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Jason Vines
Attended George Washington University
Lives in Washington, DC
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Jason Vines

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Fauxcahontas is doubly a fraud - not just gaming the affirmative -action system to further her academic career but railing against predatory "speculators" while flipping foreclosed houses for a quick buck.

And I'm not a bit surprised. This is a typical limousine leftist, wielding her supposed compassion for the poor and minorities like a political club while stepping on their faces in her climb to the top.
Before the crash that she blamed on speculators, Senator Elizabeth Warren made a bundle by flipping houses.
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Doctor Speeds to Save Dying Baby, Cops Pull Him Over and Give Him Multiple Charges, Baby Dies As a Result
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For this history buff, the Arsenal of Democracy flyover was a thrilling opportunity to see the past come to life.
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If you had all the power, how would you treat your opponents?
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This is what happens to honest cops.
Det. Joseph Crystal witnessed a handcuffed drug suspect beaten and his ankle broken by a fellow Baltimore police officer. When he was compelled to report it to his superiors, the nightmare started. Crystal, now a police officer in Florida, is suing the department over the backlash. Before he became
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I recently gave a talk in New Zealand about how I got into Photography and, well, how everything has come to pass. Some people will have no idea what the heck I am talking about, but it's my hope that some of the things in here resonate with you.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Glh3gTytlag 
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Fascinating. It seems that there's some evidence that measles infection can cause a kind of "immune amnesia," erasing acquired immunities to other pathogens. That means that if your get measles as an adolescent or young adult, you have to reacquire all the other immunities you built up in childhood. This immune amnesia effect doesn't manifest with the measles vaccine, though. This helps explain why widespread measles vaccination is associated with such a large drop in death by infectious disease in general. Anti-vaccers like to point to the fact that overall infectious disease mortality rates dropped precipitously when the MMR vaccination became widespread, arguing that this shows other factors (e.g. hygiene improvements) are actually more important than vaccinations. This shows why they're mistaken, and gives a mechanism for the general drop in mortality. This is an even stronger reason to promote universal vaccination. 
When the U.S. introduced the measles vaccine, childhood deaths from all infections plummeted. Scientists think they might know why: Benefits of the measles vaccine go way beyond the measles.
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Peter Rollins:

Harris makes a very typical move for analytic philosophy and sets up a thought experiment. For brevity I will construct one that operates with the same basic logic,

Person A deliberately kills a child for fun

Person B indirectly kills a child while attempting some moral act

Which person is more morally guilty? [...] The main point that Harris is trying to make can be clearly seen here: that two horrific events are not necessarily to be weighed as morally equivalent. Person A is more morally guilty than person B.

[...]

The problem is that the thought experiment initially sounds eminently reasonable. Why then does Chomsky view the whole thing as utterly unreasonable? Well, in some strange sci-fi world where a creature’s motives are utterly transparent to itself and/or others, this thought experiment might have some use value. The problem is that the thought experiment is utterly naïve concerning human subjects (for it does not take into consideration the decentering reality of the unconscious).

How many times, for instance, have we acted in a way that we feel fully justified in for rational reasons, only to later feel that we might have been fooling ourselves and actually engaging in some form of rationalisation (the act of constructing reasons to justify our capricious act). For Chomsky, the thought experiment is ultimately irrelevent because it ignores two interconnected realties,

 - It is very hard to know whether someone is trying to fool us when they give justifications for their actions (being transparent to us)

 - It is very hard to know if they are fooling themselves (being transparent to themselves)

As Chomsky points out, the majority of people justify the most distasteful acts via reference to moral courage, purity, desire. Even the most monstrous dictators justify their murders with visions of a better world for all, or in claims that that they are picking the least bad path. Are they being honest with us? Are they being honest with themselves? Are they acting with integrity, but within a system that is ultimately destructive? Without a “smoking gun” (say a recording of some politician laughing about how she killed people for sport) how do we begin work through these issues?

What we must do when looking at some injustice is consider the evidence and not get too caught up in intentionality. For instance, if someone is caught speeding, they cannot defend themselves by saying that they did not see the signs. This might well be the case, but it is almost impossible to know. Someone might even think they didn’t see the signs when really they just didn’t pay attention.

