. “Your mom is remarkable,” I said, “and I know you don’t get it, because she’s, like your mom? But you have to trust me: she is.”

The kids nodded, and I could tell that they were a little freaked out by the emotion of the thing, even if they didn’t understand it. They looked at their father, who said, “Mommy’s okay. Mommy’s okay.” That made me tear up again. Mommy was okay, and she is a remarkable woman who defied the odds and her doctors, and walked up to meet me. I’m still overwhelmed when I think about what that means, and how I was part of it.
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Awesome example of citizens using an online platform to help each other in a crisis. I'm a big fan.
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Javaun Moradi

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I'm happy to note DC is also investing heavily in bike lanes, with a new one coming to K Street
 
I'm going to have to share this everywhere.
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The machines are talking

My colleague +Jon Bruner has just published an excellent, thought-provoking report on the "Industrial Internet." You could also think of it as an Internet of BIG Things.

He explains more at the +O'Reilly Radar:
http://radar.oreilly.com/2013/03/industrial-internet-report.html

…but here are his high-level takeaways: 

"The industrial internet will:

-Draw data from wide sensor networks and optimize systems in real-time.
-Replace both assets and labor with software intelligence.
-Bring the software industry’s rapid development and short upgrade cycles to big machines.
-Mask the underlying complexity of machines behind web-like APIs, making it possible for innovators without specialized training to contribute improvements to the way the physical world works.
-Create a valuable flow of data that makes decision making easier and more accurate for the operators of big machines as well as for their clients and suppliers."

You can download it directly (free, with registration) here: http://oreilly.com/radarreports/industrial-internet.csp
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Sensoring the News. Excellent recap of what we learned in Austin by +Alexander Howard . Reporters, activists, and scientists are already using inexpensive hardware in networked accountability projects. What's going on now, and what are the future 
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Thank you! One #meta   thought: take a look at how I shared this over on Facebook and here. From what I can tell, people see and engage much more with a post connected to a big splash photo, as opposed to the straight link/blurb connection.
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“Keep a thing 7 years, and you'll always find a use for it"

7 years ago today, Jack Dorsey sent his first tweet. On its 7th birthday, Twitter now spans the globe, creating something that looks and acts not unlike a pulsing nervous system whose neurons -- its users -- detect and transmit information about "what's happening" where they are, from sports to television to weather to the seeds of revolutions. 

Many challenges lie ahead, from refining its business model(s) to complying with local laws: http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2013/03/21/174858681/on-its-7th-birthday-is-twitter-still-the-free-speech-party

When I first wrote about Twitter and joined the service, just over 6 years ago, it's safe to say that I didn't expect to become one of its top users, tweeting from Capitol Hill. It's more than a little humbling to find that so many people want to know what I have to say, in 140 characters or less.

Do you tweet? And if so, what do you like -- or dislike -- most about Twitter? 
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Javaun Moradi

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Some thoughts as the post-ORDcamp glow fades.
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People
Have him in circles
3,006 people
Work
Occupation
Digital Media / Software Development
Employment
  • NPR
    Product Manager, APIs, 2007 - present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Washington, DC, U.S.A.
Previously
Chicago, IL, U.S.A.
Story
Tagline
Mountain Biker. Dad. NPR fan.
Introduction
Professional: I'm a product manager in NPR's digital strategy group. My big project for 2012 is to get 100+ local public radio stations into NPR's open API, creating a news platform that includes world, national, and local coverage.

Lover of bicycles and coffee. Husband, father.

All views posted are mine alone.
Bragging rights
When I was 10, I was a ball boy for Martina Navratilova, Chris Evert, Jimmy Connors, and John McEnroe. Mac called one of my friends a "little asshole".
Education
  • University of Michigan
    1996
Basic Information
Gender
Male