The point is that the legal system doesn’t have some accurate lie detector to work out whether a person is deceiving the officer or themselves. As long as there are adequate signposts, the person has done a driving test etc. it has to be judged “objectively,” i.e. without reference to subjective criteria. Any judge would find it an annoying waste of time for a driver to mount a case for their moral superiority over those who know that they are speeding and do it anyway. The judge might say, “yes, feel morally superior if you want. You still have to pay the fine.”

When we take this into consideration we start to see that this eminently reasonable thought-experiment is actually the kind of abstraction people discuss over a dinner table to seem smart. An abstraction that doesn’t take into consideration the unconscious and thus isn’t actually connected to human subjects (with the possible exception of psychotics, who don’t exhibit an unconscious in the way neurotics do).

While Harris wants to maintain that this question has some real-world value, Chomsky wants to point out that it just obfuscates in the name of clarity and plays into the hands of oppressors who have the means to claim moral motives though PR etc. The winning ideological system will generally be better at convincing people that their murders were more ethically justified than others.

http://peterrollins.net/2015/05/smarting-with-pain-on-moral-intention-in-harris-and-chomsky/
This morning I woke up to see that a private exchange had been published between Sam Harris and Noam Chomsky on the issue of moral intention. The exchange is a very interesting and telling one that will no doubt result in many thoughtful and thoughtless responses. In this post I simply wanted to ...
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There's a word for people who react violently if you don't show them respect: thugs.

There's another word for people who think it's okay for police to act that way: fascists.
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Forget Ultron. I suspect the matchup we really want to see if Avengers vs. Power Rangers, am I right?
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I lead one of the loneliest existences in the world.  I am a libertarian police officer—ostracized by my professional colleagues for my political ideology, and distrusted by my ideological peers because of my profession.

I know I can’t really convince the vast majority of police to stop acting like drones, or attack dogs for politicians, and this letter isn’t really meant for them.  They are mostly too indoctrinated and uninformed to even begin to grasp the concepts of libertarianism (especially from one letter).  I also don’t intend to convince libertarians that they can trust the police—nor would I want to.  There are plenty of reasons to distrust the police—and the whole system.  Trust me.  I know this better than many of you ever could.  The entire profession is going in the wrong direction, and we can all see it.  I plan to write much more on this topic in the future.

This letter is intended more for libertarians.  I hope you'll take the time to read it and open your minds to it without just dismissing me offhand.  Like most of you, I follow many pro-liberty pages on social media.  As such, I am exposed to a seemingly endless stream of anti-police memes and comments, which is perfectly fine with me.  I agree with many of them, and often share, like, comment, and even create some of them myself.  The majority of the criticism aimed at the current state of policing is fair and justified—particularly critiques concerning police brutality, militarization, elitism, and tyranny.

In particular, however, I want to discuss the increasingly common theme that “all cops are brutish thugs” and “there’s no such thing as a good cop”.  Maybe I’m over-sensitive, but it hurts me personally to know that the people I respect, admire, and identify with the most—my fellow libertarians, anarchists, and voluntaryists—would quickly write me off as being the enemy if they saw me at work.  It’s funny to me that libertarians, who usually fight for the individual, refuse to consider that a cop can be an individual as well.

I know that, upon reading this, many (if not most) of you will just criticize and ridicule me.  I’m used to it (from all sides).  I’m typing this just in the hopes that it may bridge some gaps, ease some minds, and open some eyes.  I’m also using this as a way to manage my own cognitive dissonance.  Believe it or not, it’s not easy getting up every day, and going to work in a heavily disliked field you’ve lost faith in.

Police have a million and one silly, self-aggrandizing mottos and slogans about how they are “always on duty” and such.  I’m sure you’ve rolled your eyes at more than a few of them yourself (just as I do).  These slogans don’t apply to me.  In fact, the exact opposite is true for me.  I guess you could say that I never drank the blue Kool-Aid—not even in police academy.

Being a cop is just a job, a means of providing for my family.  And even when I’m at work physically, I’m a million miles away in spirit.  I often laugh to myself, because I picture the scene from Star Wars where Luke Skywalker and Han Solo are dressed up like Storm Troopers.  That’s how I feel: like a rebel, in disguise, walking among the Empire.

For me, being a cop is not a lifestyle, and it certainly doesn’t define who I am as a person.  I’m more than a uniform and a title.  I refuse to grow a moustache.  I’m not one of these assholes with my badge tattooed on my chest.  I would never consider getting married in my uniform.  And I promise that my ringtone isn’t “bad boys…bad boys…whatcha gonna do?”

As a proud and outspoken libertarian, first and foremost, I am defined by my unwavering principles.  I devoutly adhere to, and am solely guided by, the concepts of individual liberty, unalienable rights, personal responsibility, free markets, voluntary associations, and non-aggression.  My beliefs don’t disappear just because I throw on a silly uniform with a shiny adornment.  Where the average police officer never stops being a cop, I never stop being a libertarian.

I would like to address some of the critiques I frequently see online.  Let me be clear: I am not boasting, or seeking your approval, just stating some facts:

I have jumped in between rampaging cops and their arrestees to stop unnecessary beatings.  I have grabbed other cops’ arms to stop them from throwing punches.  I have been criticized for not using excessive force and essentially told my critics to “fuck off”.  I have formally addressed my fellow officers to discuss the problems caused by police brutality and to convince them to act like the good guys (only to be ridiculed and ostracized as being a “cop hater”).  I speak out every chance I get against victimless crimes and the pointless war on drugs.  After more than a decade on the job, I’ve never turned on a radar unit or taken part in a checkpoint of any kind (even when I could have made overtime money for it).  I do let people drive off with their bongs and weed.  I have shamed a young officer into throwing away his gloves with solid knuckles.  When my department installed cameras on the corners, I hung a “Big Brother is Watching” poster next to the monitor.  I openly criticize the tyrannical direction that our profession is going and constantly try to educate my colleagues.  I’ve leaked alarming sensitive information to the alternative media.  And I’ve even played a large role in getting one particularly abusive officer fired.

I spend every day of my professional life saying things to cops that would get just about anyone without a badge arrested for “disorderly conduct” and probably beaten up for “resisting arrest”.  How ironic is it that I use my badge to get away with messing with cops in the exact same way they use their badges to mess with everyone else?!  I’m not saying this necessarily makes me a “good cop” (and it does disgust me that the badge is the only reason I get away with it) but it sure is a hell of a lot of fun.

No, I haven’t personally “arrested the bad officers”, “shot any cops to defend subjects”, or done any of the other silly suggestions that these internet schemes and memes propose that good cops “should” do.  They may sound like grand ideas until you realistically consider the consequences.

If cops like me (I’m hoping I’m not the only one) did those things, we’d be fired, arrested, or maybe even killed, leaving no one to do the things I listed above—which, no matter how insignificant you find them to be, are worlds better than nothing at all.

Statists are naïve to believe that government and police can get rid of all the bad elements from society, and many libertarians are equally naïve to believe that the few good cops can completely weed out the bad ones.  This doesn't mean they don't exist.

I have to admit: it hurts that so many people dislike me before they ever even talk to me, because of my job.  But my pride is doubly injured when the source of such prejudice comes from my libertarian colleagues, because they have absolutely no idea how much I’ve gone through to try to be the kind of cop they’d hopefully be proud of.

In my many years as a police officer I’ve been demonized by other cops.  I’ve been made fun of, had my property vandalized, and have been given the silent treatment.  I’ve been the subject of countless rumors, been the recipient of countless fallacious labels, and have heard countless screwball interpretations of my beliefs (from people who don’t even have the capacity to understand my beliefs).  I’ve been passed over for promotions despite being number one on the civil service list, officially told I’ll never be promoted “with my beliefs”, and was even terminated for being an “extremist”—having to win my job back through an exasperating and demoralizing legal battle, as I went over a year without being able to provide for my family.

Through all the hell my employer has put me through.  I’ve never once questioned my beliefs.  I’ve never once considered joining “the dark side” or simply “going along to get along”.  I’ve stood rebellious, defiant, and outspoken the whole way, and I always will.

I know I’m not a hero, and I hope none of you thinks I’m looking for a pat on the back.  I know full well that no one will ever build a statue to honor the one insignificant, insubordinate pain in the ass cop, nor would I want them to.  I would never expect praise for simply acting according to my own morals.

I’m also not delusional.  I see the memes and read the comments about the impossibility of “changing the system from within”, and I know in my heart they are mostly true.  But I also know that I’ve personally made some small differences.  By simply being myself and taking the path I’ve chosen to take, I’ve unintentionally become the sounding board for the disenfranchised officers within my own department.  When officers see things that upset them or go against their morals, I’m the guy they sneak off to talk to.  When officers question if they are still the good guys, I’m the guy whose philosophy they seek to learn about.  I have newly appointed officers seeking my advice on moral dilemmas (which will hopefully impact how they perform the job going forward), and even some senior brass valuing my input on new laws and policies.

I’m constantly lending out books (such as Bastiat’s “the law”), and recommending carefully selected youtube videos (from people like Larken Rose and Stefan Molyneux) to introduce officers to basic libertarian concepts.  I know I can’t change the entire system, but I am actively and demonstrably changing some minds.  It may not mean much to you, but I’m very proud of it.

Hopefully I’ll convince some cops to follow in my path.  That would be awesome.  But, even if I don’t, maybe I’ll at least convince a few to use more discretion, read the constitution, evaluate the role they should be playing in society, or simply think more introspectively.  If I can convince a cop to not beat up a guy that he could simply just handcuff, or to talk respectfully to people they deal with, or maybe let some people go for minor infractions that they would otherwise hammer with every imaginable charge, haven’t I done my job adequately?

I often feel ashamed of my profession, and frequently tell myself, “you don’t belong here”.  So why do I remain in the profession at all?  I stick around for four reasons:

a) I’m providing for my family.  Sure there are other ways to make a living.  And, yes, I do feel guilty that I’m a proverbial leach off the tax-system.  I took the job before I had my awakening, and now I kind of feel like it was my destiny to be here, for a whole different set of reasons than my colleagues who feel the same way.  Libertarians often complain about their taxes not being used as they wish.  I’m hoping that paying a rebellious cop to constantly question and bash the police, while leaving harmless citizens alone, is a good use of your tax dollars.

b) I do believe that a legal justice system is one of only a few appropriate roles that a government can play—when done correctly.  To me this means acting as a neutral third party when one person (or group) violates the rights of another person (or group).  I’ve made it my personal goal to only arrest people who’ve actually violated another individual’s rights and to leave everyone else the hell alone.  I have no desire to enforce arbitrary rules made up by some corrupt politician to make himself money, or to protect the interests of the businesses that bribe him.

c) I can (and do) use my position to educate, inform, challenge, confront, and actually "police" my fellow officers.  I often try to convince other cops that, not only can we protect people from each other, but we can also protect people from a corrupt government and the bad laws they create, by simply using discretion in how we do our jobs.

d) It’s kinda fun to be a pain in the ass and stick it to the man!

In closing, you can believe whatever you want about all police and, sadly, you’ll be correct way more often than not.  I can only make this promise to you: if you haven’t violated another person’s rights, I have no desire to interfere in your life in any way (except for maybe saying hello or striking up a friendly conversation.)  I don’t want to stop your car, I don’t want to give you tickets, I don’t want to take your drugs, I hope you do own guns, I don’t care if you register them (or anything else), and I don’t want to boss you around.  Hopefully you'll welcome me aboard.  Whether you believe it or not, I am one of you and I am doing my best.

In liberty,
The good cop who doesn’t exist

PS – if you are another libertarian cop, I hope this letter helps you know that you are not alone.  I know how lonely I feel, and hope this can have a positive impact on you.
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"Those who riot and loot should not be excused for their actions. Violence, mayhem, and theft are wrong, full stop. That does not mean, however, that the policing situation that led us to this point is excusable or without blame. When police abuse citizens with impunity and a community suffers years of abuse, the social fabric that holds communities together will unravel.

"The solution is simple to say, but a challenge to implement: transparent and accountable policing. If Freddie Gray were the first man abused by Baltimore Police, we wouldn’t be watching kids throwing bricks at officers on our televisions or in our Internet feeds. The unleashed anger in Baltimore is a result of unchecked police power continuously roaming through neighborhoods and terrorizing their inhabitants."
 
"What we’re seeing in the streets of Baltimore is a criminal justice system without accountability and a police force that is suffering a foreseeable crisis of legitimacy."
NB: Given the sensitive nature of the subject, I reiterate that this is my opinion and should not reflect the views of my employer. -JPB The unrest that is afflicting Baltimore in the wake of the arrest and death of Freddi...
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I'm a web developer & photographer in DC. I have a bachelor's degree in political science, with a minor in journalism, from George Washington University.

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    Political Science, 2002 - 2006
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